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Back to School:  Training Mentors for Effective Relationships within Schools

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Presented August 16, 2012 - Part of 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series ...

Presented August 16, 2012 - Part of 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series

Education Northwest/National Mentoring Center, Friends For Youth, Indiana Mentoring Partnership, Kansas Mentors, Mass Mentoring Partnership, Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota, Mentor Michigan, Mobius Mentors, Oregon Mentors and other partners are working together in 2012 to deliver this free monthly webinar series for mentoring professionals.

For updates about upcoming webinars, join and follow the Mentoring Forums at http://mentoringforums.educationnorthwest.org.

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Back to School:  Training Mentors for Effective Relationships within Schools Back to School:  Training Mentors for Effective Relationships within Schools Presentation Transcript

  • 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series Back to School:Training Mentors for EffectiveRelationships Within Schools
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  • 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series o Research o Practice o Innovation Sarah Kremer Marissa Strayer-BentonDate: Third Thursday of every Friends for Youth Mobius Mentorsmonth.Time: 10-11:15am Pacific/11am-12:15pm Mountain/12-1:15 pmCentral/1-2:15pm Eastern April Riordan Mentoring Partnership of MinnesotaCost: Free 2
  • Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive:  Instructions for how to access PDF of presentation slides and webinar recording  Link to the for resources, contact information & opportunities to continue the dialoguePlease help us out by answering 5 survey questions atthe end of the webinar. 3
  • Participate in Today’s Webinar• All attendees muted for best sound• Type questions and comments in the question box• Who is with us today? 4
  • Today’s Webinar1. School Based Mentoring – How is it different than CBM? Unique benefits and challenges?2. Tips for Training Mentors in School Based Programs Q & A throughout the presentation 5
  • Many Different Models of SBM 6
  • Michael J. Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D., is a Professor of Counseling in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio, where he coordinates the School Counseling Training Program. He received a doctorate in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1997) and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin (1999). He conducts research on school-based and cross-age peer mentoring as well as on adolescent connectedness and pair counseling.Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Email: michael.karcher@utsa.eduPh.D. 7
  • Study of Mentoring in the Learning Environment Project OverviewBetween 2003-2007, SMILE is the 1st large-scale, multisite, randomized study of school-based mentoring.Followed 550 youth (½ mentees; ½ comparison) across 20 elementary, middle and high schools for two years.The only SBM study to include large numbers of Latino mentees and mentors or high school aged mentees.Mentors were college students, business employees, and adult volunteers (half Latino). Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Outcomes: Mentoring improved self-esteem, connectedness, & social skills Elementary Middle High School School School Girls (only No No Improved female mentors) change change Boys Improved No Some got change worse Sex of Boys’ Male & Female Male & Same Sex mentors Mentors Female Mentors MentorsHowever, some groups benefited more Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Maybe what the matches did together affected how much the kids felt valued To test this, we studied Mentor Activity Logs • After each visit, mentors completed an Activity Log to note what they did & talked about with their mentees Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Weekly Activity Logs Completed by Mentors Record Developmental and Instrumental ActivitiesYOU ENTER: WHAT HELPED/HURT MENTEE BOYSGoal-directed Relational Activities: Playfulconversations conversations or SeriousAcademics (A) Casual conversation Tutoring/ (E) Homework (I)Behavior (B) Social issues (F) Sports or athletic (J)Attendance & Stay-in- Relationships (G) Creative activities (K)School (C)Future (D) Listening & Learning Indoor games (L) (H) Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Grouping Activities Academic discussion about kid’s behavior, Generally goal-orientedattendance, dropping out, activities intending toand importance of future; change in the mentee Tutoring/Homework Generally relational or playful conversations & activities that strengthen the mentor-mentee playing sports, relationship and promotegames, creative activities youth development Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • SMILE: Relational Discussion(Goal-directed Focus in Meetings by Grade & Sex)Percent of timein discussions offriends & familyand in casualconversation Elem. Middle High School Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • SMILE: Problem Discussion(Goal-directed Focus in Meetings by Grade & Sex)Percent of timein discussions ofacademics,behavior,attendance Elem. Middle High School Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Feeling valued by the Mentor: is a critical ingredient (but is in short supply in High School matches)Boys:Blue Elementary school boysGirls:Magenta High school boys Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Time spent in goal-focused, problem oriented conversations was inverselyrelated to feeling valued by the mentor Time spend discussing academics, behavior, attendance Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • The importance of balance casual conversation talk about family talk about friends Relational Interactions listening & learning Mentor-mentee relationship quality talk about school Goal Directed discuss attendance Interactions discuss behavior talk about the futureKarcher, M. J., Herrera, C., & Hansen, K., (2010).“I dunno, what do you wanna do?”: Testing a framework toguide mentor training and activity selection. New Directions in Youth Development, 126. Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Take home points• Unless teens can “shape” the program (and thus how their peers view it), mentors in high schools may do more harm than good with Latino boys• Case managers can cultivate success by providing activities, ideas, training• Mentors need training in how to balance goal/relating focus and being fun/serious Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • School-Based Mentoring Training and Support BBBS Impact Study Relationship closeness Carryover of match Linked with Linked with Individual pre-match training; •Group training; •Individual post-match training; •Individual pre-match training; •Communication with school staff; •Individual post-match training; •BBBS program quality; •BBBS program quality; •BBBS staff support; •BBBS staff support; •Helpfulness of BBBS staff; •Helpfulness of BBBS staff; and •Helpfulness of school staff; and •School resources and space. •School resources and space.National BBBS School-Based Mentoring Impact Study (published by P/PV) full report: http://ppv.org Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment Michael Karcher, Ed.D., Ph.D. Funded by the W. T. www.utsasmile.org Michael.karcher@utsa.edu Grant Foundation
  • Amys work focuses on providing training and technical assistance for local and national initiatives in the areas of volunteerism, mentoring, and education success. She assists a diverse group of programs via distance learning, in-person training, publication development, and one-on-one coaching. Her past training and technical assistance projects at Education Northwest included the Corporation for National and Community Service LEARNS Project, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention funded National Mentoring Center, and the Texas Commission on Volunteerism and CommunityAmy Cannata, Senior Service Mentor Texas statewide initiative. HerProgram Advisor, passion for youth work stems from her experienceMentoring and National researching teen courts and hip-hop youth culture,Service Initiatives and serving as an outreach and shelter worker with homeless street youth. 28
  • In her role, Rae supports YouthFriends initiatives in school districts throughout Kansas. YouthFriends connects young people with caring adult volunteers in schools to promote success, encourage healthy behaviors and build stronger communities. Rae’s work with school districts across Kansas includes providing the tools, technology and training for individual districts to implement or enhance a school based mentoring initiative. Rae has not only facilitated numerous volunteer trainings across the state but also many “YouthFriends Train the Trainer” sessions to equip school district staff to successfully train theirRae Smith, Volunteer volunteers.Services Specialist,YouthFriends Kansas 29
  • Key Concepts to Include in Training for School Based Mentors1. Integrating academics 4. Importance of into the mentoring developing relationships relationship with other adults2. How does change 5. What to do/not do when happen in SBM? student is struggling3. Ways to give mentee(s) academically a voice and choice in 6. Manage mentor activities, even if expectations before they prescribed by enter the school program/school 30
  • The Mentor’s Role in Academics• Friend and role model (developmental mentor)• Advocate• Cheerleader• Learning facilitator
  • Roles of Mentors & Tutors• A mentor is… • A tutor is… – A trusted and faithful – A peer or an adult who friend, who listens, offers one-on-one support supports, and guides a for the specific purpose of young person on a improving student consistent basis over a achievement in an specified period of time academic subject or a life skill
  • Building Strong Relationships“Relationships were built using an approach that defines the mentor as a friend, not as a teacher or preacher. The mentor’s role is to support the youth in his or her various endeavors, not explicitly to change the youth’s behavior or character.” -From Making a Difference: An Impact Study of Big Brothers/Big Sisters
  • The Results of Strong Relationships• Mentoring has a a positive impact on grades and other academic indicators by improving relationships between youth and the parent and by boosting the youth’s perception of their own academics abilities (2000. Agents of change: Pathways through which mentoring relationships influence adolescents’ academic adjustment, Child Development, 71, 1662-1671.
  • Other Outcomes of Mentoring• Mentoring has a positive impact on the number of unexcused absences (Tierney, 1995:Aseltine, 1995)• Mentoring helps boost student attitudes about school (LoSciuto, L., Rajala, A., Townsend, T.N., & Taylor, A.S., 1996)• Impact youth’s sense of connectedness to school (Portwood, et al, in press)
  • Ways for Mentors to Support Academic Achievement1. Let their mentee know they are there to support them in school and in the community2. Celebrate academic successes with their mentee3. Learn about their mentee’s academic areas of strength and weakness4. Capitalize on “teachable moments”5. Encourage participation in school activities
  • Resources at Your Fingertips• What is already in place? – School resources – Community resources – Program resources – Parents as resources
  • Close your eyes and picture amiddle school hallway. What do you see?Hear? (Smell? ) 40
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  • Mentors can be an island 45
  • Future WebinarsSeptember 20 - Closure Future Topics:Join us in September to talk about best ways to handle early October 18 –match endings and ideas for providing positive closure Public/Privateexperiences for successful matches. We will be joined by VenturesRenée Spencer, M.S.S.W., Ed.D. an Associate Professor atBoston University and a prominent researcher in the field of November 15 –mentoring. Disconnected/ Opportunity Youth December 20 – National Mentoring Month 46
  • Good to Know…After the webinar, all attendees receive:  Instructions for how to access PDF of presentation slides and webinar recording  Link to the Mentoring Forum for resources, contact information & opportunities to continue the dialoguePlease help us out by answering 5 survey questions atthe end of the webinar. 47
  • The Mentoring Forums 48
  • 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series Thank you!