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Arch109 library

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Transcript

  • 1. Architecture 109 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR IN ARCHITECTURE
  • 2. Source Types UNDERSTANDING THE INFORMATION CYCLE
  • 3. What is a Source? A place, person, or thing from which information comes or can be obtained Examples: book, article, photograph, interview, manuscript, letter, diary/journal, advertisement, architectural plan, building, monument, epigraphic inscription, drawing, utilitarian object
  • 4. Three Types of Sources  Primary Sources Information in its original form when it first appears  Secondary Sources Restates, rearranges, examines, or interprets information from one or more primary sources  Tertiary Sources Leads you to secondary sources
  • 5. Primary Sources  Has not been published anywhere else or put into a context, interpreted, filtered, condensed, or evaluated by anyone else  Examples  A speech, lecture, or presentation  Writing by the witness(es) of an event, person, or place  Newspaper articles  A diary or journal  Letters, correspondence, or transcribed conversations  Artwork, poetry, and other artistic expressions  An original scientific study  Historical documents or publications  The U.S. Constitution  Maps
  • 6. Secondary Sources  Has been removed from its original source and repackaged  Examples Notes or summary of a speech, lecture, or presentation Book or journal article analyzing an historical person or event and attempting to put it in context Critic’s response to artwork, poetry, and other artistic expressions Encyclopedia article on a topic Newspaper article reporting on a scientific study published elsewhere  May also lead you to primary information Bibliography or index of primary sources
  • 7. Tertiary Sources  Commonly used to identify and locate secondary sources  Examples Bibliography of critical works about a person, period, work, or other topic Index to secondary sources Print index to journal, magazine, or newspaper articles Database (online index to journal, magazine, or newspaper articles) Library catalog
  • 8. Information Timeline  Most Primary Sources are created soon after an event occurs  Over time, more Secondary Sources are created
  • 9. Information Timeline: Secondary Sources Detail
  • 10. Finding Sources HOW TO LOCATE THE INFORMATION YOU NEED
  • 11. Where Do I Find… PRIMARY SOURCES  Library’s Catalog  Library’s Databases  ARTstor  Print Indexes  Archives  Historical Societies  Manuscript Collections  Museums  Embedded in Secondary Sources SECONDARY SOURCES Library’s Catalog Library’s Databases  JSTOR  Arts & Humanities Citation Index  Project MUSE Bibliographies Print Indexes
  • 12. Research Guides http://libguides.sdstate.edu/architecture http://libguides.sdstate.edu/arch109
  • 13. Briggs Map Collection  Selected full-size maps are available in the Library  Maps are organized by collection USGS topographical maps Sanborn Fire Insurance maps NGA (formerly DMA) nautical charts Border Patrol maps And more  Collections are arranged by call number or alphabetically
  • 14. Searching JSTOR  More than 1,400 scholarly journals from over 50 academic disciplines  Includes scholarly journals, conference proceedings, primary source materials, and (as of 2012) books  Access JSTOR through the Architecture Research Guides or the Library’s Databases A-Z List JSTOR
  • 15. Citing Sources GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT’S DUE
  • 16. Why do we cite sources? What is the purpose of citation? What benefit does it have?
  • 17. Reasons to Cite  Demonstrate your integrity and skill as a responsible participant in your field  Lend authority to your work by relating your ideas to those of other researchers  Help readers understand the context of your argument and locate other sources on the topic  Give the author credit for their work – research and publication are labor intensive!
  • 18. Scholarly Communication Research Builds on the Work of Others
  • 19. Scholarly Communication  Conversations Build Over Time  Take Part in the Conversation
  • 20. Parts of a Citation
  • 21. MLA and Chicago Style  Murphy, Cullen. "Women and the Bible." Atlantic Monthly Aug. 1993: 39-64. Print.  (Murphy 42)  Murphy, Cullen. "Women and the Bible." Atlantic Monthly 272, no. 2 (1993): 39-64.  1. Cullen Murphy, "Women and the Bible," Atlantic Monthly 272, no. 2 (1993): 39-64.  2. Murphy, "Women and the Bible," 42.  Murphy, Cullen, 1993. "Women and the Bible." Atlantic Monthly 272 (2): 39- 64.  (Murphy 1993, 42)
  • 22. Online Citation Help http://libguides. sdstate.edu/ML AStyle Purdue Owl http://libguides. sdstate.edu/citi ng MLA CHICAGO

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