2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series                        The Importance                          of Closure     ...
2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar SeriesSarah Kremer,       Michael Garringer,    April Riordan, MP of   Celeste Jansse...
Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive:                                              Please help us    Ins...
Participate in Today’s Webinar•   All attendees muted for best    sound•   Type questions and comments in    the question ...
Today’s Webinar1. Importance of closure for mentoring matches2. Different types of closure/endings  – When is it time for ...
This Webinar Will End…      1. Programs should do all they         can to prevent closure      2. But sometimes it is     ...
Renée Spencer, MSSW, Ed.D.       Renée Spencer’s research interests include youth       mentoring, adolescent development ...
Ethical Principles of Youth Mentoring1. Promote the Welfare and Safety   of the Young Person2. Be Trustworthy and Responsi...
Endings in Youth Mentoring• Not enough attention to closure Most formal  - research or practice          relationships do ...
Different Types of Closure•   Planned•   Unplanned•   Relationship-based•   Non-relationship reasons•   Psychological vs. ...
Types of Endings                (n= 48 matches)• Ending planned and completed (20)• Ending planned but not completed (8)• ...
When is it Time to End the Match?         • Psychological distance/disengaged         • Meeting but not having an impact  ...
Reasons for Ending                   (n= 48 matches)•   Changes in life circumstances (19)•   Youth dissatisfaction or dis...
Relationship Strength                      (n=48 matches)•   Strong (15)•   Adequate (4)•   Tenuous (3)•   Out of sync (8)...
Planned and Completed                     (n=20)• Clear reason for ending• Plan for ending established• Mentor and youth h...
Strong Match, Planned Ending• Strong emotional connection  – “I love the little guy”              14-year-old Cape• Mentor...
Strong Match, Planned Ending      Different Outcome : “Two Strikes”• Strong match   – Close connection, good good-bye     ...
Weak Match, Planned Ending:         “Sort of Said Goodbye”                  Mentor decided to end it                      ...
Planned not Completed                             (n=8)• Ending planned                      “I don’t think he likes me no...
Strong Match, Planned Ending not    Completed: “It was a Great Match”                  • Strong connection but frequency o...
Ending not Planned:         Agency Closed Match (n=20)• No plan for direct communication between mentor and youth• Agency ...
Weak Relationship, Ending Not Planned:  “We just never heard from her again”• 3rd match for youth• Pair out of sync       ...
Conclusions and Implications1. Stronger relationships tended to have more complete   closure2. Weaker relationships ended ...
Benefits & Risks of Closure+   Manage expectations                        -   Renee’s research showed+   Safety           ...
Program Responsibility• Legal – risk management• Ethical – youth & relationship• Address closure process in recruitment,  ...
Program Responsibility                         25
What does closure look like?           1. Who is involved?             –   Mentor, mentee,                 parent/guardian...
Ideas for Closure                    27
Future WebinarsOctober 18 - Growing the Evidence Base for Mentoring: The                             Future Topics:Researc...
Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive:                                              Please help us    Ins...
2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar SeriesSarah Kremer,       Michael Garringer,    April Riordan, MP of   Celeste Jansse...
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The Importance of Closure

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Presented September 20, 2012 - Part of 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series Education Northwest/National Mentoring Center, Friends For Youth, Indiana Mentoring Partnership, Kansas Mentors, Mass Mentoring Partnership, Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota, Mentoring Partnership of Southwest Pennsylvania, Mentor Michigan, Mobius Mentors, Oregon Mentors and other partners are working together in 2012 to deliver this free monthly webinar series for mentoring professionals. For updates about upcoming webinars, join and follow the Mentoring Forums at http://mentoringforums.educationnorthwest.org.

