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Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over
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Kevin Dorsch: Robotics Taking Over

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  • 1. Kevin Dorsch JUS 494 T/Th 1:30-2:45 M. Lim
  • 2.
    • Robotics are great for society in that they help complete difficult and dangerous task
    • Robotics can also hurt society by taking over the workforce, thus increasing unemployment
    Idaho National Laboratory: coal mining robot http://www.inl.gov/mining/projects/robotics.shtml
  • 3.
    • Scholarly journal articles
    • Class discussions from JUS494: Science, Technology & Inequality, instructed by Merlyna Lim
  • 4.
    • Robots give power to rich and take from weak
      • Take away jobs
      • Limit freedom
    • Working with human or humanoid
      • Human = relied on advice, less to ignore
    • Tomato Harvester
      • Farmers declined from 4000 to 600 in 13 years
      • By late 1970s 32,000 jobs were lost
    • Manual versus Automation
      • Degree required
      • Knowledge and experience
  • 5.
    • http://phs.ucdavis.edu/Research/KM/ABSTRCT.php
  • 6.
    • Robots placed in factories replace assembly line work
    • Those who are not replaced but reassigned, skills become obsolete
      • Need new skills, new position
    • Those in new positions need to be re-socialized for new roles
    • Robots complete simple tasks, unable to multitask, cannot learn from mistakes
  • 7.
    • http://salem-news.com/articles/september072006/bomb_scare_9706.php
  • 8.
    • Robotics is a double sided sword
    • Robotics in factories and production lines takes away jobs
    • Long term consequences?
    • Robotics also allows for new jobs to be created as well: engineers to research, create, and maintain
    • Help with difficult and dangerous tasks
    Does new technology always mean progress?
  • 9.
    • Hinds, P., Roberts, T., & Jones, H. (2004, March). Whose Job Is It Anyway? A Study of Human-
    • Robot Interaction in a Collaborative Task. Human-Computer Interaction , 19 (1/2), 151-181.
    • Lee, J., & Lorenc, S. (1999, April). Saving Lives and Money With Robotic Trenching and Pipe
    • Installation. Journal of Aerospace Engineering , 12 (2), 43.
    • Lim, Merlyna (2008, September). Politics of Technology. Lecture given in JUS 494
    • Science, Technology, and Inequality, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.
    • Lim, Merlyna (2008, September). Social payoff – cost – lag. Lecture given in JUS 494
    • Science, Technology, and Inequality, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.
    • Shenkar, O. (1988, March). Robotics: A challenge for occupational psychology. Journal of
    • Occupational Psychology , 61 (1), 103-112.
    • Wilson, Ellen S. (2003). Carnegie Online. The Return of Robotics. Retrieved October 16, 2008,
    • from http://www.carnegiemuseums.org/cmag/bk_issue/2003/sepoct/feature2.html
    • Winner, Langdon. (1980). Do Artifacts Have politics? Journal of the American Academy of Arts
    • and Sciences, 109(1), 50-66.

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