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Mentoring in schools mrs. lalitha kandaswamy

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  • 1. • November 16, 17, 18 - 2012MENTOR CONCLAVE 2012 – QUESTIONING AND CO-CREATING EDUCATIONMRS LALITHA KANDASWAMY, CHIEF MENTOR, VAGDEVI VILAS INSTITUTIONSN OV 1 8 2 0 1 2 , I I S C B A N G A LO R E
  • 2. MENTORING PROGRAMME FORSECONDARY AND SENIOR SECONDARY STUDENTS“Education is the manifestation of the perfection already present in man.” Swami Vivekananda the program
  • 3. • Introduction, Contents• Mentoring vs. Counseling• Mentoring Models Apprentice, Competence, Reflective, Informal “That Mentoring accelerates and assists progress in the early stages of one’s studentship is an undisputed fact proved by research.” Bora and Phillips the contents
  • 4. MENTEESRegistrationMentee - Mentor matchingOrientation, Support and Nurture MENTORS Orientation Training Nurturing Guidelines Self-Analysis the methodology
  • 5. MENTOR MENTEE• Mentoring Guidelines • Time Inventor• Letters, Notes, Circulars • Handouts• Mentors Records • Organizers• Appraisal of Academic • Goal Setting Progress • Study Planner• Mentoring Reports • Teacher Appraisal the documentation
  • 6. • Problems Mentoring Time Mentor-Mentee Relationship• Parents are Partners• Outcomes-Tangible & Intangible• Conclusion• Recommendations the learning process
  • 7. Mentoring is a term generally used to describe a relationshipbetween a less experienced individual, called a mentee orprotégé, and a more experienced individual known as a mentor.Traditionally, mentoring is viewed as a two-way, face-to-face,long-term relationship between a supervisory adult and anovice student that fosters the mentee’s professional,academic, or personal development. Donaldson, Ensher, & Grant-Vallone the definition
  • 8. “Mentoring is a brain to pick, a ear to listen and push in theright direction.” John Crosby"The purpose of mentoring is always to help the mentee tochange something - to improve their performance, to developtheir leadership qualities, to develop their partnership skills, torealize their vision, or whatever. This movement from wherethey are, (here), to where they want to be (there).” Mike Turner the definition
  • 9. “A Mentor facilitates professional and personal growth in an individual by sharing the knowledge and insights that have been learned through the years. The desire to want to share these “life experiences” is characteristic of a successful mentor.” Arizona National Guard “A great mentor has a knack of making us think that we are better than what we think we are. They force us to have a goof opinion of ourselves, and once we learn how good we really are, we never settle for anything less than our best.” The Prometheus FoundationAct: what do you think are the attributes of a good mentor? (Brainstorm) who is a mentor?
  • 10. Adolescence, Exams, & the inner TurmoilTell the child…• Look, I Love you, I believe in you. I know you are going through a lot of upset• I know you feel a need to rebel with every other breath these days. I am quite willing to accept that. The only thing that counts in the long run is…• Find out who you are and live it the challenges phase
  • 11. “I have learned that People will forget what you did, People will forget what you said, but People will never forget how you made them feel.”Maya Angelou the definition
  • 12. PERSONAL FIELDBarriers and Fears, real or imaginedDifficulties they faceStress ManagementSOCIAL FIELDPeer PressureMedia PressureSchool PressureParental Pressure teens’ challenges
  • 13. ACADEMIC FIELDAreas of improvementTime ManagementDiscipline ChartStudy ToolsRevision toolsVOCATIONAL FIELDWhat next?Carrier GuidanceAptitude Test teens’ challenges
  • 14. DO’S AND DONT’S OF A MENTORNURTURING ACTIONSMENTORING OUTCOMES• Back to slide -3 & 4 mentor’s challenges
  • 15. To a mentee, a mentor is first a very good friend, who• Aims at awakening the genius within the mentee.• The mentor strengthens academics and areas like hand writing, presentation of work done, self grooming, discipline in school and good behavior.• The mentor ignites the mind of his mentee to DREAM and blesses him to make the dream a reality.• The mentor guides the mentee in goal setting and seeks, with joint efforts, the means of achieving these goals.• With her positive attitude, the mentor praises and encourages even for small tasks performed.• She builds up the confidence of her mentee, and believes in his or her ability. mentoring guidelines
