Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management

429

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
429
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Module: Cluster Foundation and Fundamentals of Cluster Management Gerd Meier zu Köcker Institute for Innovation and Technology (iit) April 2014
  • 2. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Matching interests and expectations of cluster actors • Developing a services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 2
  • 3. • Cluster • Clusterinitiative • Clustermanagement Definitions 3
  • 4. Prevailing Clusters Chemical Industry
  • 5. Difference between Cluster and Cluster Initiatives
  • 6. Framework conditions (e.g. infrastructure, regulation, work force, level of education, image, macro economy) Cluster actors (business, research, public agencies) Cluster management organization Utilizing clusters as tool for economic or industrial development means developing industrial networks and value chains by means of cluster management! Three Dimension of a Cluster
  • 7. Co-location ...little relevance in terms of competitive performance; firms do not emphasise the local area, or firms within it as important vis-à-vis their own competitiveness Agglomeration ...co-location enhances firms’ competitive performance, but does so for reasons that are- in essence- ‘passive’. The place / area is regarded as important by firms, but for reasons other than active interaction with other local firms Clustering …co-location enhances firms’ performance because it facilitates collaborative working relationships with a range of local suppliers, customers, competitors, universities, research institutions, etc. Source: thanks to dr. Philip Cooke Networks and Collaborative Working Relationships competitiveness
  • 8. Clusters – What is Inside? Clustering – How it is Working? Leading Firms Key firms exporting Goods and Services Outside the Region Network of Supplier Firms Firms supplying inputs, raw materials, components, parts and specialized services Economic Foundations Human Technology Access Physical resources to Capital Infra- structure Collaboration Networking Competition REGION Products / Services Resources Working Together
  • 9. Cluster Key Actors - Ideal Structure  Thematic focus  Reginonal concentration  Vertical cluster 9 SMEs Large Enterprises Research Institutes Service Providers Universities Education & Training Cluster governance Manufacturer Supplier Partner (finance, marking, logistic) Developer Researcher
  • 10. Clusters are Key to Economic Growth Geographic concentrations of industries  Home of specialized local firms with specialized buyer-supplier relationships  Firms cooperate and compete  Firms share similar technologies, skills, financing mechanisms Environment that enables  Firms to develop technologies, skills to service often distant or even global markets  Local actors to develop unique know- how develops that distant rivals find hard to imitate • Concentration • Networks and linkages • Proximity
  • 11. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Developing a demand oriented services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 11
  • 12. SME in clusters are performing better….. ….. than the sector-specific average Cluster Monitor Germany, July 2012, 50 Cluster representing about 5000 company Much better Better Similar Slightly worse Much worse
  • 13. Higher intensity of iInvolvement leads to higher monetary added-values  Monetary added-value for SMEs in clusters All actors Actors that cooperate more intensive than others Cluster Monitor Germany, July 2012, 50 Cluster representing about 5000 company low similar high low similar high
  • 14. • 50% of the wind turbines around the world being developed and produced by Danish manufacturers along with many component suppliers based in the country. • Around 11,000 of the 25,000 employees in the Danish wind industry work less than one hour’s drive from Aarhus • Wind power accounts for more than 20 percent of the total power consumption in Denmark • Intended to be increased to up to 50 percent by 2020. North Jutland Denmark – Global Production and Knowledge Center of Wind Energy
  • 15. Singapore 620 km² Pop: 3.2 million GDP: US $85 billion 40% World Market Share in Hard Disks (1995) Singapore – Hot Spot in Hard Disks Production in 1995
  • 16. China – Wenzhou Footwear Cluster One of the seed beds of the Chinese private shoe manufacturing industry - globally competitive  Over 4,000 footwear firms,  Employ over 400,000 workers  Home of 70% of the top 30 domestic footwear firms  Production: – 1 billion pairs of shoes – 25% of the gross domestic footwear output – 12,5% of the global footwear production Clustering plays a significant role in helping rural industries overcome the growth constraints of capital and technology in the incipient stage of industrialization
  • 17. Clusters are Different in terms of Composition of Actors www.cluster-analysis.org
  • 18. Clusters are Different in terms of Size
  • 19. Clusters are Different in terms of Public Funding Rate
  • 20. Different Clusters – Different Objectives
  • 21. Clusters are Different in terms of Industrial Fields Covered BioTech vs. Chemistry Clusters
  • 22. Clusters are Different in terms of Legal Forms ICT vs. Chemistry Clusters
  • 23. Clusters are Different
  • 24. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Developing a demand oriented services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 25
  • 25. Massachusetts Medical Device Cluster
