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QR Codes presentation

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Presentation explains what QR Codes are and how they are being used in libraries.

Presentation explains what QR Codes are and how they are being used in libraries.

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  • A traditional barcode typically holds up to 14 numeric digitsAshford, R. (Nov 2010). “QR Codes and academic libraries: Reaching mobile users.” ACRL TechConnect. p. 526-530.Hampton, D., Peach, A. and Rawlins, B. (Spring 2011). “Reaching mobile users with QR codes.” Kentucky Libraries. 75 (2) p. 6-10SMS = Short Message Service; V-card is an electronic business card
  • <imgsrc="http://qrcode.kaywa.com/img.php?s=8&d=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.manhattan.lib.ks.us%2F" alt="qrcode" />
  • QR-codes-and-how-to-use-them.jpg. blog.jericho.co.nz. downloaded 11/15/11
  • Hampton, D., Peach, A., and Rawlins, B. (2011). “Reaching mobile users with QR Codes.” Kentucky Libraries. 75 (2).
  • QR-codes-vini.jpg. venditavinoitaliano.it. Downloaded 11/15/11
  • Listed in alphabetical order
  • Even better, all of these things can be done at the “point of need” because the QR Codes can be placed at the spot where patrons are most likely to have a question (Hicks & Sinkinson) and (Ashford).
  • University of Huddersfield Library Pilot
  • Hicks, A. and Sinkinson, C. (2011). “Situated questions and answers: Responding to library users with QR Codes.” Reference & User Services Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 60–69
  • Half Hollow Hills Community LibrarySan Diego State University Library, University of Huddersfield Library3) Kentucky State University Library5) University of Colorado at Boulder Library
  • 1) Contra Costa County Library2)3) Contra Costa County Library
  • Baker, L. (2010). “Making Physical Objects Clickable: Using Mobile Tags to Enhance Library Displays.” Journal of Library Innovation. 1(2). p.22-28.
  • a person could look at photos of students helping at the Salvation Army, scan the barcode on the poster, and watch a video of the event on their phone. While perusing books on poverty, a person could scan a barcode and see a real-time search of the library catalog for books on poverty, request books online, and link to book reviews and summaries. The person could check out a copy of the common book and scan 2D codes to download podcasts of book discussion groups on campus. Before leaving the display, the person could scan another barcode to sign up for volunteer opportunities in the community.
  • Even though the display ran for a little over three months, it always had fresh content because of the real-time electronic material included. The tags for catalog searches were dynamic URLs that executed a fresh search each time the tag was scanned. The results always reflected the latest new acquisitions and book availability. If the tag connected to a web site, library staff could update the site with new links, podcasts, or other resources without having to change the mobile tag itself.
  • 2)Contra Costa County Library
  • Hampton, D., Peach, A. and Rawlins, B. (2010). “Reaching mobile users with QR codes.” Kentucky Libraries. 75 no2 Spr 2011 p. 6-10
  • <imgsrc="http://qrcode.kaywa.com/img.php?s=8&d=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.manhattan.lib.ks.us%2F" alt="qrcode" />It links to my library’s home page.
  • There are some options under the QR Code for how to save it. In order to save it to my laptop, I had to Right Click on the QR Code and select Save Image As. That opened up a dialog box that defaulted to a .php file type, but since my laptop doesn’t have a QR Reader on it, I wasn’t able to open this file type. So, I selected All File instead, and added .jpg as the file type to the end of the default name. In this way, I was able to save the QR Code as a picture, which I could then import into PP.
  • It links to my library’s book reviews.
  • Hampton, D., Peach, A. and Rawlins, B. (2010). “Reaching mobile users with QR codes.” Kentucky Libraries. 75 no2 Spr 2011 p. 6-10Walsh A. 2010. QR Codes – using mobile phones to deliver library instruction and help at the point of need. Journal of information literacy, 4(1), pp 55-64 http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/PRA-V4-I1-2010-4
  • Hicks, A. and Sinkinson, C. (2011). “Situated questions and answers: Responding to library users with QR Codes.” Reference & User Services Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 60–69One of the things that is so interesting to me about the QR Code technology is the ways it allows libraries to intermix their real and virtual tools. The ever increasing use of technology in both professional and social communication, as well as educational opportunities, makes it essential that libraries have a virtual presence, but this aspect of the library is often hidden from patrons. As I discovered during my information seeking interview, even devoted library users often forget the online resources that are available from their libraries.
  • QR Codes provide an easy bridge between the physical library and its online counterpart, but they also provide a way to link different online tools. Including QR Codes in an online catalog, for example, makes accessing related items, bibliographies, or outside websites incredibly easy.
  • It is also important to think about how to balance the use of QR Codes with non-technological help services, since QR Codes are only accessible to patrons who already possess the right technology. All of the articles I read about QR Codes pointed to this digital divide.

