Media Analysis Presentation Report
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Media Analysis Presentation Report

on

  • 1,125 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,125
Views on SlideShare
1,125
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Media Analysis Presentation Report Document Transcript

  • 1. Melinda  Smith   16537529     Media  Analysis,  101719   Tutorial  Presentation  Report       Alice  in  Wonderland  (2010).  Source:  IMDB  (2010).    Tim  Burton’s  recently  released  adaptation  of  the  story  Alice  in  Wonderland  diverts  from  previous  portrayals  of  this  narrative,  extending  and  altering  its  focus  to  more  greatly  reflect  current  contexts.  In  order  to  create  discussion  around  this  film  in  its  broader  social,  cultural  and  media  contexts  we  may  investigate  the  filmic  choices  that  have  been  made  and  how  these  are  reflected  in  the  specific  elements  of  the  film.  Through  a  process  of  decoding  and  deconstruction  we  may  come  to  understand  that  “the  reader  is  as  important  as  the  writer  in  the  production  of  meaning”  (Hall,  1997,  p.33)  and  that  we  actively  interpret  a  matrix  of  different  elements  according  to  cultural  and  individual  qualities  as  part  of  the  ‘media  matrix’  (Dallow,  2010).      In  order  to  explore  these  themes  we  may  focus  in  on  one  character  in  particular,  the  Mad  Hatter,  and  more  specifically  on  the  qualities  and  themes  that  surround  this  character  and  why  he  is  the  main  focus  of  the  2010  film  adaptation.  It  was  mentioned  in  the  class  discussion  that  there  are  two  strands  of  thought  relating  to  this;  the  role  of  the  character  and  the  role  of  the  actor.  The  character  can  be  described  as  crazy  and  erratic  and  this  was  described  by  the  class  as  reflecting  the  current  social  context,  while  his  eccentric  dress  and  individualistic  style  was  also  described  as  reflecting  social  and  fashion  trends.  This  shift  in  character  focus  was  also  identified  as  an  attempt  to  be  new,  while  it  may  also  be  related  to  the  concept  of  Alice  as  being  worn  out  and  of  greater  relevance  to  the  context  of  the  original  novel,  rather  than  the  current  context.  This  shifting  focus  reflects  what  Shohat  and  Stam  (1996)  refer  to  as  how  “perception  itself  is  embedded  in  history.  The  same  filmic  images  or  sounds  provoke  distinct  reverberations  for  different  communities”  (p.163).    
  • 2. Melinda  Smith   16537529    The  second  strand  of  thought  relates  to  the  actor  Johnny  Depp  and  concepts  of  commoditisation  and  meta-­‐narratives.  As  Depp  is  a  well-­‐known  actor  his  image  can  be  said  to  be  of  much  greater  value  than  the  relatively  unknown  Mia  who  plays  Alice.  As  he  is  featured  in  several  other  films  and  has  developed  a  high  Hollywood  status,  this  actor  also  carries  with  him  a  meta-­‐narrative,  a  series  of  ideas,  themes  and  connotations,  which  form  pre-­‐existing  expectations  that  will  influence  the  way  we  relate  to  and  interpret  this  character.  Similarly,  the  director  Tim  Burton  also  has  a  set  of  texts  which  he  has  created  and  that  are  associated  with  his  name.  It  is  by  investigating  questions  such  as  these  that  we  may  examine  films  on  their  structural  level  to  better  understand  how  and  why  particular  filmic  choices  are  made  and  their  implications  more  broadly.  