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Activity break presentation 8

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  • 1. Activity Breaks in the classroom Presenter: Scott Williams M.A. Meriwether Lewis Elementary School, Charlottesville,Va
  • 2. What are Activity Breaks?• Activity breaks are short periods of movement to be utilized by classroom teachers.• These breaks assist students in staying energized and focused throughout the school day.
  • 3. How is it relevant?• Much research has been done that proves a link between physical education and academic success.• Curt Hinson Ph.D and editor for the newsletter PEnPal (the Physical Education Newsletter forPromoting Active Liestyles) provides us with five reasons why physical activity is critical to learning: (con’t)
  • 4. • Physical activity increases blood flow to the brain. The brain relies on blood to nourish it with oxygen. The more blood, and thus oxygen, that is available to the barin, the better able the brain is to think, reason, problem solve and create…aerobic activity, such as running, increases and enhances the body’s ability to transport blood, thus carrying much needed oxygen to the brain. The more aerobically fit a person is, the better he or she is at supplying oxygen to the brain.• Physical activity helps to develop neural connections. The brain relies on neural connections to send and receive information. This transmission of information is the brain’s ability to think, learn, create, and problem-solve. The more neural connections that are made, the more efficient the brain becomes at processing information.• Physical Activity helps increase the size and number of blood capillaries in the brain, thus creating more potential for blood to travel to critical areas faster and more efficiently• Physical Activity helps to reduce stress. Too much stress affects learning and too little stress affects learning. To counter stress it’s important for students to engage in daily exercise and physical activity to help the brain regulate itself and deal with stress.• Physical Activity can stimulate the release of the body’s natural motivators. The brain is filled with neurotransmitters. The job of these chemicals is to regulate brain function based on the brain’s needs.
  • 5. What outcomes should PE teachers want from these breaks?• Kids moving in class• Fun, short bursts of energy• TEACHER FRIENDLY! No extra work for classroom teacher.* *-Kids know dances/exercises learned in PE. -Fits in with Responsive Classroom methods -Easy to access files (video and mp3). -Not diruptive; easy to refocus students.• Choices for kids to pick from, ie; exercise videos and dance videos
  • 6. Selling this to the teachers• Present an Activity Break at a faculty meeting as a demonstration.• Show to parents and administrators. Get them on board• Insert a cool down period to allow kids to refocus and transition back quickly to what they were doing• Install videos for teachers and show how to access videos
  • 7. • Let the teacher choose the music.• Provide incentives for the teachers. Ex: teacher that using them the most in a given time frame, their class wins an extra PE class that week. (extra planning period for teacher)
  • 8. 
 
 
 
Teacher
Tes)monialsThe
kids
LOVE

the
ac)vity
breaks.

I
use
them
in
the
morning
to
get
their
blood
flowing
and
their
mind
ready
for
work.

I
also
use
them
throughout
the
day

when
I
no)ce
that
the
kids
are
ge@ng
the
wiggles
(during
our
1.5
hour
Language
Arts
block
and
during
70
minute
math
block
daily).

We
also
do
them
at
the
end
of
the
day
to
end
with
some
exercise
and
with
some
posi)ve
energy.

I
ALWAYS
use
them
if
it
is
raining
outside
as
part
of
indoor
recess.

In
addi)on,
I
have
incorporated
music
and
movement
into
my
transi)ons
and
rou)nes
(tables
to
carpets,
lining
up,
clean
up,
pack
up,
etc.)
to
help
the
kids
focus
on
what
changes
are
happening
now
and
what
they
should
be
doing
at
that
)me.These
breaks
provide
visual
and
auditory
cues
for
the
kids
while
engaging
them
in
healthy
exercise
that
helps
maintain
focus
and
raises
the
affec)ve
filter.

Thank
you
for
all
of
your
hard
work
with
the
kids!~Heidi
(2nd
grade)Ac)vity
breaks
have
become
a
part
of
our
daily
classroom
schedule
‐
and
they
are
by
far
one
of
the
students
favorite
parts
of
the
day!

Every
morning,
students
have
an
ac)vity
break
between
their
reading
group
period
and
another
quiet,
seated
work
)me;
these
breaks
serve
to
give
them
a
fun,
much‐needed
)me
to
move
as
well
as
get
their
bodies
ready
for
another
quiet
period
of
focus.

Students
also
do
ac)vity
breaks
in
the
aXernoon
when
theyve
not
had
much
movement
(during
a
non‐P.E.
day
and/or
a
day
of
indoor
recesses).

Since
incorpora)ng
ac)vity
breaks
into
our
daily
rou)ne,
Ive
no)ced
more
sustained
focus
among
even
my
most
focus‐challenged
students!Bonnie
(1st
grade)
  • 9. 
 
 
 Teacher
Tes)monials
Con’tMy
kids
LOVE
ac)vity
breaks.

As
soon
as
I
say,
„Ac)vity
Break!‰
they
jump
up
ready
for
the
first
move.

It
is
a
great
way
to
begin
a
lesson,
especially
if
the
subject
maber
will
require
lots
of
concentra)on.

I
use
Ac)vity
Breaks
any
)me
the
kids
need
a
mental
boost.

Observing
how
the
kids
move
during
Ac)vity
Breaks
also
provides
me
with
addi)onal
anecdotal
informa)on
about
each
student‚s
learning
style.
Karla
(3rd
grade)We
typically
use
our
ac)vity
breaks
between
our
literacy
block
and
a
wri)ng
or
word
study
period.

The
kids
are
much
more
focused
and
complete
work
more
quickly
and
with
less
distrac)ng
behavior.

They
also
have
a
lot
of
fun
with
the
ac)vity
breaks.

On
the
days
when
we
have
to
cancel
our
breaks
the
children
moan
and
groan
about
missing
them.

We
actually
have
temporarily
lost
use
of
our
ac)veboard
due
to
a
burned
out
projector
bulb
but
the
children
have
decided
that
in
the
mean)me
we
should
con)nue
our
breaks
anyway.

I
choose
three
or
four
ac)vity
break
leaders
and
each
chosen
child
leads
two
different
ac)vi)es
for
20‐30
seconds
each.

While
this
keeps
the
kids
moving
they
are
quite
anxious
to
get
our
ac)veboard
back
because
they
miss
the
visuals
and
music.Pa@
(1st
grade)Kindergartners,
and
Kindergarten
teachers,
love
activity
breaks!
I
use
them
at
the
end
of
our
morning
meeting,
as
a
transition
between
activities
or
whenever
my
children
need
to
move.

They
are
quick,
fun,
and
help
my
children
regain
focus
and
control.

They
love
to
see
themselves
on
the
screen!

My
class
asks
if
we
can
do
the
activity
breaks
of
our
Book
Buddies,
other
Kindergarten
classes
and
teachers.

I
try
to
incorporate
some
of
the
movements
done
during
activity
breaks
during
our
calendar
counting.

What
a
difference
activity
breaks
can
make
on
a
rainy,
full
moon
day!Meg
(Kindergarten)
  • 10. Resource• For exercises, cool down movements, appropriate but fun upbeat music selections, and examples check out: mlspe.blogspot.com