Transcript

  • 1. Quick Response Codes allow users to scan a two dimensional barcode and receive A LOT of information.
  • 2.  A QR Code is a matrix barcode that is readable with a smartphone or other mobile phone with a camera.  QR Code stands for Quick Response Code, because they access information immediately.  They can also be called 2D Codes, 2D Barcodes, Matrix Code, and Mobile Codes.
  • 3.  They were invented in 1994 in Japan by Denso-Wave, a Toyota subsidiary.  Denso-Wave holds the patent to QR Code technology, but they decided to make the technology freely available to the public.  QR Codes have been widely used in Japan for years (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins).
  • 4.  One QR Code can hold up to: ◦ 7,089 Numeric Only Characters ◦ 4,296 Alphanumberic Characters ◦ 2,953 Binary (8 bits) Bytes ◦ 1,817 Kanji Characters (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins)  QR Codes can link to: ◦ URLs ◦ Phone numbers ◦ Instant Messaging or SMS messaging services ◦ V-cards (electronic business cards)  They can also be encoded with text (Ashford)
  • 5.  Have you tried scanning one?
  • 6.  Commercial Tracking ◦ Capture statistics on who has scanned  Logistics ◦ Tracking mailed items  Inventory Control  Advertising ◦ Embedding product and warranty information  Air Travel ◦ Boarding Passes  Museums ◦ Virtual Tours (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins)
  • 7.  Many phones now have QR Code Readers already installed on them.  If your phone has a QR Code Reader, simply take a photo of the QR Code and the embedded information will appear on your camera.
  • 8.  If you have a phone, with a camera, that doesn’t have a QR Code Reader. . .  You can get one easily, usually for free, from multiple online sites.
  • 9. ◦ BeeTag: http://www.beetagg.com/en/ ◦ Kaywa: http://www.kaywa.com/ ◦ Microsoft Tag: http://tag.microsoft.com/home.aspx ◦ Nokia Mobile: http://mobilecodes.nokia.com/scan.htm ◦ QuickMark: http://www.quickmark.com.tw/En/basic/index.asp ◦ UpCode: http://www.upcode.com/
  • 10. While, QR Codes are cool in their own right, they actually have lots of library uses:  Information Literacy Education  Basic Tools Education  Information Seeking  Reader’s Advisory  Displays  Marketing  Even Shelving
  • 11.  Link to instructional videos  Link to authoritative electronic resources  Link to a quiz that tests and reinforce knowledge learned  Link to in depth print instructions  Link print materials to online resources on the same topic, such as: ◦ Previous Editions ◦ Educational and Government Websites ◦ Podcasts (Walsh)
  • 12.  Layafette College Library created a game utilizing QR Codes that “that teaches participants about the library along the way” (Porter & King)  Kentucky State University Librarians suggested using QR Codes to link students to a short quiz to assess their knowledge before a lecture (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins)
  • 13. Link to step-by-step instructions for how to use mechanical devices: ◦ Copiers ◦ Scanners ◦ Printers ◦ Microfilm machines ◦ Value Transfer Stations  University of Colorado at Boulder librarians created location specific signs. Those posted above copiers included the question: “How do I copy?” with a QR Code to scan for the answer.
  • 14.  Link from the book shelves to subject index for what is shelved there (Porter & King)  Link to catalog record that allows user to upload call number information to mobile device (Ashford) (Porter & King) & (Walsh)  Link to an explanation of the contents of a special collection (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins)  Link to an explanation of shelving practices  Link to maps and video tours of the facility (Hicks & Sinkinson)
  • 15.  Link to Read Alike books for popular titles (Porter & King)  Link to other books in a series for all series titles  Link to Amazon for customer reviews, book images, and tie-ins (Hicks & Sinkinson)  Link to music sites for music reviews
