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2012 2013 ap summer assignment with multiple choice
 

2012 2013 ap summer assignment with multiple choice

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    2012 2013 ap summer assignment with multiple choice 2012 2013 ap summer assignment with multiple choice Document Transcript

    • AP Chemistry Summer Assignment2012 – 2013 School YearMs. Megonigal J204megonigale@calvertnet.k12.md.usPrimary Textbook: Chemistry, 6th Edition, Author: S. ZumdahlSecondary Textbook (to purchase): Cracking the AP Chemistry Exam (The Princeton Review)Part 1: (20 problems total)Read Chapter 1 in the textbook and take notes as you read.* Be sure to look at the pictures,graphs, tables and figures as you read. Complete the following problems at the end of thechapter: 16, 19, 20, 21, 23, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 32, 33, 48, 50, 57, 58, 59, 66, 67 and 70.You must show all work for math related problems.Part 2 (22 problems total)Read Chapter 2 in the textbook and take notes as you read. Be sure to look at the pictures,graphs, tables and figures as you read. Complete the following problems at the end of thechapter: 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 21, 24, 37, 38, 44, 46, 50, 51, 57, 58, 60, 61, 64, 66, 68, 70 and 72.You must show all work for math related problems.Part 3Memorize the following common monatomic ions and polyatomic ions:Table 2.3 on pg. 62Table 2.4 on pg. 63Table 2.5 on pg. 67This will make the course easier for you as we learn new concepts throughout the year. Isuggest making flashcards as a study aid. You will be tested on these the first week back.Part 4 (30 problems total)Read Chapter 3 in the textbook and take notes as you read. Be sure to look at the pictures,graphs, tables and figures as you read. Complete the following problems at the end of thechapter: 9, 12, 15, 18, 22, 23, 25, 28, 29 and 30 (10 problems)In addition, complete the attached multiple choice problems (20 problems).You must show all work for problems!!*It is extremely important to read the textbook as opposed to simply skimming it. Whenexample problems are given, take the time to analyze them; do not just skip over them!Be prepared to turn in all work (chapter notes and problems) in a spiral notebook on thefirst day of school. Make sure your work is neat, legible and clearly labeled in the same orderas listed above.Be prepared for a test on the material in Chapters 1 – 3 at the end of the first week of schooland several graded assignments the first week as well.All questions in blue have the answers in the back of the textbook. Do NOT be tempted tosimply copy the answers, as it will do you no good. I specifically chose these questions so youcan check yourself periodically to make sure you are doing the problem/questions correctly.
    • Name_____________________________________________________________________________________AP Chemistry Summer Assignment 2011 – 2012 School YearPart 4 Assignment continuedMultiple Choice QuestionsYou MUST show all work for any problems involving math! 1. Which one of the following elements has been selected as the current atomic weight standard? a. O b. C c. H d. Na 2. Bromine is composed of two isotopes. One of the isotopes, Br-X, makes up 49.7% of the total while the other, Br-78.9 makes up 50.3% of the total. Calculate the atomic mass of Br-X a. 80.0 b. 80.9 c. 89.7 d. 78.9 3. Four beakers containing potassium nitrate dissolved in water are allowed to evaporate to dryness. Beakers 1 through 4 contain 2.3, 1.91, 5.985, and 0.52 g of dry potassium nitrate. How many moles of potassium nitrate were recovered after the water evaporated? a. 0.106 moles b. 0.212 moles c. 0.500 moles d. 2.35 moles 4. How many atoms of uranium (U) are present in 1 nanogram of uranium? a. 2.5 x 1020 b. 5.0 x 1010 c. 2.5 x 1012 d. 5.0 x 1031 5. Calculate the percent composition of hydrogen in sucrose (C12H22O11). a. 6% b. 10% c. 33% d. 20% 6. Two of the three forms of vitamin B6 are pyridoxine (C8H11NO2) and pyridoxamine (C8H12N2O2). Calculate the respective percentage of nitrogen in each compound. a. 8.8%, 17% b. 9.3%, 18% c. 9.2%, 17% d. 18%, 9.2% 7. Determine the molecular formula of a compound that contains 26.7% P, 12.1% N, 61.2% Cl, and a molecular weight of 580 g/mol. a. (PNCl)3 b. (PNCl2)5 c. (P2NCl2)5 d. (PNCl2)
    • 8. Calculate the empirical formula for a compound that contains 32.2% Ca and 67.8% N by mass. a. Ca(N3)2 b. CaN2 c. CaN d. CaN49. Find the empirical formula of the compound that contains 15.8% Al, 28.1% S and 56.1% O. a. Al2(SO4)3 b. AlSO2 c. AlSO d. Al2SO310. 505 grams of KOH are required to completely react with 4.50 moles of sulfuric acid. How many moles of K2SO4 are produced? (make sure to correctly predict products)11. What are the coefficients necessary to balance the following equations? b. __C3H8 + ___F2  ___C3F8 + ___HF12. For every liter of sea water that evaporates, 3.7 g of magnesium hydroxide are produced. How many liters of sea water must evaporate to produce 5.00 moles of magnesium hydroxide?13. A solution of copper sulfate is treated with zinc metal. How many grams of copper are produced if 2.9 g of zinc are consumed? CuSO4 + Zn  ZnSO4 + Cu a. 2.9 g b. 2.8 g c. 5.7 g d. 3.7 g14. How many grams of carbon dioxide are produced from the burning of 1368 g of sucrose according to the following equation? C12H22O11 + 12O2  12CO2 + 11H2O a. 342 g b. 176 g c. 1056 g d. 2112 g15. How many grams of sulfur dioxide are produced when 90.0 g of thionyl chloride reacts with excess water according to the following equation? SOCl2 + H2O  2HCl + SO2 a. 96.8 g b. 90.0 g c. 24.2 g d. 48.4 g
    • 16. Calcium oxide is a basic oxide that is not very soluble in water. Calcium oxide can react with carbon dioxide to form calcium carbonate (according to the equation below). Calcium carbonate is an insoluble salt that forms stalactites and stalagmites. How many moles of carbon dioxide are removed from water if a 400.0 lb stalagmite is formed? CaO + CO2  CaCO3 a. 1816 b. 908 c. 4000 d. 225817. Calculate the number of grams of TiOCl2 required to react with 134 g of carbon. ___TiOCl2 + ___C  ___Ti + ___CO2 + ___CCl418. Calculate the number of grams of methane (CH4) required to react with 25.0 g of chlorine according to the following equation: ___CH4 + ___Cl2  ___CH3Cl + ___CH2Cl2 + ___HCl19. Identify the limiting reactant and calculate the number of grams left over in excess for the following equation: ___Cr2O3 + ___CCl4  ___CrCl3 + ___COCl2 The reaction began with 5.00 g of Cr2O3 and 12.0 g of CCl4. a. Limiting: CCl4, 1.05 g Cr2O3 left over b. Limiting: Cr2O3, 10.0 g CCl4 left over c. Limiting: CCl4, 3.70 g Cr2O3 left over d. Limiting: Cr2O3, 6.75 g CCl4 left over20. Identify the limiting reactant and the number of grams left over in excess if 1.9 grams of phosgene and 1.9 grams of sodium hydroxide are combined in the following reaction: COCl2 + 2NaOH  2NaCl + H2O + CO2 a. Limiting: COCl2, 0.588 g NaOH left over b. Limiting: COCl2, 0.4 g NaOH left over c. Limiting: NaOH, 0.520 g COCl2 left over d. Limiting: NaOH, 0.355 g COCl2 left over