  • 26. Government Regulators Development Institutions (Governmental) Universities, Technical Schools and Institutes Financial Services Trade Unions Feed Production Suppliers Equipment, Inputs and Floating Equipment and Instruments Suppliers FRESH WATER Fish Eggs, pisciculture Prefarming: hatchery and smolts SEAWATER Sea cages; Farming PROCESSING PLANTS DISTRIBUTION Traders, Direct Channels, Brokers MARKETS Waste handling and by products (oil and fish meal) Transport of smolts (trucks, ships) Harvest Transport (Ships, trucks) Pharmacy, Biotech Inputs and Services Transports and Maintenance Suppliers Packaging Suppliers Transport and Logistics N: Estimated No of companies or institutions Aquaculture Cluster
  • 27. Commodity Excange Market Public Relations & Marketing Services Form Input Services Collaborative R&D Services Maintenance and Repair Services Palm Plantations (Upstream) Palm Industries (Downstream) Refinery – PPO • Refined bleached deodorized oil (RBD) Milling CPO • Crude Oil Palm • Palm Kernel Oil Foods • Cooking oil • Industrial margarine • Health-based foods Fractionation – PPO • Palm oil – cleorin, stearin • Kernel oil – oleorin, stearin Non-food products • Biodiesel • Oleo chemical • Nutraceutical Recycling of Waste • organic manure • bio gas Government Agencies • FELDA, NPOB Educational & Research Institutions Industry Groups • Palm Oil Association Plant & Equipment Manufacturing Shipping & Logistics Services Financial Services Packaging, Labeling Service Companies Distribution Network Undeveloped Competitive To improve Malaysian Palm Oil Cluster Map
  • 28. Group Working Government Agencies Educational & Research Institutions Industry Groups Competences of Industrial cluster actors (inside cluster) Industrial key actors outside cluster providing input Other key actors outside the cluster actors depend of
  • 29. Elements of Food Value Chain
  • 30. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Developing a demand oriented services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 31
  • 31. Cluster Key Actors SMEs Large Enterprises Research Institutes Service Providers Universities Education & Training Cluster managment
  • 32. SWEEP-NET – The Real Case • Young network • Expectation of member unknown • No tailor-made services offered • No synergies gained • Need to increase share of private financing
  • 33. First Three Key Actions Mapping of members Grouping of members Analysing expectations and demands
  • 34. 35  Local authorities  Regional goverments  Private sector (service providers, technology providers, private consultants)  International organisations / donors  Non-Governmental Institutions  Academia / educational institutes Main Customers / Clients of SWEEP-Net Mapping of members Grouping of members Analysing expectations and demands
  • 35. Group Working What are characteristic expectations of selected target groups?  Local authorities  Regional goverments  SME  Global firms  International organisations / donors  Non-Governmental Institutions  Academia / educational institutes
  • 36. 37  Contribution to the fulfillment of political goals  Demand oriented assistance  Access to knowledge, information and key actors  Capacity building  Support in becoming prepared and eligible for entering international projects  Project and financial management Expectations of Governmental Authorities
  • 37. 38  Access to knowledge, information and market trends  Capacity building  Generation of new business / matchmaking  Support in increasing innovation capabilities  Increased visibility  Support in internationalization  Improved visibility towards policy and administration  Access to local markets Expectations of Private Sector
  • 38. Fine Tuning of Cluster Actor‘s Expectations (I)
  • 39. Fine Tuning of Cluster Actor‘s Expectations (II)
  • 40. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Developing a demand oriented services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 41
  • 41. Added-values provided by the Cluster Management  Bundling regional competences of industry and academia  Increased visibility  Marketing, public relations  Networking with internal or external partners and political lobbying  Community building  Stimulation of innovations processes between different actors  Project fund acquisition and access to public support programmes  Information and experience exchange between the cluster actors / external  Human resources / Recruiting  Support regarding internationalisation  Engaging in collaborative R&D development and transfer
  • 42. 43  Contribution to the fulfillment of political goals SWEEP NET can be used by governmental authorities as an active tool to fulfill political objectives.  Demand oriented assistance Due to its knowledge, competence and international links, the SWEEP NET Secretary can actively support governmental authorities in solving day-to-day issues as well as to support them to fulfill long term political objectives.  Access to knowledge, information and key actors Local authorities are interested in having easy access to knowledge, information and key actors. SWEEP-NET Secretary can satisfy this demand by providing information and experience exchange, matchmaking etc  Capacity building In the MENA region there is still are strong need for capacity building and international experience exchange on all levels. Governmental authorities are interested in SWEEP NET Secretary to provide training schemes for capacity building Turning Expectations into Synergies Governmental Authorities (I)
