• Save
Maximizing Volunteer Resources
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Maximizing Volunteer Resources

on

  • 1,290 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,290
Views on SlideShare
1,284
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 6

http://www.meredithtaylorkennedy.com 6

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • You have a choice in sessions to attend. Your attendance that this one is evidence of your appreciation for volunteers and your recognition of all they contribute to your chapter.
  • Go around room, introduce yourself- what chapter are you from and why did you choose to attend this session? BREIFLY
  • Here are our learning objectives. We’ll touch briefly on the philosophy of volunteerism, so why people volunteer in the first place. It’s important to recognize that not everyone volunteers for the same reason, and the best way to hold onto your volunteers is to make sure you’re recognizing them in ways that tie back to their original motivation.
  • Volunteer job descriptions are a wonderful recruitment tool. It also helps you match the right person with the right role, which is important in increasing job satisfaction and retention. Volunteers also know exactly what they’re signing up for and for what duration, which helps decrease volunteer burnout.
  • I can’t understate the importance of tracking the hours that individual volunteers are giving to your chapter. And just like in a paid position, evaluating volunteers helps both the volunteer manager and the volunteer assess their performance, expectations, and work load.
  • Share pair! What is the single biggest challenge your organization faces with regard to managing volunteers? Is it recruitment? Retention? People in the wrong roles? Recognition? Supervision? Burnout? Then, what is something you’ve found that really works to address an issue that you’ve heard?
  • Now we’ll dive into the first of our three learning objectives and talk about 11 different motivators of volunteers and how understanding these motivators can improve volunteer relations.
  • It has been said that the single most important characteristic of any nonprofit organization is the people who work within it.  At USGBC, volunteers within the chapter network help define the image of national as well as their respective chapters.  Chapter volunteers determine the effectiveness with which their local chapter carries out its mission, its programs and its activities.If potential volunteers cannot see a clear point of entry into their local chapter with a manageable work load or if seasoned volunteers cannot see the next level of leadership, their time with us will be short.  Without essential support, current leadership runs the risk of burn-out.  This is the most common challenge for chapters prior to establishing a robust volunteer program: a few dedicated souls do all of the work and over time the work load becomes unsustainable.  Longevity and expansion for any nonprofit requires a constant influx of new volunteers attracted to the mission and inspired by the vision. All USGBC chapters operate under financial constraints and many are not yet at the point where they can pay staff.  And even those that do employ staff must maximize and stretch their resources.  All chapters rely on committed hard-working volunteers, and they must ensure everyone’s skills are utilized to the fullest extent possible. USGBC chapter board members and staff must consider the motivations of prospective volunteers if they want their help.  Unfortunately, sometimes both parties are too focused on their chapters’ needs to consider a prospective volunteer’s needs.  “We need someone to donate legal help.”  “We need to fill a board vacancy.”  “We need volunteers who feel comfortable advocating on behalf of green building issues.”  This identification of volunteer jobs is important of course, and a detailed description of what is involved in each task will make the actual assignment of volunteers  easier when the appropriate time comes.  What is lacking, however, is an understanding of volunteer needs and the ability to identify particular tasks that will fulfill those needs.  Why do people volunteer?  Volunteers themselves have provided a host of reasons:Commitment to the Mission.  This is perhaps the most basic motivator.  Individuals might feel truly passionate about the mission of a given organization and driven to volunteer in order to advance it. ·       Sense of Self-Satisfaction.  Many people like to use their free time in ways that bring them personal satisfaction and allow them to develop a positive self-image.  Some people volunteer because they want to feel needed while others like to keep busy in a way that’s useful and others want to earn the respect of their peers and friends through doing something useful in their communities. ·       Altruism.  People from all economic strata believe helping others is a necessary part of a complete and happy life.  Often this impulse grows out of values, upbringing or family traditions.  In some cases, individuals might have little cash to spare and volunteering provides the only way to express such altruism.   ·       Companionship/Meeting People.  Another important reason people volunteer is to meet and mix with other people.  Volunteering can allow them to widen their social circle and develop personal bonds that can spill into other parts of their lives.  ·       Learning About a Field.  Some individuals who have an interest in a particular field see volunteering as an excellent way to learn more about it, particularly if training and learning opportunities are built into an organization’s volunteer program. 
