Media Analysis Essay

  • 3,155 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,155
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.       Media  Analysis,  101719     Major Essay     Autumn  2010                  
  • 2. Synopsis    This  paper  seeks  to  create  discussion  around  the  film  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  and  other  films  representing  Indigenous  Australians  in  order  to  explore  the  tension  that  exists  between  local  and  global  audiences  and  filmmaking  and  the  social,  political  and  cultural  discourses  within  which  these  interact,  both  reflecting  and  re-­‐shaping  these.           Process  Report    This  research  task  allowed  me  to  learn  more  about  the  representation  of  Aboriginal  people  through  the  media  and  the  impact  this  may  have  on  their  realities,  the  way  this  both  contributes  to  and  reflects  broader  social,  cultural  and  political  movements  of  the  time.  This  allowed  me  to  understand  the  importance  of  firmly  placing  media  forms  within  their  context  in  order  to  understand  how  and  why  they  have  the  qualities  they  do  and  how  these  affect  us,  the  audience.  It  was  exciting  to  learn  about  the  origins  of  the  film  and  to  understand  how  these  also  impact  on  the  final  product,  while  this  also  allowed  me  to  contextualise  the  film  more  accurately.  It  was  difficult  to  find  any  unbiased  material  relating  to  the  portrayal  of  Indigenous  Australians  and  this  reflects  the  passionate  and  close  to  home  nature  of  these  issues.  From  this  project  I  learnt  the  importance  of  history  and  culture  in  our  perceptual  process  and  the  vast,  the  way  these  work  to  combine  layers  from  which  we  derive  meaning,  and  the  vastly  different  responses  that  may  be  experienced  depending  on  individual  as  well  as  collective  experience.  For  further  research  it  would  be  interesting  to  take  these  elements  that  have  been  examined  within  Ten  Canoes  and  compare  them  to  other  films  in  a  more  in-­‐depth  way  to  increase  understanding  and  discussion  of  how  these  operate  on  these  different  cultural  levels.              
  • 3. Tension  between  local  and  global  culture  in  contemporary  Australian  film   representing  Indigenous  Australians    Films  representing  Aboriginal  people  are  often  used  to  highlight  the  social,  cultural  and  health-­‐related  issues  experienced  by  this  cultural  group  and  to  position  them  within  broader  Australian  history  and  culture.  This  discussion  will  be  focusing  on  Rolf  De  Heer’s  Ten  Canoes  (2006),  in  which  the  re-­‐mediation  of  this  culture  into  film  represents  a  struggle  between  local,  national  and  global  styles  of  narrative  and  filmmaking.  In  order  to  understand  how  these  elements  contribute  to  the  generation  of  meaning  and  the  film’s  role  in  broader  social,  cultural  and  political  discourses  we  may  investigate  the  filmic  choices  that  have  been  made  and  how  these  are  reflected  in  the  specific  elements  of  the  film.  Through  a  process  of  decoding  and  deconstruction  we  may  come  to  understand  that  “the  reader  is  as  important  as  the  writer  in  the  generation  of  meaning”  (Hall,  1997,  p.33)  and  that  we  actively  interpret  a  matrix  of  different  elements  according  to  cultural  and  individual  qualities  as  part  of  the  “media  matrix”  (Dallow,  2010).    Global  influence  on  ‘national’  films  Independent  films  attempt  to  touch  more  specifically  on  the  country  or  group’s  own  culture  and  unique  human  experience,  a  movement  against  the  claimed  ‘universal’,  but  typically  American,  values  and  ideas  that  are  seen  within  Hollywood  films.  This  is  evident  in  the  Indigenous  film  Ten  Canoes  (2006),  which  acts  to  subvert  traditional  narrative  and  camera  techniques  in  order  to  break  this  convention,  while  it  should  also  be  noted  that  this  ‘global  filmmaking’  is  still  a  prevalent  influence  on  this  film  as  it  interacts  as  part  of  a  global  web  of  media  discourses.  As  Hedetoft  (2000)  notes,  “contemporary  cinema...  is  increasingly  embedded  in  discourses  of  globalisation...  its  discrete  manifestations  are  full  of  paradox  and  tension”  (p.278).  