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Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
Circulatory System
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Circulatory System

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  • 1. circulatory system
  • 2. functions TRANSPORTATION • In your circulatory system, blood carries food, water, oxygen, and other materials to your body’s cells and tissues.
  • 3. • Blood carries away waste materials, such as carbon dioxide, a waste product of cellular respiration. • Blood also picks up wastes produced by all other chemical reactions that take place in your cells. functions Elimination
  • 4. organs • The heart is a muscle that pushes blood through the circulatory system. • A human heart beats an average of 70 to 75 times per minute. The heart
  • 5. organs • Your heart has four main chambers—two upper chambers and two lower chambers. The heart
  • 6. organs • Blood enters the upper two chambers of the heart, called the atria (singular, atrium). The heart
  • 7. organs • Blood leaves the heart through the lower two chambers of the heart, called the ventricles. The heart
  • 8. organs • Blood travels through your blood vessels and reaches every cell in your body. • There are three main types of blood vessels, arteries, veins, and capillaries. Blood vessels
  • 9. organs Blood vessels
  • 10. organs Blood vessels
  • 11. organs Blood vessels If you were to take all of your blood vessels and lay them out, they would cover a distance of... 97,000 kilometer That’s more than 2 times around the earth! Are you ready for a mind boggling fact ??
  • 12. organs Arteries • A vessel that takes blood away from the heart is an artery.
  • 13. organs Arteries • Artery walls are thick and can stand up to the high pressure of the flowing blood.
  • 14. organs Arteries • Blood pressure in the arteries is high because arteries are near the pumping action of the heart.
  • 15. organs
  • 16. organs Arteries • The aorta is the largest artery. • It carries a large volume of blood.
  • 17. organs Arteries • Arteries branch into smaller vessels called arterioles.
  • 18. organs Capillaries • Arterioles branch into tiny capillaries. • Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that deliver supplies to individual cells and take away waste materials.
  • 19. organs Capillaries • Capillaries are the smallest blood vessels in the circulatory system.
  • 20. organs Capillaries • Many capillary walls are only one cell thick. • Thin walls make it possible for molecules of oxygen, food, water, and waste products to move between blood and body cells.
  • 21. organs Capillaries • Capillaries join and form larger vessels called venules. • Venules join and form veins.
  • 22. organs Veins • A vessel that brings blood toward the heart is a vein.
  • 23. organs Veins • The pressure in veins is lower than in arteries. • This is because capillaries separate veins from the pumping action of the heart.
  • 24. • Because there is less pressure in the veins, there is a greater chance that blood could flow backward. • Veins have one-way valves that prevent blood from moving backward and keep it moving toward the heart organs Veins
  • 25. • Because there is less pressure in the veins, there is a greater chance that blood could flow backward. • Veins have one-way valves that prevent blood from moving backward and keep it moving toward the heart organs Veins
  • 26. organs • The inferior vena cava is the largest vein. • It carries blood from the lower half of your body to your heart. Veins
  • 27. • The inferior vena cava is the largest vein. • It carries blood from the lower half of your body to your heart. organs Veins
  • 28. types of circulation Systemic Circulation • Blood leaves your heart and travels to your body. • Systemic circulation is the network of vessels that carry blood from the heart to the body and from the body back to the heart.
  • 29. types of circulation Coronary Circulation • The heart is a thick organ made of many layers of cells. • Most heart cells do not come into contact with the blood inside the heart.
  • 30. types of circulation Coronary Circulation • A network of arteries and veins called coronary circulation supplies blood to all the cells of the heart. • Coronary circulation provides oxygen and nutrients to the cells of the heart. It also removes carbon dioxide from the blood.
  • 31. types of circulation Coronary Circulation • Some of these vessels are inside the heart, while others are on the outside of the heart.
  • 32. types of circulation Pulmonary Circulation • Blood moves back and forth between the heart and the lungs. • The network of vessels that carries blood to and from the lungs is called pulmonary circulation.
  • 33. types of circulation Pulmonary Circulation • Pulmonary circulation carries oxygen-poor blood, or blood low in oxygen, from the heart to the lungs. • It also carries oxygen-rich blood, or blood high in oxygen, from the lungs back to the heart.
  • 34. types of circulation Pulmonary Circulation • Blood that enters the heart from the lungs is then pushed to the rest of the body.
  • 35. types of circulation Steps of Pulmonary Circulation 1. Blood, high in CO2 and low in O2 returns from the body and travels to the heart. It enters the right atrium through the superior and inferior vena cava. 1
  • 36. types of circulation Steps of Pulmonary Circulation Why are the pulmonary arteries special? They are the only artery that carries blood that is low in oxygen. 1 2
  • 37. types of circulation Steps of Pulmonary Circulation 3. Oxygen rich blood, from the lungs, enters the heart through the pulmonary vein and into the left atrium. 1 2 3
  • 38. types of circulation Steps of Pulmonary Circulation What makes pulmonary veins special? They are the only vein that carries oxygen rich blood. 1 2 3
  • 39. types of circulation Steps of Pulmonary Circulation 4. The left atrium contracts and forces the blood into the left ventricle. Once that contracts, blood flows out of the heart and into the aorta. 1 2 3 4
  • 40. circulatory health Blood Pressure • When the ventricles of the heart contract, they push blood into the arteries. • The arteries bulge a little because blood presses against their sides. • This bulging of an artery is what you feel when you check your pulse.This pressure is called blood pressure.
  • 41. circulatory health Blood Pressure • Systolic pressure - pressure caused when the ventricles contract and blood is pushed out of the heart • Diastolic pressure - pressure that occurs when the ventricles fill with blood just before they contract again.
  • 42. circulatory health Blood Pressure • Normal blood pressure is considered to be 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) or less during the contraction of the ventricles. • It is 80 mm Hg or less after the contraction. • Normal blood pressure is written as 120/80 mm Hg.
  • 43. circulatory health Hypertension • Blood pressure higher than 140/90 mm Hg is called hypertension, or high blood pressure. • Hypertension can weaken the artery walls and make them less flexible.
  • 44. circulatory health Atherosclerosis • Atherosclerosis (a thuh roh skluh ROH sus) is the buildup of fatty material within the walls of arteries. • Fat deposits can keep blood from flowing well in the arteries. • The deposits can also break loose, flow to a narrower artery, and block it.
  • 45. circulatory health Atherosclerosis
  • 46. circulatory health Atherosclerosis • A blockage in the heart can cause a heart attack.
  • 47. circulatory health • A blockage in a blood vessel in the brain can cause a stroke. Atherosclerosis
  • 48. circulatory health Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Heart Failure • A heart attack happens when part of the heart muscle dies or is damaged. • Heart attacks occur when not enough oxygen reaches cells in the heart. • Most heart attacks occur when a blood vessel in the heart is blocked.
  • 49. circulatory health Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Heart Failure • A stroke happens when part of the brain dies or is damaged. • Most strokes are caused when not enough oxygen reaches cells in the brain. • A stroke might occur if a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain.
  • 50. circulatory health Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Heart Failure • Heart failure occurs when the heart is not working as well as it should. • It can happen because of a heart attack, a problem with heart valves, or diseases that damage the heart.
  • 51. circulatory health
  • 52. circulatory health Prevention • Most risk factors can be controlled by making good life choices. • You can eat a healthful diet, control your weight, exercise, and not smoke.
  • 53. circulatory health Homeostasis • Once oxygen enters your body, your respiratory system interacts with your circulatory system. • Your circulatory system transports oxygen to all cells in your body. • It also transports nutrients from your digestive system and hormones from your endocrine system. • Your nervous system regulates your heartbeat.

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