  • ·       Creating/Maintaining an Organization.  Some volunteers are entrepreneurs who devote their energies to creating nonprofit organizations and helping them grow and thrive.  Pride in their success and continued expansion is often a prime motivating factor in their volunteer activities. ·       Professional Networking.  Volunteering can put an individual in touch with important members of their professional field or their community.  Some people use volunteer jobs as a way to make contacts that may lead them to clients or other kinds of business or professional associations and opportunities.  ·       Getting Ahead at Work.  Many private sector companies view employee volunteer service as an important way for the company to contribute to the community.  Company representatives might be encouraged to volunteer; those wanting to move up the corporate ladder know a volunteer position can be an asset on a resume. ·       Getting Experience.  For some people, a volunteer position is a route to finding a paying job.  Young people, people who have been out of the labor force for some time and people wishing to change professions will sometimes use volunteer opportunities as a way to further these personal goals.  They might learn a task and gain a marketable skill or secure a recommendation for future employment.   ·       Providing Entry to an Organization.  For some individuals who have a strong interest in working for or serving on the board of an organization, volunteering provides an important entry point to becoming involved.  Volunteering could be the necessary first step on a ladder that eventually leads to a seat on the board. ·       Social Panache.  There is much prestige associated with certain organizations and their volunteers represent an elite group within the community.  Associating with these volunteers carries a certain degree of status and marks a person as being part of a desirable social group.
  • Now we’re going to do a little popcorn: Why did you get involved in your local chapter? What motivated you?
  • Recognition!! From the get-go, it’s important to find out what motivates your volunteers and what they want to get out of the experience in order to meet their expectations and yours, expand on their talents, and keep them engaged. Knowing their long-term goals will enable your chapter to carve out a detailed volunteer path for them to progressively get more involved in activities that will enhance your mission.Determine the most appropriate way to highlight your volunteers’ accomplishments and recognize how their work affects your chapter’s mission. If could be as simple as a thank you note or as grand as a standing ovation onside at a conference– if you know their motivation, you will know how to reward them.Volunteers are a source of free labor and are integral to the running of chapters.  However, because they are not paid, chapters must devise other kinds of rewards to keep them motivated and involved.  This might mean identifying challenging tasks for volunteers when what the organization really needs is help with more mundane jobs.  Furthermore, the process of recruiting, training and retaining volunteers is not always easy.  But without volunteers, chapters would simply not be able to function, and these volunteers are a vital component of the USGBC community.Why should chapters focus on the needs of their volunteers?  Very simply, if a chapter wants to be able to recruit and retain people who work for no money, it must determine another way to inspire satisfaction and fulfillment.  A volunteer seeks meaningful responsibility and wants to be taken seriously. 
  • ·       Affiliation - this is an important factor for volunteers who: Enjoy being part of an organization, club or team Enjoy opportunities to get together with others with similar beliefs, backgrounds, goals and being associated with a well-known cause or group Don't find working alone or for an obscure organization very satisfyingYou can thank these volunteers through social get-togethers, organization t-shirts, name-badges or posting a list of all organization volunteers in a public area. Accomplishment - these volunteers: Enjoy seeing concrete evidence of their work, such as piles of finished paperwork or names checked off on a list Like practical, tangible projects Don't like working on projects where abstract goals are pursued or achievements are hard-wonYou can offer these volunteers certificates of accomplishment at specific stages in their work, continuing education or credential credits, or a special place to put completed projects. Power and Influence - some volunteers: Like persuading people to see or do things their way or enjoy showing people a better, easier way of accomplishing an objective Don't want to be in an insignificant position, but like positions where they help make decisions or train peopleThese volunteers will appreciate titles or rank insignia, a special parking spot for the month or involvement as a speaker at organization workshops. It is important for chapters to evaluate their volunteer programs frequently to ensure that there is an effective system of recognition in place and that appropriate resources are being allocated.
  • Hundreds of volunteers give their time to USGBC chapters across the country and it is extremely important to frequently thank and recognize these individuals.  Awards luncheons, a mention in a chapter’s e-newsletter or annual report, framed certificates of merit or other clear indications of the chapter’s appreciation go a long way toward meeting a person's need to feel appreciated.  Recognizing and thanking your volunteers are the best ways to retain the great people you have on board, as well as to attract new volunteers to serve your chapter.  Here are some other ideas for acknowledging your volunteers: ·       Thank you notes sent by the chapter chair or committee chair to volunteers at various points throughout the year·       Thank you notes sent by the chapter chair or committee chair to a volunteer’s employer·       A phone call to a volunteer who contributed to the success of a particular event or program, within three days after the event·       Invitations to special chapter events or VIP seating ·       Annual volunteer appreciation party or dinner·       Asking your volunteers to stand up and be recognized at chapter events·       Including a “volunteer spotlight” feature in your e-newsletter that highlights the contributions of a different volunteer every month·       An honorary lapel pin signifying length of service to the chapter or the completion of a special task
  • Volunteer job descriptions are a wonderful recruitment tool. It also helps you match the right person with the right role, which is important in increasing job satisfaction and retention. Volunteers also know exactly what they’re signing up for and for what duration, which helps decrease volunteer burnout.
