Converting Consumer Insights Into Actionable Results

  • 3,538 views
Uploaded on

Converting Consumer Insights Into Actionable Results …

Converting Consumer Insights Into Actionable Results

By

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,538
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
145
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Converting Consumer Insights Into Actionable Results - Breaking through the language barrier on nutritional information Alastair Fairgrieve Chief Insight Officer - McDonald’s Europe1
  • 2. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT • Consumer-driven approach to the provision of nutrition information on meals eaten away from home • Iterative “fast learn” applied research2
  • 3. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Goal – A nutrition information system Which - Is informative - Has nutritional validity - Is engaging - Is fun and intuitive - Non language dependent - Industry and brand-relevant Timescale - one year (!)3
  • 4. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Key thought-partners - NSG - 2cv research (Consumer Insight) - The Marketing Store (brand / industry relevance) - Boxer (packaging design) Key enabler: Direct senior management engagement with project4
  • 5. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Method: “Rolling Learning” qualitative and quantitative research with consumers of informal eating out across three major European marketplaces Validation in: - USA - Asia - Latin America5
  • 6. NUTRITION PROJECT PROCESS OVERVIEW6
  • 7. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT7
  • 8. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Objectives • Benchmarking of consumer attitudes to nutrition and balanced diet • Exploring consumer awareness and understanding of current guidelines • Examination of current examples of nutrition information • Examination of proposed FSA nutrition information concepts: • Examination of new McDonald’s labelling concept (GDA)8
  • 9. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Phase one: Method and sample • 24 x 2 hour qualitative discussion groups: 6-8 people • Consumers of IEO 16-55 • 50/50 male/female • B, C1, C2, D, E seg • 50% with children under 12 in household France UK Spain 4 groups: Paris 4 groups Edinburgh 4 groups Madrid 4 groups Glasgow 4 groups Barcelona 2 groups Manchester 2 groups London9
  • 10. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Consumer response to nutrition dialogue10
  • 11. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Consumer response to nutrition dialogue - Dependent upon national food culture11
  • 12. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Consumer response to nutrition dialogue - Dependent upon national food culture - Confusion abounds! : Mixed messages!12
  • 13. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Consumer response to nutrition dialogue - Dependent upon national food culture - Confusion abounds! : Mixed messages! - Language of science / consumer needs to be resolved13
  • 14. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Nutrition awareness14
  • 15. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Nutrition awareness • Kcal / cal. is the anchor of consumer’s understanding15
  • 16. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Nutrition awareness • Kcal / cal. is the anchor of consumer’s understanding • Most aware: Women Mothers Age group 21-35 Consumers with dietary issues Younger children Higher socio-economic groups16
  • 17. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT General consumer benchmarks17
  • 18. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT General consumer benchmarks - Calories more = “bad for you” less = “good for you” - Fat - Salt18
  • 19. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT General consumer benchmarks - Calories more = “bad for you” less = “good for you” - Fat - Salt Local consumer benchmarks - France, Spain: balanced diet / Mediterranean diet19
  • 20. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT General consumer benchmarks - Calories more = “bad for you” - Fat less = “good for you” - Salt Local consumer benchmarks - France, Spain: balanced diet / Mediterranean diet - UK: salt, sugar, saturated fat20
  • 21. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT General consumer benchmarks - Calories more = “bad for you” - Fat less = “good for you” - Salt Local consumer benchmarks - France, Spain: balanced diet / Mediterranean diet - UK: salt, sugar, saturated fat - Spain: vitamins / fibre (+ve) – cholesterol (-ve)21
  • 22. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT How consumers balance their diet • On a 3 main meals per day basis • “If I have a heavy lunch – I’ll eat less for dinner” • “For most, food intake appears to be a series of compensations rather than a pre-planned dietary regime”22
  • 23. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Conclusion: Nutrition information currently has little resonance with the consumer23
  • 24. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Conclusion: Nutrition information currently has little resonance with the consumer Contributing factors: - Lack of background knowledge on role of nutrients24
  • 25. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Conclusion: Nutrition information currently has little resonance with the consumer Contributing factors: - Lack of background knowledge on role of nutrients - Lack of a consistent framework for product comparison25