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  won  the  People’s  Choice  Award  at  the  Cannes  Film  Festival  in  2006  and  was  created  for  this  type  of  global  audience  and  as  such,  its  elements  reflect  these  motives  to  be  different  and  culturally  specific,  while  it  also  aims  to  be  appealing  and  understandable  to  a  global  audience.  The  motivations  behind  the  techniques  chosen  for  the  film  can  be  related  to  the  notion  of  the  image  as  being  a  means  of  representation  of  national  identity,  much  in  the  same  way  as  the  more  recent  film  Australia  (2008),  however,  this  film  takes  on  a  typically  Hollywood  epic  approach  and  can  be  placed  at  the  opposite  end  of  the  scale  to  Ten  Canoes’  (2006)  quiet  and  simple  story.    Ten  Canoes  (2006)  is  created  entirely  in  Yolgnu,  the  native  language  of  the  featured  Ramining  people,  with  English  subtitles  and  voice-­‐over  narration  translating  this  to  the  audience.  The  use  of  language  is  integral  to  our  approach  towards  and  understanding  of  the  film  as  language  is  a  dominant  element  of  cultural  discourses  and  our  main  means  of  expression.  By  using  this  native  language  there  is  a  sense  of  authenticity,  of  ‘truth’,  that  is  being  created  through  the  remediation  of  this  unknown  language,  whereby  David  Gupilil  as  the  narrator  and  a  recognizable  actor  acts  as  the  audience’s  portal  to  the  
  • 4. Ramining  people.  The  film  was  also  created  entirely  in  two  local  native  languages  and  if  we  were  to  extend  our  discussion  to  include  these  we  may  consider  a  dynamic  range  of  local  cultural  levels  and  approaches  to  interpretation.  Language  is  also  integral  to  broader  understandings  of  cultural  preservation  as  English  becomes  the  ‘global  language’  in  international  business  and  is  increasingly  taught  in  overseas  schools  as  part  of  the  process  of  globalisation.      Representing  a  national  ‘truth’  Ten  Canoes  can  be  viewed  as  an  example  of  how  “much  of  the  media  is  about  creating  the  illusion  of  being  a  direct  channel  to  ‘the  real  world’,  of  presence”  (Dallow,  2010).  Though  not  explicitly  stated,  the  film  claims  to  portray  a  ‘true’  depiction  of  Aboriginal  people  much  in  the  same  way  documentary  does.  In  an  early  sequence  a  still  long  shot  in  black  and  white  allows  us  to  watch  the  naked  Aboriginal  men  walk  past  in  single  file  in  the  distance.  The  audience  is  made  to  feel  part  of  the  environment,  the  filmmaker  is  aware  of  the  pervasive  power  of  the  camera  and  distances  viewer  from  subject  as  if  to  recreate  the  sensation  of  observation,  a  powerfully  persuasive  technique.  Throughout  the  film  the  narrator  introduces  us  to  each  of  the  characters  and  still  close-­‐up  shots  are  used  in  this  case,  while  the  subject  does  not  talk  they  smile  and  laugh  along  to  the  words  of  the  narrator  as  though  being  interviewed  on  a  news  channel  or  documentary  special.  We  are  able  to  interpret  these  techniques  as  representing  the  real,  the  close  connection  we  tend  to  associate  between  representation  and  reality,  because  of  our  familiarity  with  these  discourses  of  news  and  documentary  techniques  and  the  way  that  we  have  organised  and  positioned  these  as  part  of  our  schema  from  which  we  interpret  and  assign  meaning.      In  order  to  further  understand  the  intentions  of  the  filmmaker  we  may  investigate  the  origins  of  the  film  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  and  the  way  that  this  was  created  based  on  a  photograph  taken  by  a  1930s  anthropologist,  David  Thomson.  This  image  of  ten  canoeists  was  used  as  the  basis  for  the  narrative,  as  well  as  the  framing  and  colour  techniques  used,  while  the  people  of  Ramining,  whose  cultural  origins  are  in  this  area,  contributed  to  the  development  of  the  narrative,  as  well  as  of  the  setting  and  props.  While  this  may  cause  us  to  view  this  film  as  a  true  and  authentic  depiction  and  indeed  the  immersion  of  the  audience  in  the  narrative  shows  a  lack  of  reflexivity,  a  demonstration  of  how  “fish  are  the  last  to  recognise  water”  (Dallow,  2010),  we  must  remember  that  it  is  actually  a  framed  and  selected  re-­‐presentation  of  reality.  While  audiences  “don’t  read  images  so  much  as  they  read  into  them”  (Lubin,2003,p.136),  we  must  acknowledge  the  sources  and  motives  behind  the  images  with  which  we  are  presented  and  how  these  both  reflect  and  re-­‐shape  broader  discourses.    This  motive  to  represent  and  highlight  the  ‘truth’  of  history  is  evident  in  most  films  representing  Aboriginal  people,  including  Harry’s  War  (1999),  which  was  created  by  an  Aboriginal  filmmaker  and  shows  the  struggle  of  an  individual  to  gain  equality  for  his  people  through  his  participation  in  war.  It  is  
