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Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
Ka Hikitia
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Ka Hikitia

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A presentation for English HoDs in Wellington, looking at the draft Māori Education strategy through the lens of the new Curriculum and Te Mana Korero resources.

A presentation for English HoDs in Wellington, looking at the draft Māori Education strategy through the lens of the new Curriculum and Te Mana Korero resources.

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  • Session 2: 10.50 – 12.30 Jessica: to introduce with caveat about Te Kotahitanga. Karen: Explain the context of the consultation document. By 2006, the ministry had begun the process of redeveloping the 1999 Māori Education strategy.  It started with an initial think piece that asked the ministry’s iwi partners and a small group of key stakeholders to review and feedback on through a formal engagement process.  The document was called Ka Hikitia : Setting Priorities for Māori Education . The 2006 engagement process had three key aims: to engage with leading Māori academics, seeking their feedback on the background paper to discuss with the ideas in Ka Hikitia:  Setting Priorities for Māori Education with key stakeholders to introduce Ka Hikitia: Setting Priorities for Māori Education to Ministry of Education staff. Stakeholder and staff engagement ran from October to December 2006, involving the ministry’s iwi partners, the PPTA Māori caucus, the Early Childhood Advisory Committee, the Schools’ Consultative Committee, Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust, NZEI Māori Caucus and ministry staff. Several key themes emerged from the engagement process, including: clear support for the strategy development process, particularly the opportunity for groups to comment and be involved in the early stages of development strong support for the use of the Māori Potential Approach as a way of shifting education outcomes for Māori and as an example of strong cross-government collaboration support for the conceptual framing set out in Ka Hikitia:  Setting Priorities for Māori Education, with some suggestions for minor refinements. Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success:  The draft Māori Education Strategy 2008 – 2012 is the next step in the strategy redevelopment process.  This time the ministry is after wide-ranging feedback and input from the public. Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success:  The draft Māori Education Strategy 2008 – 2012 (Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success) is a broad reaching draft five-year strategy aiming to transform and change the education sector, ensuring Māori are able to enjoy education success as Māori.  It’s relevant to everyone in education. The strategy was launched for public consultation by the Minister of Education and the Associate Minister of Education (Māori) on 16 August, 2007.  On 31 October the consultation period ended.  Click here to read the notes from the public consultation hui held in August, September and October.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Ka Hikitia – ‘ to step up’, to ‘lift up’, ‘ to lengthen one’s stride’ Session 2
    • 2. How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? OUR SCHOOL Some have poor self-esteem about who they are, they fail academically and then schools give the message that Mäori only do well in kapa haka and some sports. Some other examples of this mentality are that the kapa haka group is good enough to be pulled out for visitors, for prize giving but not good enough to be part of the curriculum… What does that say about the importance of Mäori? What are the real signs that being Mäori matters at this college? (School 3) Te Kōtahitanga: Phase 1 (2003)
    • 3. Learning Outcomes: gain awareness of current draft national strategy; make connections between the national landscape and our own contexts; understand what constitutes effective teaching and learning for all our students, but especially our Māori learners.
    • 4. The Context… - since 2000, there has been a 26% increase in the number of enrolments in Māori-medium education; - between 2000 and 2004: Yr 4 Māori students’ achievements in reading and writing increased; - 2006, 12.4% of Māori students left school with UE (61% increase since 2002) Source: Ka Hikitia: Draft Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, MoE
    • 5. The Challenges…. - 2006: three times as many Māori as non-Māori leave school before their 16 th birthday; - 2006: early-leaver exemption rate for Māori was 3.4 times higher than non-Māori; - 2005: 25% of Māori left school with little or no formal qualifications, 2.5 times higher than for Pākehā; 53% of Māori boys left with no qualifications. Source: Ka Hikitia: Draft Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, MoE … WHY?
    • 6. We can’t wait. No one else will do this for us. We must manage what is within our control. …who will do it if we don’t? …what will it mean for Māori if we don’t? …what will it mean for NZ if we don’t? The Goal: To help create an education system where all Māori students are able to enjoy education success as Māori
    • 7. A change in the language we use to talk about Maori students:
      • Focus less on:
      • Problems of dysfunctional ..Teachers, Students, Families..
      • Intervention
        • Bottom of the cliff
      • Targeting a deficit
      • Minority
      • Instructing and informing
      • Focus more on:
      • Identifying opportunity
      • Investment
      • local solutions
      • Tailoring co-constructed pathways
      • Indigeneity – celebrate their distinctness
      • Collaboration and co-construction
      Adapted from a slide developed by Cheri Nuku Shortland, MOE, 2007
    • 8. How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT Thinking “...is about using creative, critical, and metacognitive processes to make sense of and question information, experiences and ideas…Intellectual curiosity is at the heart of this competency..” Using Language, symbols and texts “…they recognise how choices of language and symbol affect people’s understanding and the ways in which they respond to communications…”
    • 9. How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT
