APS 2014 - Social Media Can Be For Science

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APS 2014 - Social Media Can Be For Science

  1. 1. Social Media Can Be For Science! Melanie B. Tannenbaum! APS Annual Convention! May 23, 2014!
  2. 2. Why Share?
  3. 3. …papers with media exposure ! receive 28% more citations. Kiernan, 2003, Science Communication
  4. 4. The links that we post can help us “construct and refine [our] online personas.” People share articles on Twitter that they haven’t read. We use links and shared articles as “markers of the people we aspire to be.” Kitroeff, 2014, New York Times
  5. 5. Scientists, as a group, are “highly trusted” by Americans… ! !
  6. 6. http://www.science20.com/truth_universally_acknowledged/survey_says_science_we_trust
  7. 7. Scientists, as a group, are “highly trusted” by Americans… ! ! …but only 18% of Americans can name a living scientist.
  8. 8. Everyone that you are friends with knows a living scientist.
  9. 9. “Right now, this is an anti-intellectual country in which the media and politics constantly bombard us with the message that science is uncool, the domain of geeks and nerds.”! ! — PZ Myers
  10. 10. “If scientists could communicate more in their own voices — in a familiar tone, with a less specialized vocabulary — would a wide range of people understand them better? ! Would their work be better understood by the general public, policymakers, funders, and even in some cases, other scientists?”! ! — Alan Alda
  11. 11. This. Study. Never. Happened.
  12. 12. “Trust is not about information.! It’s about dialogue and transparency.” ! ! — Rick E. Borchelt, Lynne T. Friedmann, & Earle Holland
  13. 13. We can use our social media presences to make every step of the scientific process more transparent, clear, and accessible.
  14. 14. Step-Sister-In-Law
  15. 15. Why Social Media?
  16. 16. 48% of 18-34 year olds check Facebook first thing in the morning… ! ! …and 28% do so before getting out of bed.
  17. 17. 57% of Americans say they talk to people online more than they do in real life.
  18. 18. 48% of Internet Users use Facebook as their primary news source.
  19. 19. The Internet is the main source of information for learning about specific scientific issues Other/Don’t Know 2% Family/Friends/Colleagues 2% Radio 1% TV 15% Newspapers & Magazines 6% Books 12% Internet 59% Where do you get information on specific scientific issues? Government Agency 3%
  20. 20. Also, things like… • Agenda Control: Things covered frequently in the news are seen as more important. • Availability Heuristic: The more often we see stories about science, the more we’ll be able to bring those topics to mind, and the more it will seem like “everyone” is talking about scientific issues, setting a norm. • Descriptive Norms: By frequently and publicly talking about science, it makes it more “normative” to be involved in discussions about scientific issues.
  21. 21. These are probably the two most common social media platforms being used. However, they come with slightly different norms and populations.
  22. 22. This sums up the “norm” of how to use Twitter for professional purposes very well.
  23. 23. Facebook tends to be more “personal.” However, you may be surprised by what people want to see…and who wants to see it… This is a status I wrote, unconnected to this session. I was surprised by some responses.
  24. 24. How Can I Use Social Media Effectively?
  25. 25. Follow The Right People. ! Examples: • ScienceSeeker Members • https://twitter.com/SciSeeker/scienceseeker-members • SciAm Bloggers & Contributors • https://twitter.com/PsychScience, #aps14sf • Popular Psychologists & Neuroscientists • http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-100-most-followed-psychologists-and.html
  26. 26. Friends On Facebook, you tend to be “friends” with more people that are not necessarily connected to your professional sphere or career/scientific interests…
  27. 27. Friends • Family • Non-Academic-Sphere Friends • Elementary School, Hometown, Summer Camp… • Non-Psych Academics • College friends in other fields, science writers… • Psych Colleagues • Grad School friends • Conference Buddies • Professors
  28. 28. Friends However, this doesn’t stop you from (a) seeking out (and friending) people you do want to have further conversations with, and (b) bringing scientific conversations, debates, and articles to others’ feeds.
  29. 29. Friends You can always try friending colleagues or friends-of- friends that you know professionally. ! Some might not accept your friend request if you aren’t very close, but some will. Especially in communities where social media use is more normative (e.g., SciComm). But don’t be hurt if people choose to keep their Facebooks more private — you can always connect on Twitter!
  30. 30. Friends However, I do not want to hear anyone complaining that Facebook and Twitter are too full of people posting selfies and pictures of their outfits or lunches.
  31. 31. If you don’t like what you’re seeing on Facebook or Twitter, you’re following the wrong people.
  32. 32. What Should I Post?
  33. 33. Tweeting Well • It’s OK to “butt into” other people’s conversations… • …as long as you’re polite, friendly, useful, and constructive. ! • Retweeting Others ! • Personal, Humanizing Information ! • Your Own Writing/Posts ! • Unique Contributions