  • 26. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Conclusion: Nutrition information currently has little resonance with the consumer Contributing factors: - Lack of background knowledge on role of nutrients - Lack of a consistent framework for product comparison - Lack on continuity in approach - Terminology (cal/kcal/kjoule) - Market sector - Manufacturer - Product26 - Brands
  • 27. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT The solution: what did consumers tell us?27
  • 28. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT The solution: what did consumers tell us? • Consumers agree a more universal solution is needed28
  • 29. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT The solution: what did consumers tell us? • Consumers agree a more universal solution is needed • Labelling should eliminate the guesswork from balanced eating in and out of the home29
  • 30. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT The solution: what did consumers tell us? • Consumers agree a more universal solution is needed • Labelling should eliminate the guesswork from balanced eating in and out of the home • Consumers make a distinction between eating in and out of home30
  • 31. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT The solution: what did consumers tell us? • Consumers agree a more universal solution is needed • Labelling should eliminate the guesswork from balanced eating in and out of the home • Consumers make a distinction between eating in and out of home • For most, eating away from home was an occasional family treat which would be “spoiled” by over prescriptive or alarmist “tobacco-style” labelling31
  • 32. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Consumer evaluation of existing nutrition information concepts and graphics: Standard nutrition panel32
  • 33. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT “Low fat / low salt” labelling33
  • 34. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT “Green keyhole”: Sweden34
  • 35. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT 3 band “traffic light” system (simple traffic light)35
  • 36. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Key nutrients “traffic light” system36
  • 37. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Trial approaches developed by McDonald’s in context of NSG input and consumer feedback on existing approaches McDonald’s: roundel version one Frite Moyenne (Medium fries)37
  • 38. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: Roundel version two38
  • 39. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: roundel version three39
  • 40. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: Roundel version four40
  • 41. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: Nutrition table based on portion size and RDA/GDA41
  • 42. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: “Signpost” icons42
  • 43. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: The “bar chart”43
  • 44. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT McDonald’s: Refined “bar chart”44
  • 45. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Conclusion: Move ahead with development and testing of “bar chart” format45
  • 46. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Objectives • Evaluation and further development of bar chart concept • Checking meaning and relevance of nutrient icons with consumers, staff and stakeholders • Evaluation of colour choice • Evaluation of communication mediums and materials46
  • 47. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Phase two: method and sample • Qualitative “sense check” on “bar chart” route • 7 x 1.5 hour qualitative discussion groups • 4x qualitative paired depth interviews • Consumers of IEO 17-55 • 50/50 male/female • B, C1, C2, D, E seg • 50% with children under 12 in household Spain UK 3 groups 3 groups Edinburgh Madrid 2 paired depths 1 group London 2 paired depths London47
  • 48. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Bringing nutrition information to life: - mediums + materials48
  • 49. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Web/kiosk approach: In restaurant interactive kiosk49
  • 50. 50
  • 51. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Pilot tests in Scotland and Spain * Phases one and two of research led to a high expectation that the “bar chart” and communication vehicles would have resonance with the IEO consumer: To assess the approach further a pilot test of nutrition information materials was launched in 14 restaurants (Spain & Scotland) between July- September 2005.51
  • 52. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Objectives • Assessment of consumer, staff and opinion formers’ perceptions and responses to he nutrition information initiative and communication materials • Fine-tuning of bar chart concept and the supporting communication materials • Development of a fact-based case for the implementation of a consumer-driven NI strategy • Assessment of any potential impact on sales and consumer purchase dynamics52
  • 53. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Phase three: method and sample Pre-pilot: Scotland and Spain (June 2005) • 3 restaurants each country: qualitative depth interviews with managers and staff • In restaurants: each country: 370 quantitative interviews • Stakeholder qualitative in-depth interviews Post-pilot: Scotland and Spain (Sept/Oct 2005) • 7 restaurants each country: qualitative depth interviews with managers and staff • In restaurant: each country 500 quantitative interviews • Stakeholder qualitative in depth interviews53