  • 43. 44  Support in becoming prepared and eligible for entering international projects Entering international projects or becoming eligible for getting funded is of increasing importance for local authorities. SWEEP-Net Secretary can advice the candidate under which preconditions they are eligible to apply for funding or enter international projects.  Project and financial management Governmental authorities are often interested in joining international projects for various reasons. However, they do not like to be bothered with administrative or project management issues. This can be covered by the SWEEP-NET Secretary Turning Expectations into Synergies Governmental Authorities (II)
  • 44. 45  Access to knowledge, information and market trends The private sector has issues in getting access to knowledge and relevant market trends. SWEEP- NET can satisfy this demand by providing information and experience exchange, matchmaking etc.  Capacity building In the MENA region there is still are strong need for capacity building and international experience exchange on all levels. Private Sector is interested in SWEEP NET to provide training schemes.  Generation of new business / matchmaking By entering SWEEP-NET private actors expect getting better access to relevant partner or potential clients in order to generate new business.  Innovation SWM often asks for new solutions or the application of new technologies. Entering the SWEEP- NET community could facilitate the private actors to get in touch with the other partners to become more innovative or to match complementary competences.  Increased visibility Joining the SWEEP NET could increase regional, national and international visibility of private actors, especially those who are not known in the relevant markets. Turning Expectations into Synergies Private Sector (I)
  • 45. 46  Support in internationalization Often relevant markets in certain MENA-countries are limited and private sector actors are interested in getting access to foreign markets. SWEEP-NET is expected by private actors to offer support in this respect.  Improved visibility towards policy and administration Private actors often expect SWEET-NET to support them in getting access to decision makers from policy and administration. This also often contain lobbying and advocating in favour for the private sector.  Turning Expectations into Synergies Private Sector (II)
  • 46. • Clusters are Individuals • Cluster Mapping • Analysing the demand of cluster actors • Creating synergies • Developing a demand oriented services spectrum Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 47
  • 47. From Synergies to Demand Oriented Services for Public Sector (1) Working Groups (2) Coaching „Good SWM Policy“ (3) Networking, Matchmaking (4) AWARDs (5) Technical / Policy Papers (6) Access to Information (7) Advice Materplanning issues „Marakesh Declaration“ (8) Accessing International Projects (9) Access to Key Actors (10) Access to External Workshops (11) SWEEP-Net Workshops
  • 48. Priorisation of Services for Public SectorLowmoderatehigh Visibility Degree of difficulty / time needed for implementing Difficult / long moderate easy / short 11 10 9 8 7 65 4 3 2 1
  • 49. a. SWM-Benchmarking b. Labelling „Green Location“ c. Fitness Test „International Projects“ d. Support in Getting Access to International Projects e. Cost / Benefit calculations SWM f. Tech-Transfer g. Services to Increase Visibility of Companies h. Support in Internationalisation i. Training and education j. Services related to International Projects From Synergies to Demand Oriented Services for Private Sector
  • 50. Lowmoderatehigh Impactonrecognition/reputation Degree of difficulty / velocity to implement Difficult / slow moderate easy / fast j i h g a b d f e c Priorisation of Services for Private Sector
  • 51. Priorised Service Spectrum for Public Sector (1) Working Groups (2) Coaching „Good SWM Policy“ (3) Networking, Matchmaking (4) AWARDs (5) Technical / Policy Papers (6) Access to Information (7) Advice Materplanning issues „Marakesh Declaration“ (8) Accessing International Projects (9) Access to Key Actors (10) Access to External Workshops (11) SWEEP-Net Workshops
  • 52. a. SWM-Benchmarking b. Labelling „Green Location“ c. Fitness Test „International Projects“ d. Support in Getting Access to International Projects e. Cost / Benefit calculations SWM f. Tech-Transfer g. Services to Increase Visibility of Companies h. Support in Internationalisation i. Training and education j. Services related to International Projects Priorised Service Spectrum for Private Sector
  • 53. Standard Service Spectrums Provided by Cluster Managers 2. Training and Qualification • Analysis of branch related educational requirements • Activities for qualification of company staff • Regular special events - workshops and seminars - study trips for employees Typical fields of activities of a cluster management 1. Information and Communication • detailed database • frequent customer interviews • Internet/homepage • Newsletter • Supplier and service catalogue • Regular events, company tours 3. Internationalisation • Access to international events, congresses, topics, customers and trends • Support of international co-operation • Support of companies during internationalisation • Set-up of network activities between comparable/ complementary international clusters • Attract foreign visits in the cluster 4. Initiating Co-operations • Initiation and support of co-operation projects • Establishment of contacts between potential project partners • Co-operations with R&D, educational institutions and special service provider • Set-up of special support providers • Facilitate higher innovativeness 5. Marketing and PR • Information and marketing materials • Generation of regional identity • National and international PR • Organisation of trade fairs, company visits, presentations for major customers • Lobbying