  • 5. important  also  to  note  that  in  relation  to  each  of  these  films,  “culture  can  only  appear  on  screen  in  a  mediated  form”  (Venicilion,  2010)  and  this  virtualisation  of  the  image  actually  acts  to  further  distance  us  from  reality.      Remediation:  from  photograph  to  film  The  first  level  of  codification  and  modification  occurs  when  we  look  at  this  photograph  from  which  Ten  Canoes  was  created.  As  Messaris  (1997)  notes,  photographs  “can  elicit  emotions  by  simulating  the  appearance  of  a  real  person  or  event”  (p.vii)  and  this  sentimentality  and  notion  of  preservation  of  history  is  the  driving  force  that  is  carried  throughout  the  remediation  of  this  already  remediated  image  into  the  film.  It  should  also  be  noted  that  “a  paradox  of  photographic  images  is  that  their  strongly  iconic  and  indexical  qualities  give  them  particular  kinds  of  symbolic  power”  (Dallow,  2010)  and  it  is  this  symbolic  power  that  is  carried  into  the  film  and  from  which  new  ideas  and  meanings  are  generated,  relevant  to  the  current  context  and  shared,  as  well  as  individual,  cultural  understandings.  This  also  demonstrates  how  “much  of  the  meaning  potential  in  visual  communication  comes  from  metaphorical  association”  (Machin,  2009,  p.186)  and  this  is  evident  not  only  in  the  construction  of  films  but  also  in  our  deconstruction  of  their  elements.                                                                                                            Thomson’s  Photograph  of  Ten  Canoeists.  Source:  Thorner  (2006).                                        De  Heer’s  Recreation  in  Ten  Canoes.  Source:  Ten  Canoes  (2006)    In  response  to  the  remediation  of  this  photograph  into  film,  the  Yolngu  people  did  not  want  to  portray  any  conflict  in  their  story,  an  example  of  how  personal  motives  and  perception  of  the  creator  will  influence  the  version  of  ‘truth’  that  we  receive.  In  response  to  this  request,  however,  de  Heer  acknowledges  that  conflict  is  a  key  element  in  film,  a  convention  set  by  Hollywood  filmmaking,  and  this  becomes  a  key  part  of  the  film’s  narrative.  He  describes  himself  as  the  mediator  between  the  Ramining  people  and  a  global  audience  and  this  creates  subtle  tension  between  the  Aboriginal,  national  and  global  elements  and  motives  of  the  film.    
  • 6. Film  as  a  political  tool  The  film  finds  it  place  in  a  long  history  of  media  portrayals  of  Indigenous  Australians  and  its  elements  reflect  these  broader  historical  and  political  discourses.  The  film  has  been  acclaimed  by  critics  for  its  absence  of  European  influence  or  direct  political  comment  or  depiction  but  it  is  this  very  absence,  the  violation  of  expectation  by  the  audience,  which  creates  its  presence.  We  must  acknowledge  that  this  film  does  not  operate  within  its  own  detached  space  but  within  a  context,  a  web  of  discourses  that  make  up  a  “media  matrix”  (Dallow,  2010).  As  one  critic  notes,  “if  you  expected  a  serious  portrayal  of  Aboriginal  issues  that  expectation  is  deflated  with  a  fart”  (Conor,  2006)  and  this  demonstrates  how  a  “spectator  comes  prepared  to  make  sense  of  a  narrative  film”  (Bordwell  &  Thompson,  1993,  p.90)  and  the  role  this  has  in  perception,  particularly  when  expectations  are  not  met.      We  can  compare  this  approach  by  the  filmmaker  to  films  such  as  Rabbit  Proof  Fence  (2002)  in  which  heightened  dramatic  scenes  such  as  the  abduction  scene  are  contrasted  with  still  shots  and  intense  close-­‐ups  that  give  this  element  of  conflict  a  heavy  emotional  grounding  for  the  actively  interpreting  audience.  