  • Recruiting is the act of identifying groups and individuals for service and actually asking them to volunteer. Don’t wait for potential volunteers to come to you. There are a lot of reasons people don’t step forward: they may be shy, they may think you don’t need the help, they may not realize there’s a great role available to meet their needs.
  • If potential volunteers cannot see a clear point of entry into their local chapter with a manageable work load or if seasoned volunteers cannot see the next level of leadership, their time with us will be short. How easy is it for folks to get involved? How welcome do you make them feel? How quickly do you bring them up to speed and help them feel like an insider? How supportive are you of “promoting from within” when a new opportunity or vacancy becomes available?
  • Successfully recruiting volunteers will hinge on the chapter’s ability to provide a variety of immediate and long-term benefits that will spur interest within your community.  Volunteer activities must not only benefit your mission, but should provide personal and professional renewal to the individuals themselves.
  • Without essential support, current volunteers, and especially leaders, run the risk of burnout.  This is the most common challenge for chapters prior to establishing a robust volunteer program: a few dedicated souls do all of the work and over time the work load becomes unsustainable.  Longevity and expansion for any nonprofit requires a constant influx of new volunteers attracted to the mission and inspired by the vision AND the continued recognition of long-term volunteers. 
  • One of the best ways to recruit new volunteers is through job descriptions. Many chapters have found it helpful to develop a concrete volunteer recruitment plan with specific recruitment tools and job descriptions are an especially essential component of any volunteer recruitment drive.
  • Establishing and constantly updating written policies on volunteer procedures, responsibilities, supervision, placement, restrictions, reporting, evaluation, recognition and termination is critical for a chapter.  Any good volunteer job description should answer some key questions:·       What is the job?·       Why is the job necessary, what is its purpose and how does it contribute to the overall operation of the chapter?·       How is the job done, what special expertise is involved and what are the steps necessary for completion?·       With whom does the volunteer work and to whom is the volunteer accountable?·       How much time is involved, how many days or months is the volunteer expected to commit and does the job have an expected completion date?Job descriptions should be written for every chapter role, from board members to committee members to administrative volunteers.  The job description is a planning tool to help your volunteers understand  expected results, involved tasks, required skills and other important details about the job.  A job description provides an organized means of creating continuity in a job from one volunteer to the next.  It is also a living document that should be revised as your program changes or as the volunteer develops during their service.Job descriptions are the building blocks of your volunteer program, insofar as all recruiting, interviewing, placing, supervising and evaluating is based on the information contained in the job description. The key to a good job description is to keep it short, succinct and clear. 
  • Many chapters have found it helpful to develop a concrete volunteer recruitment plan with specific recruitment tools.  This is similar to putting together a puzzle because all the aspects of the plan need to fit together. Some questions to ask yourself as you prepare a volunteer recruitment plan are:By what date will our chapter’s recruitment plan be complete and in effect? How will everyone in our chapter become familiar with our volunteer recruitment plan and our current volunteer needs?  What is our chapter’s specific goal as it relates to recruiting new volunteers?  Do we want to increase our volunteer workforce by a certain percentage by a set date?  Do we want to fill a specific number of vacancies?  How will we monitor the effectiveness of our plan and revise as needed? What kinds of volunteer recruitment tools will we need?  Will we create a brochure or materials to mail to prospective volunteers, and if so, by when?  Will it include a volunteer application?  Who will develop this? Will we develop a phone script for recruiting and screening volunteers by a certain date? Who will follow up on every mailed volunteer recruitment packet?
  • Many chapters have found it helpful to develop a concrete volunteer recruitment plan with specific recruitment tools.  This is similar to putting together a puzzle because all the aspects of the plan need to fit together. Some questions to ask yourself as you prepare a volunteer recruitment plan are:By what date will our chapter’s recruitment plan be complete and in effect? How will everyone in our chapter become familiar with our volunteer recruitment plan and our current volunteer needs?  What is our chapter’s specific goal as it relates to recruiting new volunteers?  Do we want to increase our volunteer workforce by a certain percentage by a set date?  Do we want to fill a specific number of vacancies?  How will we monitor the effectiveness of our plan and revise as needed? What kinds of volunteer recruitment tools will we need?  Will we create a brochure or materials to mail to prospective volunteers, and if so, by when?  Will it include a volunteer application?  Who will develop this? Will we develop a phone script for recruiting and screening volunteers by a certain date? Who will follow up on every mailed volunteer recruitment packet?
