Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Alphas
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Alphas

1,481
views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,481
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Alphabets and Their Sounds                                                                                                                           
  • 2. Consonants VS. Vowels 5 main vowels in the English language: Consonants: All other letters that are not vowels. * b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, M, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, y, z *
  • 3. Vowels, a closer look…
  • 4. Phonemes are the smallest unit of sound in a word. For example: The word “ big ” in Big Bird has 3 phonemes… /b/, /i/, /g/ The word “ bird ” is a little more tricky. How many phonemes can you Recognize in the word “ bird ”? Big Bird
  • 5. Phonemes can be anywhere throughout the word… In the word “hat”, the first phoneme is /h/. In the word “cow”, the middle phoneme is /o/. In the word “can”, the last phoneme is /n/.
  • 6. Phonemes may consist of more than one letter… In the word “ sh oe”, the / sh / is a phoneme. Can you find a phoneme in the word “clock” that consists of more than one letter?
  • 7. Some phonemes may sound like other phonemes, depending on their usage.                             Example: In the word “cat”, the /c/ can be Mistaken for the phoneme /k/. Another example, in the word “phone”, the /ph/ can be mistaken for the phoneme /f/.
  • 8. Blending VS. Segmenting Segmenting: Being able to break apart a word into phonemes. Blending: Being able to put phonemes together to form words. BAT = B + A + T VS. B + A + T = BAT
  • 9. Let’s practice!
    • Name the first phoneme in each of the following words:
    • Ball
    • Dog
    • Cake
    • Name the middle phoneme in each of the following words:
    • Cat
    • Box
    • Rice
    • Name the last phoneme in each of the following words:
    • Blanket
    • Bag
    • End
  • 10. … Practice continued
    • Break the following words apart into their phonemes:
    • Cord
    • Fan
    • Lamp
    • Blend the following phonemes together to form a word:
    • /m/ + /a/ + /t/
    • /d/ + /e/ + /n/
    • /ch/ + /i/ + /ck/
  • 11. Great Job Everyone! Next time we are going to learn about Putting words together to form sentences !