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Introduction to Color Mixing
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Introduction to Color Mixing

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Introduction to color mixing and color theory with examples

Introduction to color mixing and color theory with examples

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  • Alright, are you all ready for some color review? Who can tell me what the three primary colors are? That’s right, red, blue, and yellow. The primary colors are the colors from which all of the other colors are created.
  • As I mentioned just now, the primary colors are mixed in specific pairs to create the secondary colors. If you mix red and blue together, what do you get?
  • When you mix blue and yellow together, what do you get?
  • And finally, when you mix red and yellow together, you get what color?
  • Can anybody tell me what the three secondary colors are? Yes, green, orange, and violet are all created from combinations of red, blue, and yellow.
  • A helpful tool for visualizing the six basic colors and their relationships is based on a triangular pattern. The primary colors are arranged in a triangle, and in between them (click to secondary colors), are the secondary colors, and as you can see, they’re arranged between the two primary colors which are used to create them. Orange lies between red and yellow, green lies between yellow and blue, and so on…
  • Tertiary colors are a result of mixing a primary color and a secondary color. You can see the tertiary colors lie in between a primary and a secondary color on the color wheel, and their names are really easy to remember; its just a combination of the primary and secondary color So for instance, if you mix red and violet together, you’ll get a color called red-violet. If you mix yellow and orange together, you’ll get yellow-orange What do you get when you mix blue and green? That’s correct, blue-green
  • You all are probably familiar with the terms warm and cool colors. You can divide the color wheel in half to visualize the differences between these color families. Warm colors, like their name, are warmer looking. They remind us of the sun.
  • Cool colors look cooler to the eye, they don’t vibrate the way that warm colors do when you look at them. You can think of water, or ice, when you think of cool colors.
  • Complementary colors are easy to remember because they are directly across from each other on the color wheel. Red and green are complements, blue and orange are complements, and violet and yellow are complements. Advertisers will often use complementary colors together because when placed next to each other the colors really vibrate, or stand out against one another.
  • Alright, I’d like to show you all a cool optical illusion. If you’re ever struggling with your complementary colors, your eyes can tell you which go together. How does that work? In a moment, I’m going to skip to the next slide, and I want you all to stare at the color that you see for about 15 seconds. Then, I’ll change the slide again and you all can tell me what color you see next. Are you ready?
  • What color were you able to see this time? Violet and yellow are complementary colors.
  • Analogous colors are colors that are next to each other on the color wheel. They often share a base color, like yellow or red. Analogous colors look good next to each other because they share similarities in appearance. Artists often use analogous color combinations to create works that are attractive to the eye.
  • Can anyone tell me who this artist is? Yes, Vincent Van Gogh. He used an analogous color scheme to paint this picture of sunflowers He used orange, yellow, yellow-orange, and yellow-green, as well as tints and shades of those colors, to create a visually appealing painting.
  • Another color relationship is called the split triad. Starting with one of the six base colors, draw a line across the color wheel to that colors’ complement. Now, look to either side of that color. The two tertiary colors that lie on either side of the colors’ complement are part of that colors’ split triad. You can see where split triad gets its name, because the colors create a triangular pattern and split in the middle. Can someone give me another example of a split triad relationship?
  • This painting is entitled, “Music- Pink and Blue II” by Georgia O’Keeffe. It also has a split triad color scheme.
  • Start by choosing a base color, like orange. To create monochromatic colors, you can add varying amounts of orange to white to create all of the tints you see in between The three peachy shades in the middle are tints, because they’re a combination of white and a basic color from the color wheel. (Begin color mixing demo)
  • Here is a painting done by a high school student in a monochromatic color scheme and black.

Transcript

  • 1. COLOR WHEEL REVIEW
    • Ms. Meier
  • 2. PRIMARY COLORS RED BLUE YELLOW
  • 3. COLOR MIXING
    • PRIMARY COLORS are mixed in specific pairs to create SECONDARY COLORS
    VIOLET RED BLUE + =
  • 4. COLOR MIXING
    • PRIMARY COLORS are mixed in specific pairs to create SECONDARY COLORS
    GREEN BLUE YELLOW + =
  • 5. COLOR MIXING
    • PRIMARY COLORS are mixed in specific pairs to create SECONDARY COLORS
    ORANGE RED YELLOW + =
  • 6. SECONDARY COLORS GREEN ORANGE VIOLET
  • 7. BASIC COLOR WHEEL
  • 8. TERTIARY COLORS Red-orange Yellow-green Red-violet Blue-green Blue-violet Yellow-orange
  • 9. WARM COLORS
  • 10. COOL COLORS
  • 11. COMPLEMENTARY COLORS
  • 12. COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME
  • 13.
    • COMPLEMENTARY COLOR
    • OPTICAL ILLUSION
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16. ANALOGOUS COLORS
  • 17. ANALOGOUS COLOR SCHEME
  • 18. SPLIT TRIAD
  • 19. SPLIT TRIAD SCHEME
  • 20. TINTS AND SHADES BLUE-GREEN WHITE
  • 21. TINTS AND SHADES
    • Shades are colors that are created using any color from the color wheel and black . Shades are generally much darker than tints.
    RED BLACK
  • 22. MONOCHROMATIC COLORS
    • Monochromatic colors are created by mixing a color from the color wheel with varying amounts of white.
    ORANGE WHITE
  • 23. MONOCHROMATIC COLOR SCHEME RED-VIOLET WHITE