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The Importance of Closure

  1. 1. 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series The Importance of Closure Sept. 18, 2012
  2. 2. 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar SeriesSarah Kremer, Michael Garringer, April Riordan, MP of Celeste Janssen, Meghan Ferns, Dana Gold, MP ofFriends for Youth Education Northwest Minnesota Oregon Mentors Oregon Mentors SWPA Webinars are held monthly on the 3rd Thursday. • 10-11:15am Pacific • 11am-12:15pm Mountain • 12-1:15 pm Central • 1-2:15pm Eastern Marissa Strayer Benton, December Warren, Mobius Mentors Indiana MP 1
  3. 3. Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive: Please help us  Instructions for how to access PDF of presentation slides and webinar out by recording answering survey  Link to the for questions at the resources, contact information & end of the opportunities to continue the dialogue webinar. 2
  4. 4. Participate in Today’s Webinar• All attendees muted for best sound• Type questions and comments in the question box• Respond to polls• Who is with us today? 3
  5. 5. Today’s Webinar1. Importance of closure for mentoring matches2. Different types of closure/endings – When is it time for the match to end?3. Program responsibility for managing risks and benefits of closure4. Tips & ideas for program coordinators Q & A throughout the presentation 4
  6. 6. This Webinar Will End… 1. Programs should do all they can to prevent closure 2. But sometimes it is necessary – and even beneficial 3. Closure should be a process, not just an event 4. Try to handle it positively for both mentor and mentee 5
  7. 7. Renée Spencer, MSSW, Ed.D. Renée Spencer’s research interests include youth mentoring, adolescent development and gender. She is a recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar Award to study youth mentoring relationships. She has published a number of articles and book chapters on youth mentoring, including ‘It’s Not What I Expected’: A Qualitative Study of Youth Mentoring Relationship Failures, and ‘First, Do No Harm’: A Call for Ethical Guidelines in Youth Mentoring (with Jean Rhodes and Belle Liang. Spencer is a member of MENTOR’s Research and Policy Council and the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America’s Research Advisory Council. 6
  8. 8. Ethical Principles of Youth Mentoring1. Promote the Welfare and Safety of the Young Person2. Be Trustworthy and Responsible3. Act with Integrity4. Promote Justice for Young People5. Respect the Young Person’s Rights and Dignity 7
  9. 9. Endings in Youth Mentoring• Not enough attention to closure Most formal - research or practice relationships do end• Think about it in theory • 1/3 to ½ end prematurely – Keller’s stage model (HYM, 2005) • Early endings• Focus largely on making and associated with sustaining matches decrements in youth functioning (e.g., Grossman• Little known about how and why & Rhodes, 2002; Herrera et al., 2007; Karcher, 2005) relationships end
  10. 10. Different Types of Closure• Planned• Unplanned• Relationship-based• Non-relationship reasons• Psychological vs. physical 9
  11. 11. Types of Endings (n= 48 matches)• Ending planned and completed (20)• Ending planned but not completed (8)• Ending not planned – formally ended by agency (20)
  12. 12. When is it Time to End the Match? • Psychological distance/disengaged • Meeting but not having an impact • Annual cycle • When initiated by mentor or mentee • Danger of closing too fast? Or too slow? • Who decides? Mentor, mentee, parent, program? 11
  13. 13. Reasons for Ending (n= 48 matches)• Changes in life circumstances (19)• Youth dissatisfaction or disinterest (7)• Mentor dissatisfaction (9)• Mentor abandonment (5)• Gradual dissolution (8)
  14. 14. Relationship Strength (n=48 matches)• Strong (15)• Adequate (4)• Tenuous (3)• Out of sync (8)• Weak (18)
  15. 15. Planned and Completed (n=20)• Clear reason for ending• Plan for ending established• Mentor and youth have opportunity to say goodbye• Impact: Generally satisfied with procedural ending but disappointed (to varying degrees) about the loss
  16. 16. Strong Match, Planned Ending• Strong emotional connection – “I love the little guy” 14-year-old Cape• Mentor moved out of state Verdean male• Planned, clear goodbye youth, 24-year-old – Mentor tells parent about end; bi-racial mentor, asked for advice about telling youth matched 15 – Multiple planned meetings leading months up to move
  17. 17. Strong Match, Planned Ending Different Outcome : “Two Strikes”• Strong match – Close connection, good good-bye 12-year-old boy• Mentee shows signs of loss matched with – Does not want another mentor, depressed 2nd mentor mood, poor school performance• Mother’s assessment: - 1st abandoned him – “Smiling” until mentor left, then “just broke down” - 2nd took a new job in – “Heartbroken” when abandoned by first mentor another part of the country – Now, “don’t want to do the program no more.”