Films  such  as  this  one  and  The  Tracker  (2002)  attempt  to  show  this  oppression  and  inequality  directly  and  are  the  type  of  images  society  has  become  accustomed  to  seeing  in  relation  to  Aboriginal  culture  and  history.  It  is  this  discourse  of  Aboriginal  portrayal  in  media  that  makes  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  so  effective  in  its  attempt  to  capture  the  audience.         Abduction  scene  in  Rabbit  Proof  Fence  (2002).  Source:  IMDB  (2010).    This  film  is  a  response  to  the  broader  social,  cultural  and  political  discourses  that  are  taking  part  and  is  used  to  highlight  these  and  contribute  to  this  discussion  due  to  its  search  for  an  international  audience.  In  2005  a  report  was  released  by  the  UN  Committee  on  the  Elimination  of  Racial  Discrimination,  stating  that  severe  inequality  remained  for  the  Aboriginal  people  and  that  reconciliation  was  required.  It  is  in  response  to  broader  issues  such  as  these  that  we  see  films  and  other  artistic  works  highlighting  these  issues  and  attempting  to  show  a  perspective,  to  support  or  go  against  the  dominant  thought  of  the  time,  in  order  to  have  currency  in  the  current  media  context.  It  can  also  be  noted  that  “the  portrayal  of  
  • 7. Indigenous  issues  go  hand  in  hand  with  real  world  measures  to  achieve  reconciliation”  (Australian  Government,  2008).  In  response  to  these  ideas  de  Heer  is  quoted  as  saying  that  “most  people  are  so  ignorant  about  this  society  and  its  complexities,  and  there  are  so  many  faulty  judgements  made  about  how  Aboriginal  people  live”  and  this  reflects  the  motivations  of  the  filmmaker  to  represent  a  different  perception  of  Aboriginal  people  in  order  to  create  national  and  global  reverberations.      Over  the  years  much  research  has  also  been  conducted  into  the  portrayal  of  Aboriginal  people  in  the  media  and  their  negative  portrayal  as  either  a  threat  to  society  or  victims  of  society  (Woorama,  2007).  It  is  the  presence  of  this  type  of  information  and  the  emphasis  placed  on  it  within  the  media  sphere  that  may  influence  the  type  of  artistic  work  that  is  created.  As  the  voice-­‐of-­‐narration  sets  up  the  context  of  the  film’s  narrative,  part  of  its  intentions  are  subtly  highlighted,  “Its  a  good  story  but  you  got  to  listen  ey.  Maybe  youre  like  Dayindi,  maybe  the  story  will  teach  you  how  to  live  proper  way."  The  film  is  designed  to  educate,  to  encourage  a  greater  sense  of  respect  and  understanding  towards  the  Aboriginal  people.      The  film  can  be  also  interpreted  as  a  movement  towards  freedom  of  expression,  using  this  media  form  to  give  the  Yolngu  people  a  voice,  allowing  them  to  mark  a  place  in  our  national  culture  at  a  time  when  Aboriginal  people  were  also  beginning  to  be  recognised  as  respected  members  of  Australian  society  in  other  media  as  the  Government  worked  publicly  towards  some  form  of  reconciliation.      When  looking  at  the  existence  of  this  film  within  the  media  space  we  can  look  also  to  how  it  has  been  used  and  adapted  by  others,  meaning  assigned  to  it  and  its  meaning  perhaps  altered  to  meet  the  motives  of  other  groups,  creating  a  multimodal  narrative  about  these  people.  This  film  has  been  adopted  by  government  institutions  as  an  example  of  Indigenous  Australian  history  and  the  growing  acceptance  and  awareness  of  Aboriginal  people  within  Australian  society.  Elements  of  the  film  have  been  decoded  and  re-­‐presented  by  these  groups,  representing  a  continuous  process  of  codification  and  modification  that  occurs  within  media.      The  role  of  the  narrator  In  order  to  explore  these  themes  we  may  focus  in  on  one  element  of  the  film’s  construction  in  particular,  the  use  of  voice-­‐over  narration  by  David  Gulpilil  as  the  key  technique  by  which  the  audience  is  told  the  story.  Within  this  element  of  the  film  there  are  several  different  layers  and  techniques,  which  need  to  be  examined  in  order  to  understand  how  the  construction  of  this  narrative  by  the  filmmaker  is  re-­‐presenting  historical  ‘reality’  and  the  role  of  these  in  broader  social,  cultural  and  political  discourses.        