  • For nonprofit organizations such as USGBC chapters, which rely heavily on volunteers, attracting and retaining motivated volunteers is paramount.  Recruiting is the act of identifying groups and individuals for service and actually asking them to volunteer.  It’s also important to remember that when we talk about recruiting volunteers, we’re not just referring to individuals who are brand-new to the chapter.  You could be tasked with recruiting existing chapter volunteers into new roles or positions of leadership.
  • I can’t understate the importance of tracking the hours that individual volunteers are giving to your chapter. And just like in a paid position, evaluating volunteers helps both the volunteer manager and the volunteer assess their performance, expectations, and work load. Both of these activities really get at something that every USGBC chapter wants to do– hang on to the volunteers that we have.
  • Retaining volunteers is all about motivation.  The art of motivating volunteers lies not only in knowing how to tap into a given motivator, but in being able to discern a volunteer's particular combination of needs.  One way to do that is to periodically poll the volunteers.  Discuss their rating of the relative importance of the motivation factors discussed in Section I Philosophy of Volunteerism.  If a volunteer ranks “professional networking” and “social panache” as primary motivating factors, you will need to make sure she has a job which does indeed enable her to meet important people and which is highly visible in the community.  To make sure that a volunteer’s employer is aware of her contribution, send a letter of commendation to her supervisor.Often, problems of volunteer retention can be traced to lack of motivation and recognition for their efforts.
  • Some chapters ask all volunteers to sign a formal pledge when they step into a new role at the chapter.  This can help underscore the importance of the job the volunteer is taking on and ensure that the volunteer understands that their contribution will have a significant impact.  The Kentucky Chapter’s pledge is:
  • But what if you’re still losing people?
  • Because USGBC chapters rely so heavily on volunteers, it is important to hold on to those individuals who are committed to the work of the chapter and to their individual role.  The best way to retain good volunteers is to make sure they are assigned clear tasks and rewarded for their work.  A chapter that is having difficulty retaining their volunteers should ask themselves the following questions:·       Are volunteer tasks and activities well-organized and properly assigned?·       Are volunteer roles described in writing?·       Is there a system of review and follow-up to verify tasks are completed?·       Are volunteers serious about their work?·       Are they committed to the mission?·       Have they been oriented and told about the importance of the work that they do?·       How are we meeting the needs of our volunteers that brought them to our chapter in the first place?·       Is there a system in place that rewards our volunteers for a job well done?·       What kind of volunteer recognition activities has the chapter engaged in over the past three months?  Six months?  Twelve months?
  • Now we’re going to do another popcorn: Is your chapter tracking volunteer hours? Why do you think it might be important?
  • Like corporations, non-profit organizations should regularly assess their performance and that of their volunteers in order to determine how well they are meeting their objectives.  To measure performance you need a reference point, and job descriptions are essential when evaluating programs involving volunteers.  Your entire chapter, through its board of directors, is responsible for ensuring that regular evaluations are conducted.  Evaluations of volunteers should involve supervisors who work closest with them and volunteers must also assess their own effectiveness.  Following an evaluation, organizations should be prepared to revise volunteer job descriptions.  Evaluating volunteers will be easier if job descriptions are results-oriented and measurable.
  • Tracking the number of volunteer hours worked is an important activity for every chapter.  Not only will a tracking system allow you to keep tabs on which volunteers are doing what, but it also helps quantify people-hours needed to complete various tasks.  This information comes in handy when you’re considering hiring staff or applying for a grant.
  • Here are our learning objectives. We’ll touch briefly on the philosophy of volunteerism, so why people volunteer in the first place. It’s important to recognize that not everyone volunteers for the same reason, and the best way to hold onto your volunteers is to make sure you’re recognizing them in ways that tie back to their original motivation.
  • Volunteer job descriptions are a wonderful recruitment tool. It also helps you match the right person with the right role, which is important in increasing job satisfaction and retention. Volunteers also know exactly what they’re signing up for and for what duration, which helps decrease volunteer burnout.
  • I can’t understate the importance of tracking the hours that individual volunteers are giving to your chapter. And just like in a paid position, evaluating volunteers helps both the volunteer manager and the volunteer assess their performance, expectations, and work load.

