Science news lesson module 1

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science news lesson module 1 nov17

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Science news lesson module 1

  1. 1. SCIENCE NEWSCredibility of Scientific Topics in the Media
  2. 2. Lesson 1: Objective Scientific news can be found in almost any news topic and science journalists use a variety of methods to make the information more accessible to the reader.  In this module, students will learn how to recognize science news and will learn about the role of a science journalist. Teacher’s Note: In this lesson, we will define science news as broad coverage of any event or topic which includes scientific data or requires explanation of scientific processes to understand.
  3. 3. “Time for change in science journalism?” - National Association of Science WritersWhat is a science journalist? Click the link above and read theblog post. Science journalism is not reported with the sameimmediacy or certainty as other mainstream news topics.Studies can be unfinished or unfounded and journalists musttake scientists’ best understanding and explanation of a studybecause that’s all anyone really knows at the time. Students: What would you do to change science journalism for the better?
  4. 4. Sports Science
  5. 5. Sports Science When commentators break down a golf swing or a baseball double play, they assess elements of physics, kinesiology, weather and all sports stats require math comprehension to understand  View the following and then complete the next slides with these links in mind:  ESPN Sports Science – Video: Surface Tension  ScienceDaily.com – Football Analysis Leads to Advance in Artificial Intelligence  Washington Post – Are Athletes Ahead of the Science…  Exploratorium – Reaction Time
  6. 6. What is Science Journalism? Who reads it?All of the above links were examples of sports science and science news. What type of audience is each site trying to reach? Match the site with the audience you think would find it most interesting/helpful/accessible.Children (ages 5-17)Young Adults/General Audience (ages 18-55)Retired/Elderly (55+)ScientistsJournalistsParentsGovernment
  7. 7. Class Poll Rank the previous sites on a political scale. (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 1 representing far left views and 10 representing far right) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10 LEFT MODERATE RIGHT Which site appealed to you the most?  (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 10 being your favorite) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10
  8. 8. Natural Disasters
  9. 9. Natural Disasters All major natural disasters are caused by fluctuations in climate and tectonics in different geographic locations. These events are always newsworthy because they can affect a large range of people and locations with sometimes devastating consequences  View the following and then complete the next slides with these links in mind  National Geographic – Photo Gallery: Hurricanes  Science.gov – Earthquakes, Floods and other Natural Disasters  Discover Magazine – A Shock to the Heartland
  10. 10. What is Science Journalism? Who reads it?All of the above links were examples of natural disasters and environmental science news. What type of audience is each site trying to reach? Match the site with the audience you think would find it most interesting/helpful/accessible.Children (ages 5-17)Young Adults/General Audience (ages 18-55)Retired/Elderly (55+)ScientistsJournalistsParentsGovernment
  11. 11. Class Poll Rank the previous sites on a political scale. (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 1 representing far left views and 10 representing far right) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10 LEFT MODERATE RIGHT Which site appealed to you the most?  (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 10 being your favorite) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10
  12. 12. Science and Medicine
  13. 13. Science and Medicine The public relies on the media to report new developments in medical treatments and technologies and provide social and political contexts for both  View the following and then complete the next slides with these links in mind  ScienceDaily.com – SuperBacteria  WebMD – Getting Your Teeth Cleaned  WoodTV – Adderall Shortage  KidsHealth.org - Flu
  14. 14. What is Science Journalism? Who reads it?All of the above links were examples of science and medicine news. What type of audience is each site trying to reach? Match the site with the audience you think would find it most interesting/helpful/accessible.Children (ages 5-17)Young Adults/General Audience (ages 18-55)Retired/Elderly (55+)ScientistsJournalistsParentsGovernment
  15. 15. Class Poll Rank the previous sites on a political scale. (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 1 representing far left views and 10 representing far right) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10 LEFT MODERATE RIGHT Which site appealed to you the most?  (rank each site from 1 – 10, with 10 being your favorite) 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 9 – 10
  16. 16. What role do scientists play in science journalism?The ability of journalists to report science news is directly reliant on thescientific community to publish it. The press can be manipulated by scientistswho wish to trumpet their particular subject of study, but the press can alsomanipulate scientists to support media objectives. Both parties are responsiblefor ensuring the accuracy and neutrality of science news. Read the abstract and introduction of this report  Reporting Science and Conflicts of Interest in the Lay Press

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