  • 8. The  first  element  to  examine  is  the  actor  David  Gulpilil  himself,  where  in  order  to  understand  how  audiences  come  into  meaning  with  the  text  we  must  also  recognise  the  distinct  set  of  films  and  media  presence  associated  with  this  actor,  the  meta-­‐narrative  that  exists  and  intertwines  itself  as  part  of  the  film.  While  the  rest  of  the  actors  in  the  film  are  unknown,  Gulpilil  as  the  narrator  and  the  use  of  his  son  Jamie  as  the  main  character  and  subject  for  all  promotional  material  reflects  the  commoditisation  of  images,  where  an  image  of  an  identifiable  actor  is  considered  of  more  value  and  sets  up  a  particular  acceptance  and  expectation  by  the  audience.  Gulpilil  achieved  international  recognition  in  films  such  as  The  Tracker  (2002)  and  Rabbit  Proof  Fence  (2002)  in  which  his  character  was  at  the  mercy  of  white  people,  oppressed  and  burdened,  though  he  remained  wise  and  insightful.  It  is  with  this  positioning  that  we  listen  to  his  voice  as  he  takes  us  on  this  ‘new’  journey  in  Ten  Canoes  (2006).                                                                Gulpilil  in  The  Tracker  (2002).  Source:  IMDB  (2010)                     Gulpilil  in  Rabbit  Proof  Fence  (2002).  Source:  IMDB  (2010)        By  contrast,  the  lack  of  existing  narratives  for  the  other  ‘actors’  is  essential  to  this  film  as  it  attempts  to  bring  forth  something  new  and  personal,  or  close-­‐to-­‐home  for  the  Aboriginal  people  who  live  in  this  area,  the  emphasis  here  is  on  the  unknown  and  this  is  essential  to  the  interpretation  of  the  film.  The  filmmaker  attempts  to  create  a  balance  between  the  familiar  and  the  unknown,  between  global,  national  and  Aboriginal  culture.      Another  element  to  examine  is  the  way  that  the  scripted  narration  is  designed  to  take  the  viewer  on  a  journey  and  speaks  directly  to  the  audience,  “I  am  going  to  tell  you  a  story”,  pulling  us  into  this  filmic  world  and  narrative.  Western  influences  are  acknowledged  and  the  film  is  ultimately  created  for  a  broader  Western  audience,  “Once  upon  a  time...”  the  narrator  teases,  it  is  an  acknowledgement  of  our  discourses  of  storytelling,  positioning  us  to  feel  as  though  we  are  about  to  interpret  something  very  different  to  the  Hollywood  narratives  we  are  used  to.  The  film  uses  this  technique  to  create  this  distinction  as  part  of  its  motives  as  an  independent  film,  its  attempt  to  stand  in  a  different  field  of  filmmaking  and  demonstrating  how  films  “tell  us  about  current  ideologies  of  media  culture  and  consumer  society”  (Dallow,  2010).    
  • 9. On  a  final  note,  we  may  acknowledge  that  the  media  are  central  “to  our  capacity  to  create  and  sustain  order  in  our  daily  lives  and  for  our  capacity  to  find  and  position  ourselves  within  that  order”  (Silverstone,  1999,  p.114),  in  this  way  acting  to  shape  our  perceptions  of  the  world  and  our  identity  within  it.  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  attempts  to  re-­‐shape  the  perceptions  of  Australian  Aboriginal  people  nationally  as  well  as  internationally,  to  counteract  their  negative  portrayal  in  the  media.  Speaking  on  the  film  Harry’s  War  (2000),  Romaine  Moreton  (2000)  notes,  “When  you  have  art  you  have  voice,  when  you  have  voice  you  have  freedom,  with  freedom  of  course  comes  responsibility”  and  these  are  the  factors  the  filmmaker  must  balance  in  relation  to  both  national  and  global  processes  of  understanding,  acceptance  and  identity.    In  conclusion,  films  operate  within  a  matrix  of  social,  cultural  and  political  discourses  and  these  are  often  reflected  in  the  filmic  choices  made  and  the  specific  elements  of  the  film  from  which  the  narrative  is  told.  In  films  that  portray  specific  cultural  groups  and  attempt  to  go  against  traditional  global  Hollywood  cinema,  tension  is  created  between  the  interaction  of  these  cultural  and  filmic  forms,  where  “the  paradox  is  that  for  a  cinema  to  be  nationally  popular  it  must  also  be  international  in  scope”  (Hedetoft,  2000,  p.279).  Films  such  as  Ten  Canoes  (2006)  allow  us  to  examine  the  interaction  of  these  cultural  elements  through  their  portrayal  within  these  films,  while  also  allowing  us  to  contextualise  this  with  links  to  specific  discourses  connected  to  both  current  and  past  contexts.                              