  • 16. • She motivates the child for all round development by narrating real-life experiences rather than comparing or condemning. • She commits herself to talk to her mentee daily and meet the parents or make home visits if and when necessary. • She helps to bring out and polish the mentee’s latent potential and hidden talents. • She enriches the mentee’s value system. • She aims to encourage and groom her mentee to face competitive exams like IIT and other equivalents. • She encourages the mentee to aim for an individual CGPA of 10.“Every student deserves to be treated as a potential genius.” Anton Ehrenzweig mentoring guidelines
  • 17. Mentors are urged to remember• That every mentee is unique• To mentor one student at a time• To have a regular, fixed time and place for meeting• That every mentoring session should be a learning situation, not a teaching one• To be smiling and show interest, to be patient and a good listener• To show respect and love for the student• To study the student’s personal needs effective mentoring
  • 18. Mentors are urged to remember• To encourage improvements/performances/reasons• That mentoring should personal, social, academic and vocational domains, in that order• To allot equal amount of time for academics, family- relationships, hobbies, ideas, responsibilities and so on• To maintain confidentiality, at all costs• To talk to the parent as often as possible, and also during the PTMs• To divert mentee’s negativity or complaints to positive thoughts• To always be positive effective mentoring
  • 19. • Am I self-confident ?• Do I have a good judgment ?• Am I fair and unbiased ?• Can I take a decision ?• Can I communicate well ?• Do I get along well with others ?• Am I sensitive to others?• Am I pro-active ?• Am I alert and energetic ?• Am I good in my job ? self- analysis
  • 20. • Am I smarter than the average?• Am I brighter than the average?• Am I articulate – convey clearly my point of view?• Am I persuasive – able to convince others?• Do I have the ability to cope with a variety of situations?• Can I sympathize and empathize? self- analysis
  • 21. GOALS ACHIEVED MENTEE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT WORKING ON THE RELATIONSHIP BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS BREAKING THE MENTOR-MENTEE ICENov 18 2012 stages in mentoring 21
  • 22. THE MENTOR Becomes •Confidante •Parent interface •Understanding Friend •Philosopher •Academic guide •Patient listener •Conflict resolver THE SCHOOL THE PARENT •Partners with •Encourages MENTORING school •Appreciates •Betters •Supports PROGRAMME relationship with •Gives guidelines child •Provides infrastructure •Determines logistics Receives •Personal guidance •Social guidance •Educational guidance •Vocational guidance •Blessings for goals •Assistance in endeavors THE MENTEENov 18 2012 mentoring process model 22
  • 23. C SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION H C I Review of previous year’s programme O E Needs of Current Year’s programme O Desired Outcomes R F Mentoring guidelines Orientation Training Meetings D M Documentation Schedules I E N N A MENTORING TEAM MENTEES T T O O R R MENTORING ENVIRONMENT Respect Self understanding Confidentiality Understanding M P Self motivation Understanding Support E Clarity of thought Encouragement Encouragement A N Goal setting Providing Opportunities Planning R T Execution E E ACHIEVEMENT OF GOALS N E T S Programme Appraisal Analysis S Feedback from all stakeholdersNov 18 2012 NEXT the mentoring programme 23
  • 24. How does one measure the success ofthe Mentoring Programme?What are the success indicators ? the conclusion
  • 25. • School based mentoring has a great impact on holistic education• It has potential for building up a great future of youngsters• One of the fastest areas of school-based Educational R&D• NOTE: Every situation cannot be handled by mentors or counselors• For difficult issues Professional (Psychiatric) help is essential recommendations
  • 26. • Does school based mentoring work?• What kind of mentoring process can ensure benefits?• What are the kind of schools where mentoring can be implemented?• How far is its implementation practical and feasible?• What are its limitations?• How can the programme be further refined? food for thought
  • 27. You cannot teach a child any more than you can grow a plant. All you can do is on the negative side - you can only help. It is a manifestation from within; it develops its own nature - you can only take away obstructions. MENTOR CONCLAVE Swami Vivekananda • November 16, 17, 18 - 2012 THANK YOU!Nov 18 2012 27

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