  • 54. Cluster Management Services in Detail (I) Marketing / Branding  Representation of company  Support in public affairs activities / communication strategy  Representing company on trade fair  Regional branding  Organisation of events and fairs to promote cluster actors  Regional or cross-regional networking of cluster actorsl Lobbying  Policy lobbying  Lobbying for associations Networking among cluster actors  Information and experience exchange  Initiating working groups / tasks forces  Business creation among cluster actors Entrepreneurial support  Support of start-ups  Coaching of business plans  Fund raising / Venture Capital raising
  • 55. Cluster Management Services in Detail (II) Innovation and Cooperation  Brainstorming / creation of ideas  Identifcation and matching of right cluster actors  Support in proposal writing  Acquisition of third party funding  Project management  Creating of new business for initiating innovation among cluster actors Internationalisation  Support in the definition of an internationalisation strategy for cluster actors or for the entire cluster  Technology scouting / Trend scouting (Markets, technologies, competitors)  Initiiating international R&D consortia  Organisation of delegation missions  Participation in international trade fairs  Targeting / beauty contests for getting access to international key actors
  • 56. Cluster Management Services in Detail (III) Human development / training / education  Recruting  Development of platform of job vacancies  Development of vocational training schemes  Development of practical training schemes  Participation in recruiting events Additional Services  Foundation of buying associations
  • 57. • How to gather the right members in a cluster Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 58
  • 58. • Group Working What are suitable tools to identify “right” cluster actors Lessons to Be Learned in this Modul 59
  • 59. Tool for Acquiring Cluster Actors 60 Emerging Growth Maturity Tranformation Time Gradeofnetworking Data base Other tools Data From CoC Actors analysis Value Chain Analysis Networ- king analysis Visual Raod- mapping
  • 60. Tool 1: Actor Analysis  Demand profile – Actor mapping – Actors analysis  What are key objectives  What competences, products, proccesses are already available  Who is missing, what competences are missing  Who can significantly contribute to cluster objectives  Are strategic partners missing  Is there a good balance between SME, global player and R&D institutions 61
  • 61. Tool 2: Networking Analysis Networking analysis  Who already cooperates with whom  Which key actors / lead partnern have to be involved einbeziehen  Who cooperated with partners in the region, but not involved in cluster activities 62
  • 62. 63 Tool 2: Networking Analysis
  • 63. Instrument 3: Wertschöpfungsketten-Analyse (1) Methode (Staccato Taxonomie)  zwei Varianten: akteursgruppenbezogen bzw. einzelnen Akteure analysieren und den Stufen der Wertschöpfungs-kette / zuordnen  branchenbezogene Wertschöpfungskette vollständig versus Anknüpfungspunkte für Cross-Clustering identifizieren  fehlende Akteure / Kompetenzen werden sichtbar  welche Wertschöpfungsstufen sind minimalistisch / gar nicht abgedeckt  was sind die Gründe dafür / wer könnte geeignet sein  qualitativer Analyseansatz  Fokus: alle Wertschöpfungsstufen sollten abgedeckt werden 64
  • 64. Tool 3: Value Chain Analysis 65
  • 65. 66 Tool 3: Value Chain Analysis Regional coverage of Biogas value chain
  • 66. 67 Tool 3: Value Chain Analysis
  • 67. Tool 4: Visual-Roadmapping-Methode 68
  • 68. 69 Tool 4: Visual-Roadmapping-Methode
  • 69. 70 Fee-based services  SWM Benchmarking (comparison of status of development of local SWM system)  Labelling „green location“  Fitness test to confirm eligibility for access to finance / international projects  Cost-benefits-calculations  Tailor-made trainings / workshop Local authorities Service spectrum Services included in membership fee  Access to information (trends, market reports, technical papers, standards, etc.)  Networking, matchmaking, working groups  Access to technical / political papers (incl. comments how to deal with them)  Access to external trainings / workshops  Best practice missions  Access to key actors on national or international level  Support in accessing international projects  Best SWM-solution Award / SWM Manager of the Year
  • 70. 71 Fee-based services  Adcanced training / workshops  Increasing company visibility (website, sponsorship, company presentation measures, meeting high level policy makers, ….)  Measures to generate new business (specific matchmaking, user-supplier-clubs, beauty contests, etc…..)  Market access measures (delegation mission abroad and in MENA region, specific market information, etc.) – intended both for MENA-companies and non-MENA-companies  Technology transfer (working groups to specific technical issues)  Additional measures (to be decided) Private sector Service spectrum Services included in membership fee  Access to information (trends, market reports, technical papers, standards, etc.)  Networking, matchmaking (standard), working groups  Access to technical / political papers (incl. comments how to deal with them)  Access to external trainings / workshops  Access to key actors on national or international level
  • 71. Registered Association is Prevailing Logal Form for Cluster Initiatives

×