  • 10. References     Australian  Government.  (2008).  Indigenous  film.  Australian  Government  Culture  Portal.  Retrieved  from  http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/indigenous/film/   Bordwell,  D  &  Thompson,  K.  (1993).  Film  Art:  An  Introduction.  4th  Edn.  New  York:  McGraw  Hill.   Conor,  L.  (2006).  Ten  Canoes:  A  Timely  Release.  Blog  Spot.  Retrieved  from  http://lizconorcomment.blogspot.com/2006/07/ten-­‐canoes.html   Dallow,  P.  (2010,  March  9).  Celluloid  Fantasies.  From  Media  Analysis:  Lecture  Week  2.     Dallow,  P.  (2010,  April  27).  From  Visual  to  Virtual.  From  Media  Analysis:  Lecture  Week  9.   De  Heer,  R.  (2006).  Ten  Canoes.  Australia:  Palace  Films.   De  Heer,  R.  (2002).  The  Tracker.  Australia:  Palace  Films.   Frankland,  R.  (1999).  Harry’s  War.  Australia:  Golden  Seahorse  Productions.   Hall,  S.  (1997).  ‘The  Work  of  Representation,’  pp.15-­‐64  in  Stuart  (Ed.)  (1997).  Representation:  Cultural  Representations  and  Signifying  Practices.  London:  Sage.   Hedetoft,  U.  (2000).  ‘Contemporary  Cinema:  Between  cultural  globalisation  and  national  interpretation,’  Ch  17,  pp.278-­‐297  in  Hjort,  Mette  &  MacKenzie,  Scott  (Eds.).  (2000).  Cinema  and  Nation.  London:  Routledge.     IMDB  (2010).  Rabbit  Proof  Fence:  2006.  The  Internet  Movie  Database.  Retrieved  from  http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2237566464/.    
  • 11. Lubin,  D.  (2003).  Shooting  Kennedy:  JFK  and  the  Culture  of  Images.  Berkeley:  University  of  California  Press.     Luhrmann,  B.  (2008).  Australia.  Australia:  Bazmark  Film  II  and  20th  Century  Fox.   Machin,  D.  (2009).  Multimodality  and  theories  of  the  visual,’  pp.  15-­‐64  in  Jewitt,  C.  (Ed.)  (2009).  The  Routledge  Handbook  of  Multimodal  Analysis.  London:  Routledge.     Messaris,  P.  (1997).  Visual  Persuasion:  The  Role  of  Images  in  Advertising.  London:  Sage.     Moreton,  R.  (2000).  Harry’s  War  2000.  National  Film  and  Sound  Archive.  Retrieved  from  http://aso.gov.au/titles/shorts/harrys-­‐war/notes/   Noyce,  P.  (2002).  Rabbit  Proof  Fence.  US:  Miramax  Films.     Shohat,  E.  &  Stam,  R.  (1996).  ‘From  Imperial  to  the  Transnational  Imaginary:  Media  Spectatorship  in  the  Age  of  Globalisation.’  In  R.  Wilson  &  W.  Dissanayke.  (Eds.)  (1996).  Global/Local:  Cultural  Production  and  the  Transnational  Imaginary.  NC:  Duke  University  Press.     Silverstone,  R.  (1999).  Why  Study  the  Media.  London:  Sage.     Venicelion.  (2010).  Ten  Canoes  (Australia  2006).  The  Case  for  Global  Film.  Retrieved  from  http://itpworld.wordpress.com/2010/03/30/ten-­‐canoes-­‐australia-­‐2006/   Woorama.  (2007).  Aboriginal  Media  Portrayals:  Indigenous  roles  and  stereotypes  in  the  Australian  media  a  source  of  entrenched  racism.  Suite101.com.  Retrieved  from  http://aboriginalrights.suite101.com/article.cfm/aboriginal_media_portrayals