  34. 34. Facebooking Well • Not as normative to “friend” people you don’t know… • …although in some contexts, this is changing. ! • Fewer posts per day ! • More personal ! • You can write longer statuses
  35. 35. Unique Content • If everyone is posting links to a breaking news story, article, etc. — you don’t have to. • Set up Google Alerts for terms from your “beat.” • Link posts from good-but-less-known blogs in your area. • This is how you become the “go-to” for your niche!
  36. 36. Examples
  37. 37. As psychologists, we take for granted many things that we know, and we forget that others don’t know these things. Like…the fact that the MBTI is terrible. This status generated a lot of conversation about why the MBTI is invalid, and what alternatives (like…the Big Five) exist.
  38. 38. Generating conversations about how to teach students…
  39. 39. Generating conversations about how to teach students…
  40. 40. Sharing information about behavioral genetics research (which I only learned about in graduate school) with my entire network of friends and family
  41. 41. Sharing information about behavioral genetics research (which I only learned about in graduate school) with my entire network of friends and family
  42. 42. Sharing (funny) articles that convey information about scientific methods and some of their potential pitfalls
  43. 43. …taking it upon myself to present to everyone that I can what I feel is a far more accurate view of anything Gladwell has to say (see the next several slides…)
  44. 44. Sharing funny (I hope!) stories that convey both (a) the punchline and (b) a psych research finding that people now know after reading my status
  45. 45. Sharing funny (I hope!) stories that convey both (a) the punchline and (b) a psych research finding that people now know after reading my status
  46. 46. College Friend Establishing myself as a trusted resource for providing articles, answering questions, and (possibly) knowing where to find desired information.
  47. 47. Educate Evaluate Explore Audience ! I think it’s very important to go into social media with a goal in mind for your posting, sharing, linking, and conversing. ! Therefore, in my opinion, this table sums up the three main goals you might have, and what types of audiences/posts you might be targeting with each of those goals. ! This is purely conjecture based on my experience. Posts Goal
  48. 48. Educate Evaluate Explore Audience Family ! Non-Field Friends Academic-Interest Friends & Family ! Colleagues Colleagues Posts Informative Factual Critical/Praising Discussion Links or Statuses Questions Common Concerns Goal Share Knowledge Share Opinions Share Experience
  49. 49. Educate Evaluate Explore Audience Family ! Non-Field Friends Academic-Interest Friends & Family ! Colleagues Colleagues Posts Informative Factual Critical/Praising Discussion Links or Statuses Questions Common Concerns Goal Share Knowledge Share Opinions Share Experience
  50. 50. You are a scientist.! Your friends and family should know this. You have a lot of power here!
  51. 51. You can be… A trusted voice A norm-setter A conversation starter
  52. 52. People want to know! what other people know. Don’t assume you know what your friends want (or don’t want) to see.
  53. 53. If you don’t like what you see on social media,! follow different people. Post unique content, and follow people who post unique content.
  54. 54. Don’t be afraid to post things you think might be controversial. You may be (pleasantly) surprised by the discussion… …and by who participates in them.
  55. 55. Thank You!! ! Melanie B. Tannenbaum! @melanietbaum! blogs.scientificamerican.com/psysociety/!
  56. 56. Facebook Statistics • http://www.digitalbuzzblog.com/facebook-statistics-stats-facts-2011/ • http://www.statisticbrain.com/facebook-statistics/
  57. 57. Info Sources • Scientists Highly Trusted: http://www.science20.com/ truth_universally_acknowledged/survey_says_science_we_trust • Name A Living Scientist: Your Congress - Your Health Survey, June 2009, http:// www.researchamerica.org/uploads/YourCongress2009.pdf. (More Details: 65% said they could not name a living scientist. 7% said they could, but when asked to provide a name, said “Don’t Know.” 10% named either Einstein, Pasteur, Curie, or Salk, none of whom were alive in 2009.) • Info for Specific Scientific Issues: National Science Board’s Science and Engineering Indicators 2012 (http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind12/c7/c7s1.htm)
  58. 58. Special Acknowledgments • Thank you to Christie Wilcox, whose slides on this very topic (post here: http:// blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/09/27/social-media-for-scientists- part-1-its-our-job/, slides here: http://www.slideshare.net/NerdyChristie/science-and- the-public-why-every-lab-should-tweet) provided a ton of the material for this talk. • Thank you to Cedar Riener, for putting all of the hard legwork into proposing this APS symposium and for allowing me to co-chair it with him! He is awesome and it was a lot of work on his end. Thanks, Cedar. • Thank you to Jorden Cummings and Stuart Ritchie, the two other speakers whose talks were awesome and very enjoyable. • And finally, thank you to everyone who came to our talk on May 23rd, despite the impossible-to-find room, the 9 AM start time, and Zimbardo’s talk going on at the same time! We appreciate it — and we hope your Facebook friends lists do too! :)

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