  • 54. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines54
  • 55. Nutrition Information Project Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea”55
  • 56. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea”56
  • 57. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea” • 20% of respondents said the initiative might enable them to visit more often57
  • 58. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea” • 20% of respondents said the initiative might enable them to visit more often • 30% respondents said that the initiative might enable them to make more balanced choices58
  • 59. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea” • 20% of respondents said the initiative might enable them to visit more often • 30% respondents said that the initiative might enable them to make more balanced choices • Consumers with children and those in higher segs showed the most positive response59
  • 60. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea” • Consumers with children and those in higher segs showed the most positive response • Consumers claimed that the information may have a positive effect on behaviour60
  • 61. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Quantitative consumer headlines • 60% of respondents thought the initiative a “really good idea” • 88% of respondents thought initiative a “good idea” • Consumers with children and those in higher segs showed the most positive response • Consumers claimed that the information may have a positive effect on behaviour • Would like to see a similar system adopted at other IEO places and other sectors61
  • 62. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Stakeholder / opinion former input • Initiative well received • Consumer orientation and engagement helped the credibility and practicality of the solution • Staff engagement with the project appreciated • Suggested more emphasis on pre-purchase signposting • Suggested extending BMI customisation on web/index facility • Overall, fun/engaging aspect of approach may well succeed in building consumer resonance over time62
  • 63. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Other validation • “Bar chart” nutrition information approach tested with the consumer in over 300 McDonald’s restaurants outside Europe - 4 cities in USA - In Colombia, Latin America - In Hong Kong, Asia • Tested nutrient “icons” for cultural and ethnographic sensitivity in over 100 countries worldwide • Pilot market versus control group sales impact test in UK, Spain and USA revealed not to be a sales driver, however reached its objective to increase awareness in nutrition.63
  • 64. PROCESS: PHASE 3 “PILOT TEST” Testing nutrient icons for cultural sensitivity • With iconographic and ethnographic experts in 100 countries worldwide: ENLASO • Reality check with local representatives in global advertising agency networks through Leo Burnett, TBWA and DDB International; • Course-correction in creative route made where necessary; • Example of “course-correct” feedback. Fiber Icon Option #2 – This icon generated many negative comments, primarily centered around associations with “scary” aliens (47 countries). According to the supplier, this is a relatively rare result in that so many countries came up with similar associations. Their theory is that “this is the influence of pop culture spread through the media, because the alien connotation was so consistently prevalent not just in one area, but in countries representing all parts of the globe. “ The icon apparently symbolized Greenpeace activity in Russia and ghosts in the Virgin Islands.64
  • 65. PROCESS: PHASE 3 “PILOT TEST” Learning: Sales tests in UK, Spain and USA • During operational pilots (in over 300 restaurants) sales and product- mix effects were monitored to identify any significant impact of the presence of nutritional information on business patterns; • Sales and product-mix movement were monitored against a control group of comparable size; • Influence of nutritional labelling (over a three month period) on sales and product-mix was not uniform, although influence over incidence of some product categories was more marked than with others.65
  • 66. PROCESS: PHASE 3 “PILOT TEST” Nov 2005, a workshop was organised under auspices of EU Platform on Diet, Physical Activity and Health: Approach and insight made openly available to IEO/food industry entities66
  • 67. GLOBAL LAUNCH OF NII • Launched 9 February 2006 in Italy in conjunction with the Torino Olympic games; • NII is now rolled out in EU 25 (5788 restaurants), Romania and Bulgaria and 14 other European non-EU markets representing a total of over 6,300 restaurants, reaching in excess of 10 million customers a day; • In 2006 around 2 billion pieces of NII packaging will be used in European restaurants (41 countries). In 2007 this figure will increase to approximately 10 billion pieces; • By end 2007 over 30,000 restaurants world-wide plan to have rolled out NII.67
  • 68. NUTRITION INFORMATION PROJECT Goal – revisited A nutrition information system which: - Is informative - Has nutritional validity - Is engaging - Is fun and intuitive - Non language dependent - Industry and brand relevant We think we’re getting closer!68
  • 69. Thank you for your time! Questions?!69