  18. 18. Weak Match, Planned Ending: “Sort of Said Goodbye” Mentor decided to end it – “getting to be way more of … an inconvenience than, 12-year-old than something good for me” – Wanted a closer connection, not sure youth was white female benefitting – Parent does not think a connection ever madeyouth, 27-year- – Youth thought the relationship was “fun” old white Ending – Mentor ended relationship on what became their last mentor, outing, said they would still plan to talk but at time of matched 12 last interview had not – Parent said mentor “sort of said goodbye” but the youth months wasn’t really clear it was all over – Youth unclear whether it was just official relationship that was ending
  19. 19. Planned not Completed (n=8)• Ending planned “I don’t think he likes me no more… Because he left – All parties not always aware of without saying, he just left plan to end without calling. ”• Plan made for saying good-bye “discouraged me from• Plan never enacted wanting to put him in a• Impact: disappointment, situation again not saying that another person would sadness, hurt, anger, self- do the same thing.” blame
  20. 20. Strong Match, Planned Ending not Completed: “It was a Great Match” • Strong connection but frequency of meetings13-yr old White becoming less consistent due to youth’s schedule/interests male youth, • Mentor assumed youth no longer interested37-yr-old White • No direct communication between mentor and mentor, youth about ending matched 23 • Parent surprised by ending; thought they months could have made it work – Relationship unique in youth’s life – “Communication is always difficult in an awkward time”
  21. 21. Ending not Planned: Agency Closed Match (n=20)• No plan for direct communication between mentor and youth• Agency played central role – Served as go-between - communicated one party’s decision to end match to another – Closed match • Unable to reach either mentor or youth • Loss of contact between mentor and youth• Impact: Similar to planned, not completed - confusion, disappointment, sadness, hurt, anger, resentment, self-blame
  22. 22. Weak Relationship, Ending Not Planned: “We just never heard from her again”• 3rd match for youth• Pair out of sync 14-year-old – Youth satisfied with relationship female Black – Mentor feels emotional connection Caribbean is weak youth matched• Mentor stopped calling; left it up with 21-year-old to youth to call bi-racial mentor• Agency closed match for 21 months• Parent and youth upset about ending
  23. 23. Conclusions and Implications1. Stronger relationships tended to have more complete closure2. Weaker relationships ended in an unclear and frequently negative way3. Lack of attention to closure may be inadvertently contributing to negative mentoring experiences – especially for more relationally vulnerable youth4. Need for clear, direct endings5. Importance of closely monitoring matches
  24. 24. Benefits & Risks of Closure+ Manage expectations - Renee’s research showed+ Safety impact on youth+ Risk management - Word of mouth from+ Outcomes and evaluation mentors could be results reflect effective negative matches - Retention rates decrease+ Re-matching • For youth - Quantity vs. quality+ Benefits of - Funding at stake activities/events that are • For - Risk management part of closure process mentors - Re-matching+ Reflection+ Celebrate • For the accomplishments program 23
  25. 25. Program Responsibility• Legal – risk management• Ethical – youth & relationship• Address closure process in recruitment, screening and pre-match training• Monitor & support mentors and mentees throughout the match, with special attention to the beginning• Clear policies for post-match contact communicated to all participants 24
  26. 26. Program Responsibility 25
  27. 27. What does closure look like? 1. Who is involved? – Mentor, mentee, parent/guardian, program staff 2. What is discussed? 3. How are things left? Next steps? 26
  28. 28. Ideas for Closure 27
  29. 29. Future WebinarsOctober 18 - Growing the Evidence Base for Mentoring: The Future Topics:Research, Lessons Learned, and Long-Lasting Impact ofPublic/Private Ventures November 15 – Disconnected/ Opportunity Youth December 20 – National Mentoring MonthP/PV closed its doors in July of this year, but we have asked three of theirprominent mentoring researchers and experts—Drs. Wilson Goode, JeanGrossman, and Carla Herrera—to join us to discuss the legacy of their work, the artof evaluating mentoring programs, and future trends and directions for our entirefield. 28
  30. 30. Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive: Please help us  Instructions for how to access PDF of presentation slides and webinar out by recording answering survey  Link to the for questions at the resources, contact information & end of the opportunities to continue the dialogue webinar. 29
  31. 31. 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar SeriesSarah Kremer, Michael Garringer, April Riordan, MP of Celeste Janssen, Meghan Ferns, Dana Gold, MP ofFriends for Youth Education Northwest Minnesota Oregon Mentors Oregon Mentors SWPA Thank you for participating today! Marissa Strayer Benton, December Warren, Mobius Mentors Indiana MP 30

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