Maximizing Volunteer Resources Maximizing Volunteer Resources Presentation Transcript

  • Maximizing Volunteer Resources
    June 2010
    Meredith Kennedy
  • Photo: psd
  • About Me
    • Nonprofit junkie
    • Managed large volunteer programs
    • Fanatical volunteer
    • Board member
    • Gardener
    • Rescuer of dogs
  • #1- List primary motivators of volunteers and how to connect them to recognition opportunities.
  • #2- Describe the importance of volunteer job descriptions in
    recruiting and retaining volunteers.
  • #3- Articulate the importance of tracking hours and evaluating performance in retaining volunteers.
  • Photo: S. Baker
    http://www.pachd.com/free-images/food-images-5.html
  • #1- List primary motivators of volunteers and how to connect them to recognition opportunities.
  • Why volunteer?
    Commitment to the mission
    Sense of self-satisfaction
    Altruism
    Companionship/Meeting people
    Learning about a field
    L.O. #1
  • Why volunteer?
    6. Creating/maintaining an organization
    Networking
    Getting ahead at work
    Gaining experience
    Providing entry to an organization
    Social panache
    L.O. #1
  • L.O. #1
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/robertbanh/3323854557/sizes/l/
  • L.O. #1
  • Motivators
    Mission-driven
    Affiliation
    Accomplishment
    Power and Influence
    L.O. #1
  • Recognition Ideas
    Annual appreciation party
    Volunteer spotlight in e-newsletter
    Framed certificates of merit
    Thank you notes to volunteer OR employer
    Phone call within three days of effort
    Invitations to special events or VIP seating
    Honorary lapel pin
    L.O. #1
  • #2- Describe the importance of volunteer job descriptions in
    recruiting and retaining volunteers.
  • What is Recruitment?
    Recruiting is the act of identifying groups and individuals for service and actually asking them to volunteer.
    L.O. #2
  • Point of Entry
    L.O. #2
    Photo: ~Brenda~Star~
  • Benefits
    L.O. #2
    Photo: Farm4Static
  • Workload
    L.2.. #2
  • Photo:JiPs_Stick
  • Volunteer Job Descriptions Should Address:
    What is the job?
    Why is the job necessary?
    What are the steps necessary for completion?
    To whom is the volunteer accountable?
    How much time is involved?
    When is the expected completion date?
    L.O. #2
  • Recruitment Plan
    L.O.#2
    http://www.liknes.no/photoshop/grafikk/tutorials_puzzle_adv_17.jpg
  • Chapter Strategies
    Set specific recruitment goals
    Volunteer recruitment packet
    Membership committee calls and face-to-face meetings
    Committee-generated volunteer job descriptions
    Everyone is familiar with volunteer needs
    L.O.#2
  • #3- Articulate the importance of tracking hours and evaluating performance in retaining volunteers.
  • Retention
    Create a positive volunteer experience
    Sense of meaningfulness of work
    Voice within your chapter
    Connection to mission and membership
    Recognizing volunteers according to their motivation
    L.O.#3
  • Because I support the vision and mission of USGBC National and the Kentucky Chapter, I would like to contribute my time and talents to the Kentucky Chapter and help transform the built environment in our commonwealth.  I support and adhere to the USGBC Triple Bottom Line Guiding Principle.  I understand that my volunteer efforts are valued, appreciated and needed during this crucial time in the Kentucky Chapter’s formation and will have a positive impact for our fellow citizens for generations.  I have carefully considered my engagement with the USGBC Kentucky Chapter and have chosen to personally commit as an active volunteer fulfilling the roles and responsibilities outlined to me.  My word is my pledge.
    L.O.#3
  • Ask Yourself
    Do we have volunteer job descriptions?
    Is there a system of review and follow-up?
    Are volunteers taking their job seriously and are they committed to the mission?
    Have they been oriented and told about the importance of the work that they do?
    Are we meeting their needs?
    What kind of volunteer recognition activities has the chapter engaged in over the past three months? Six? Twelve?
    L.O.#3
  • L.O. #1
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/robertbanh/3323854557/sizes/l/
  • Evaluation
    L.O.#3
  • L.O.#3
    Tracking
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesdawn/2758645685/sizes/l/
  • #1- List primary motivators of volunteers and how to connect them to recognition opportunities.
  • #2- Describe the importance of volunteer job descriptions in
    recruiting and retaining volunteers.
  • #3- Articulate the importance of tracking hours and evaluating performance in retaining volunteers.