Another  layer  is  added  to  this  when  we  consider  the  range  of  films  that  Burton  and  Depp  have  worked  together  on  in  the  past,  including  Charlie  and  the  Chocolate  Factory  (2005)  and  Edward  Scissorhands  (1990),  and  which  have  created  a  set  of  expectations  regarding  the  individualistic  and  expressive  nature  of  the  character  of  the  Mad  Hatter.  This  matrix  of  discourses  and  the  associated  ideas  reflect  the  way  that  films  “tell  us  about  current  ideologies  of  media  culture  and  consumer  society”  (Dallow,  2010).                                                                                        Charlie  and  the  Chocolate  Factory  (2005).  Source:  Show  Biz  Spy  (2009)                                                        Edward  Scissorhands  (1990).  Source:  Kaminski  (2009)    As  we  interpret  images  we  are  actively  decoding  through  associations,  where  “much  of  the  meaning  potential  in  visual  communication  comes  from  metaphorical  association”  (Machin,  2009,  p.186).  This  is  evident  as  we  deconstruct  the  signs  within  a  specific  scene  from  the  film,  the  Tea  Party,  which  reflects  the  first  time  that  Alice  and  the  Mad  Hatter  interact  in  the  film.  In  the  discussion  we  identified  cinematic  techniques,  such  as  the  large  and  centred  size  of  the  Mad  Hatter,  who  often  stares  out  to  the  audience  with  large  eyes-­‐  an  image  that  is  enhanced  with  the  layering  of  3D.  Colouring  is  also  important  and  his  bright  orange  hair  and  make-­‐up  causes  this  character  to  stand  out  against  a  grey  background.  The  camera  also  seems  to  follow  this  character  and  shift  and  change  in  a  way  that  reflects  this  upside-­‐down  world,  which  in  turn  reflects  the  very  nature  of  the  film  watching  experience  as  we  allow  ourselves  to  be  pulled  into  this  filmic  world.      
  • 3. Melinda  Smith   16537529       Alice  in  Wonderland  (2010):  Tea  Party  Scene.  Source:  Disney  Movie  Trailers  (2010).    We  also  briefly  discussed  the  qualities  of  3D  as  it  attempts  to  make  this  medium  of  film  more  dynamic,  new  and  engaging  in  order  to  immerse  audiences  in  the  story  and  forget  the  very  structures  and  forms  through  which  we  are  actively  constructing  meaning.  There  is  a  paradox  that  exists  in  3D,  where  this  layering  attempts  to  make  this  experience  more  real  as  we  engage  with  rather  ‘unreal’  worlds.  Peter  also  described  the  role  of  3D  as  part  of  broader  political  discourses  as  cinema  attempts  to  remain  ahead  of  home  viewing  experience.  This  rivalry  is  evident  in  the  recent  advancement  of  television  to  3D  viewing  and  remains  a  dynamic  and  continually  developing  element  of  these  visual  media  forms.      It  is  important  also  to  note  the  processes  of  globalisation  that  take  place  as  this  typically  Hollywood  Disney  texts  is  interpreted  and  decoded  by  different  cultures;  as  well  as  on  an  individual  level.  As  Hedetoft  (2000)  notes,  “Contemporary  cinema,  like  all  other  types  of  visual  mass  communication,  is  increasingly  embedded  in  discourses  of  globalisation”  (p.278).  Notions  of  globalisation  are  relevant  to  this  film  because  of  its  international  release  and  its  interactions  as  an  originally  British  story  with  an  American  director,  a  British  Premier,  and  Australian,  American  and  British  lead  actors.      Familiarity  with  Hollywood  films  allows  us  to  deconstruct  this  film  according  to  norms  and  cues  and  means  that  with  this  set  of  pre-­‐existing  images  and  ideas  “a  spectator  comes  prepared  to  make  sense  of  a  narrative  film”  (Bordwell  &  Thompson,  1993,  p.90).  These  films  reflect  American  values  and  ideas  but  have  also  been  adapted  by  audiences  to  their  own  culture  through  interpretation.  Through  processes  of  globalisation  there  is  a  cultural  matrix  that  is  created,  which  consists  of  different  layers  and  relationships  between  cultural  elements.  Some  of  these  may  include  the  personal  way  in  which  we  have  come  into  the  meaning  with  the  story,  whether  it  was  being  read  the  story  as  a  child,  as  well  as  the  way  that  this  story  has  been  referenced  and  integrated  into  all  other  types  of  media  and  the  cultural  sources  and  roles  of  
