Engb3 developing language 1

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An ENGB3 power point for Child Language

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Engb3 developing language 1

  1. 1. ENGB3 Developing Language Language Acquisition
  2. 2. Outline of first two sessions <ul><li>Session 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Recap of what is required on ENGB3 </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on short extracts of data to revise early stages </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on later stages, with emphasis on social development </li></ul><ul><li>Session 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Move into working with data in the exam itself </li></ul><ul><li>Suggested approaches to reading, note-taking, planning and writing </li></ul><ul><li>Marking and redrafting exercises </li></ul>
  3. 3. ENGB3: what the spec says <ul><li>This topic area is designed to teach candidates about the nature and functions of language acquisition and social development of children from 0 - 11 years. </li></ul><ul><li>This unit will therefore require some knowledge of: </li></ul><ul><li>the early stages of language development and the learning of the sound system </li></ul><ul><li>lexical, semantic and grammatical development in language use between these ages </li></ul><ul><li>the importance of social interaction and the development of communication skills </li></ul><ul><li>the beginnings of reading and writing </li></ul><ul><li>theories of acquisition and their role in understanding how children acquire language. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Two key areas in this first session <ul><li>How do you apply linguistic methods / frameworks to data? How much credit will you get for this AO? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you link your observations to wider ideas from language study ? </li></ul><ul><li>We will focus on some short extracts of child language data to draw out key concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of later stages and interaction between children and caregivers. </li></ul><ul><li>How can you usefully write about the later stages of language development? </li></ul><ul><li>We will focus on pragmatics and interaction . </li></ul>
  5. 5. Data set 1: extracts from talk during play over 2 years <ul><li>(2,9) </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: Did you hid it in my castle? </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: Yes, I hid it in the dungeons. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: They shotted their arrows at the baddy </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(3,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: The goodies are going on their ship cos they’ve caught a baddie </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: The cavemans are laughing </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: I’m going to build a whole army of goodies// </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: // yeah, cos the baddies are coming </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(4,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: Don’t do that because you’ll hit the men and they’ll fall over. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Data set 1: extracts from talk during play over 2 years <ul><li>(2,9) </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: Did you hid it in my castle? </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: Yes, I hid it in the dungeons. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: They shotted their arrows at the baddy </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(3,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: The goodies are going on their ship cos they’ve caught a baddy </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: The cavemans are laughing </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: I’m going to build a whole army of goodies// </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: // yeah, cos the baddies are coming </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(4,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: Don’t do that because you’ll hit the men and they’ll fall over. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Errors/areas of interest <ul><li>Did you hid it: confusion over formation of past tense in question syntax. Has successfully used auxiliary verb did in past tense form, but also inflected the main verb hide – hid </li></ul><ul><li>Shotted: overgeneralisation of past tense –ed form on irregular verb </li></ul><ul><li>Baddy/ goodies: phonological process of addition </li></ul><ul><li>Cavemans: overgeneralisation of plural –s ending on irregular noun </li></ul>
  8. 8. Achievements <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(3,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Liam: The goodies are going on their ship cos they’ve caught a baddie </li></ul><ul><li>Formation of two clause, complex sentence with a clause of reason ( cos …) </li></ul><ul><li>Use of present perfect construction ( they’ve caught ) rather than simple past tense. </li></ul><ul><li>Use of present progressive construction ( are going ) </li></ul><ul><li>   </li></ul><ul><li>(4,6) </li></ul><ul><li>Stan: Don’t do that because you’ll hit the men and they’ll fall over. </li></ul><ul><li>Use of three clause complex compound sentence ( because…and ) </li></ul><ul><li>Use of modal will to create sense of future action/ consequences of actions. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Data set 1: earning marks <ul><li>AO1: precision with language (esp. grammatical) terminology will secure marks. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking out for what children are achieving as well as the mistakes they are making will give you more scope for marks. </li></ul><ul><li>AO2: understanding of how to link language concepts, theory and case studies to data will help here. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to shoehorn data into theories but look for possible connections. </li></ul><ul><li>What connections do we have from data set 1? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Data set 2 (Tom 2,7 with mum) (from ENB6 Jan 2005)
  11. 11. Data set 2 (Tom 2,7 with mum) G A C D B F E
  12. 12. Data set 2: features of caretaker language
  13. 14. Data set 3: the pragmatics of biscuits <ul><li>a Ruby : dat ( pointing at biscuit tin , age: 1 year 6 months) </li></ul><ul><li>b Ruby : biscuit, daddy ( age: 2 years ) </li></ul><ul><li>c Stan : I want a biscuit, daddy ( age: 3 years 6 months) </li></ul><ul><li>d Stan : Can I have a biscuit, daddy? ( age: 3 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>e Stan : Please can I have a biscuit, daddy? ( age: 4 years 2 months) </li></ul><ul><li>f Liam : I’m hungry, daddy ( age: 4 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>g Liam : Stan’s had a biscuit. ( age: 4 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>h Stan: Did you go shopping yesterday, Daddy? (age: 9 years) </li></ul>
  14. 15. Data set 3: the pragmatics of biscuits <ul><li>What do we mean by pragmatics ? </li></ul><ul><li>Atkinson, Kilba and Roca: “The distinction between what a speaker’s words (literally) mean and what the speaker might mean by his words” (in Peter Grundy, Doing Pragmatics ). </li></ul><ul><li>When applied to language acquisition, we might consider pragmatics to cover implicature, face, politeness and directness/ indirectness. There are other areas too. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Data set 3: the pragmatics of biscuits <ul><li>a Ruby : dat ( pointing at biscuit tin , age: 1 year 6 months) </li></ul><ul><li>b Ruby : biscuit, daddy ( age: 2 years ) </li></ul><ul><li>c Stan : I want a biscuit, daddy ( age: 3 years 6 months) </li></ul><ul><li>d Stan : Can I have a biscuit, daddy? ( age: 3 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>e Stan : Please can I have a biscuit, daddy? ( age: 4 years 2 months) </li></ul><ul><li>f Liam : I’m hungry, daddy ( age: 4 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>g Liam : Stan’s had a biscuit. ( age: 4 years 9 months) </li></ul><ul><li>h Stan: Did you go shopping yesterday, Daddy? (age: 9 years) </li></ul>

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