      • Managing Self
      • “… is associated with self-motivation, a ‘can-do’ attitude, and with students seeing themselves as capable learners.”
      • Relating to Others “…is about interacting effectively with a diverse range of people in a variety of contexts..”
      • Participating and Contributing “…is about being actively involved in communities…family, whānau and school, based on a common interest or culture..”
    • 10. Managing Self “…is associated with self-motivation, a ‘can-do’ attitude, and with students seeing themselves as capable learners.” How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT Mana motuhake : how can caring for students’ academic success promote self-motivation? Source: the NZ Curriculum; Merle Ramsay: Waikato Adviser: Literacy Hui
    • 11. Relating to Others “…is about interacting effectively with a diverse range of people in a variety of contexts..” How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT Whakawhānaungatanga – What does it mean to have responsibility for each other? Source: the NZ Curriculum; Merle Ramsay: Waikato Adviser: Literacy Hui
    • 12. Participating and Contributing “…is about being actively involved in communities…family, whānau and school, based on a common interest or culture..” Authentic learning opportunities for subject, for community, for self…. Using Language, symbols and texts “…they recognise how choices of language and symbol affect people’s understanding and the ways in which they respond to communications…” How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT Source: the NZ Curriculum; Merle Ramsay: Waikato Adviser: Literacy Hui
    • 13. Thinking “...is about using creative, critical, and metacognitive processes to make sense of and question information, experiences and ideas…Intellectual curiosity is at the heart of this competency..” What does it mean to think as Māori? Ako : what does reciprocal teaching and learning look like? How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT Source: the New Zealand Curriculum, draft document, MoE 2006
    • 14. What kinds of questions can be asked at school to look at the Key Competencies through multiple lenses? From multiple world views? E.g. Participating and Contributing ‘How do we ensure our Māori students have a sense of belonging in our school community?’ How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 1. REFLECT
    • 15. Young People Engaged in Learning - Māori student involvement in decision-making; - evidence-based PD and accountable leadership; - improved whanau/school relationships How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? 2. PLAN Source: Ka Hikitia: ‘Young People Engaged in Learning’, Draft Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, MoE - effective teaching and learning at Yr. 9 and 10 for Māori students
    • 16. Effective teaching and learning at Yr. 9 and 10 for Māori students
      • Integrate the best evidence of what works for Mäori students into all professional development design and implementation
      • Work with the New Zealand Teachers Council to set initial teacher education standards that increase effective teaching and learning for Mäori students
      • Undertake an analysis of the effectiveness of particular professional development programmes and extend those programmes to all Year 9 and 10 teachers in schools with high proportions of Mäori students that show significant improvements in Mäori student achievement
      • Make it a requirement to specifically identify effectiveness of professional development in improving outcomes for Mäori a part of all professional development evaluations
    • 17. Provisional targets: Increase Māori school leavers with UE qualifications from 12.4% in 2006 to 16% in 2012. Increase Year 11 Māori students achieving the literacy criteria for NCEA level 1 from 62.5% in 2005 to 74.3% by 2012. Source: Ka Hikitia: ‘Young People Engaged in Learning’, Draft Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, MoE
    • 18. Effective teaching and learning at Yr. 9 and 10 for Māori students. What might it look like ? What’s important ? How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? QUALITY TEACHING Source: Ka Hikitia: ‘Young People Engaged in Learning’, Draft Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, MoE
    • 19.
      • Jigsaw :
      • Identify the key principles for enhancing Maori learners' school experiences.
      • 3. Imagine an English teacher who is trying to use some of the key principles from Q. 1 in their lessons on short stories. Describe what they might be doing.
      • How are these 4 key concepts evident in these principles?
      • Manaakitanga: the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else;
      • Mana motuhake : the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students;
      • Whakawhanauatanga : the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning;
      • Ako : the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher.
      Source: Te Mana, MoE
    • 20. Indigeneity – celebrate their distinctness Apirana Taylor, ‘ Hinemoa’s Daughter ’ http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =i6BZDSRhkmQ How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? QUALITY TEACHING
    • 21. What works? Levers for change… Integrate the best evidence of what works for Māori students into all professional development design and implementation. How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? SHARE BEST PRACTICE Reading List: http://kahikitia.minedu.govt.nz/kahikitia/Glossary+readings.htm
    • 22. How will we ‘lengthen our stride’? OUR SCHOOL Where to for our school? Knowing who you are makes you proud and makes you stand up. But once we know who we were and how beautiful our culture is – you know - you were proud to stand up and achieve… to start looking at who they are and starting to see how it’s beautiful to be a Mäori person. (School 3) Te Kōtahitanga: Phase 1 (2003)
    • 23. Note on the poutama pattern: It represents the shifts we are seeking through presence, engagement and achievement; and the three initiatives of Personalising Learning, Realising Youth Potential and Ka Hikitia. The background shading represents mai i te po ki te Ao Marama – ‘ from darkness to enlightenment’. Source: the He Whakamārama design

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