  • 4. Melinda  Smith   16537529    these.  Burton  himself  was  quoted  as  saying  “I  knew  more  about  [Alice  in  Wonderland]  from  listening  to  music  and  bands  and  other  illustrators  who  would  incorporate  that  imagery  into  their  work”.  It  is  important  to  investigate  these  and  how  they  have  contributed  to  our  interpretations.  This  may  be  an  interesting  point  for  further  research  and  discussion.    Therefore,  there  are  many  discourses  at  work  within  this  film  and  these  interact  within  a  social,  cultural  and  political  matrix.  By  creating  discussion  around  specific  elements  of  the  film  we  may  come  to  understand  the  different  levels  and  relationships  between  these  and  the  active  processes  of  perception  and  globalisation  within  this  dynamic  and  constantly  developing  media  narrative  form.                                                          
  • 5. Melinda  Smith   16537529     References     Bordwell,  D  &  Thompson,  K.  (1993).  Film  Art:  An  Introduction.  4th  Edn.  New  York:  McGraw  Hill.   Burton,  T.  (1990).  Edward  Scissorhands.  US:  Twentieth  Century  Fox  Film  Corporation.     Burton,  T.  (2005).  Charlie  and  the  Chocolate  Factory.  US:  Warner  Bros  Pictures.     Burton,  T.  (2010).  Alice  in  Wonderland.  US:  Walt  Disney  Pictures.   Dallow,  P.  (2010,  March  9).Celluloid  Fantasies.  From  Media  Analysis:  Lecture  Week  2.     Dallow,  P.  (2010,  April  27).  From  Visual  to  Virtual.  From  Media  Analysis:  Lecture  Week  9.   Disney  Movie  Trailers.  (2010).  Alice  in  Wonderland:  Tea  Party.  YouTube.  Retrieved  from  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBmLViALjhk.     Hall,  S.  (1997).  ‘The  Work  of  Representation,’  pp.15-­‐64  in  Stuart  (Ed.)  (1997).  Representation:  Cultural  Representations  and  Signifying  Practices.  London:  Sage.   IMDB  (2010).  Alice  in  Wonderland:  2010.  The  Internet  Movie  Database.  Retrieved  from  http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2237566464/.   Kaminski,  D.  (2009,  April  4).  Tim  Burton’s  Alice  in  Wonderland:  Movie  Trailers.  Hollywood  Actor  Prep.  Retrieved  from  http://www.hollywoodactorprep.com/blog/wp-­‐content/uploads/2009/07/edwardscissorhands.jpg   Hedetoft,  U.  (2000).  ‘Contemporary  Cinema:  Between  cultural  globalisation  and  national  interpretation,’  Ch  17,  pp.278-­‐297  in  Hjort,  Mette  &  MacKenzie,  Scott  (Eds.).  (2000).  Cinema  and  Nation.  London:  Routledge.    
  • 6. Melinda  Smith   16537529     Machin,  D.  (2009).  Multimodality  and  theories  of  the  visual,’  pp.  15-­‐64  in  Jewitt,  C.  (Ed.)  (2009).  The  Routledge  Handbook  of  Multimodal  Analysis.  London:  Routledge.     Shohat,  E.  &  Stam,  R.  (1996).  ‘From  Imperial  to  the  Transnational  Imaginary:  Media  Spectatorship  in  the  Age  of  Globalisation.’  In  R.  Wilson  &  W.  Dissanayke.  (Eds.)  (1996).  Global/Local:Cultural  Production  and  the  Transnational  Imaginary.  NC:  Duke  University  Press.     Show  Biz  Spy.  (2009).  Michael  Jackson  Didn’t  Inspire  Johnny  Depp’s  Willy  Wonka.  Show  Biz  Spy.  Retrieved  from  http://www.showbizspy.com/article/188675/.