  • 16.  Abilene Christian University Librarians created a display of books & photographs around the book Same Kind of Different as Me.  Using QR Codes to connect to: ◦ Videos of related events ◦ Complicated catalog searches ◦ Podcasts ◦ Online registrations for volunteer opportunities
  • 17.  Link to a library’s text message reference service and other contact information (Ashford)  Link to the library calendar of events  Link to renewal functions (Hicks & Sinkinson)  Link to reservation making tools for Community Use Room Ashford) & (Hicks & Sinkinson)  Link to the library’s Facebook or other online community page (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins)  Link to download of mobile catalog app (Porter & King)
  • 18.  Link to trailers for DVD s in the library’s collection (Ashford)  Link to audiobooks (Porter & King) and music (Ashford) in the library’s collection  Link audiobooks to author interviews (Ashford)  Link to reviews of books in the library’s collection, written by in house librarians, patrons, or on Amazon  Link to collection related activities, for example, Author Lectures.
  • 19.  Kentucky State University librarians always need help shelving, but many work-study students do not work in the library long enough to learn their shelving system.  Using QR Codes allows student workers, with little training, to help with the essential task of sorting and shelving books.  Scanned QR Codes provide all necessary shelving information.
  • 20.  Most of the sites listed earlier also allow you to generate QR Codes through them. ◦ BeeTag: http://www.beetagg.com/en/ ◦ Kaywa: http://www.kaywa.com/ ◦ Microsoft Tag: http://tag.microsoft.com/home.aspx ◦ QuickMark: http://www.quickmark.com.tw/En/basic/index.asp ◦ UpCode: http://www.upcode.com/
  • 21.  We’ll use this site, because it’s the one I’m the most familiar with: http://qrcode.kaywa.com/  But first, we need something we want to link to, like your local library’s webpage or even a Facebook page.  Go to what ever page you want to link to and copy the URL.  Now, go to the Kaywa QR Code Generator.
  • 22. Be sure this is set to URL
  • 23. Paste your URL here
  • 24. Select the size you want. I made a Large QR Code.
  • 25. Click Generate
  • 26. Here are some options for saving the new QR Code.
  • 27.  “Information embedded in [QR Codes] can be changed and updated without the extra expense of creating new codes for new promotions” (Hampton, Peach, Rawlins).  QR Codes “follow an international standard (ISO/IEC18004) that makes the many. . .applications that create and decode these QR codes interoperable” (Walsh)
  • 28.  “As library users have become increasingly dependent on electronic access, librarians have worked to enhance their virtual presence with services such as instant messaging, with learning tools such as online research guides, and with research resources such as electronic databases. While these services are indeed valuable, the physical library remains an essential factor in supporting the research and learning needs of users” (Hicks & Sinkinson, p. 60-1).
  • 29. Ashford, R. (Nov 2010). “QR Codes and academic libraries: Reaching mobile users.” ACRL TechConnect. p. 526-530. Baker, L. (2010). “Making physicaloObjects clickable: Using mobile tags to enhance library displays.” Journal of Library Innovation. 1(2). p.22-28. Hampton, D., Peach, A. and Rawlins, B. (Spring 2011). “Reaching mobile users with QR codes.” Kentucky Libraries. 75 (2) p. 6-10 Hicks, A. and Sinkinson, C. (2011). “Situated questions and answers: Responding to library users with QR Codes.” Reference & User Services Quarterly, 51 (1). p. 60–69 Porter, M. and King, D.L. (May/June 2011). “QR Codes in libraries: Some examples.” Public Libraries 50 (3). p. 25-7. Rigby, L. (March 2009)."QR Codes in libraries and higher education." Just Another Dent in the Damage. Downloaded from http://www.lexrigby.com/2009/03/26/qr-codes-in-libraries-and- higher-education/ 11/15/11. Walsh A. (2010). “QR Codes – using mobile phones to deliver library instruction and help at the point of need.” Journal of information literacy, 4(1), p. 55-64 http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/PRA-V4-I1-2010-4