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Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy
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Net Gen Life, Learning and Literacy

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Some stats and comments on Net Gen information behaviour, learning and literacy

Some stats and comments on Net Gen information behaviour, learning and literacy

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  • 1. NET GEN LIFE, LEARNING and LITERACY Megan Poore
  • 2. <ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Statistics and expectations </li></ul><ul><li>ICT proficiency and literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Information behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>Learning needs </li></ul><ul><li>Moral Panic and Digital Faith </li></ul><ul><li>Implications </li></ul>COVERAGE
  • 3. <ul><li>Web 2.0 is not a software package </li></ul><ul><li>It is the ‘read-write’ web </li></ul>WEB 2.0
  • 4. WEB 2.0 O’Reilly, Tim. 2005. What Is Web 2.0. Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html . Accessed 10 October 2007. WEB 1.0 WEB 2.0 Ofoto Flickr Mp3.com Napster Britannica Online Wikipedia Personal websites Blogging Publishing Participation Content mgt systs. Wikis Directories (taxonomy) Tagging (‘folksonomy’) Stickiness Syndication Software as package Software as service
  • 5. <ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>MySpace, Face book </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasting </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging, RSS </li></ul>WEB 2.0
  • 6. Lankshear, Colin and Michele Knobel. 2006. Blogging as participation: the active sociality of a new literacy. http://www.geocities.com/c.lankshear/bloggingparticipation.pdf. Accessed 10 October 2007 Mindset 1.0 Mindset 2.0 The world is appropriately interpreted, understood and responded to in broadly physical industrial terms. The world cannot adequately be interpreted, understood and responded to in physical-industrial terms only. Value is a function of scarcity Value is a function of dispersion Products as material artifacts Products as enabling services. Tools for producing Tools for mediating and relating Focus on individual intelligence Focus on collective intelligence Expertise and authority ‘located’ in individuals and institutions Expertise and authority are distributed and collective; hybrid experts Space as enclosed and purpose specific Space as open, continuous and fluid Social relations of ‘bookspace’; a stable ‘textual order’ Social relations of emerging ‘digital media space’; texts in change
  • 7. <ul><li>Users add value </li></ul><ul><li>Some rights reserved </li></ul><ul><li>Perpetual beta </li></ul><ul><li>Co-operate , don’t control </li></ul><ul><li>Constructivism </li></ul>WEB 2.0 DESIGN PATTERNS O’Reilly, Tim. 2005. What Is Web 2.0. Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html . Accessed 10 October 2007.
  • 8. <ul><li>Also called ‘ millennials ’, ‘Digital Natives’ </li></ul><ul><li>In the UK, 1 in 3 children aged between 5 and 9 owns a mobile phone </li></ul><ul><li>Average age of first phone ownership is 8 </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION Vision. 2005. The future of mobile technology: learning ‘on the run’? Vision 1: 11-3. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/documents/vision/VISION_01.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007.
  • 9. <ul><li>Parallel process and multi-task </li></ul><ul><li>Have ‘hypertext minds’ </li></ul><ul><li>Have always had Web 2.0 at home </li></ul><ul><li>Have little patience for step-by-step logic (or reasoning?) </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION Prensky, Marc. 2001. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon , 9 (5): 1-6.
  • 10. <ul><li>Some evidence that their brain structures are different … </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION Prensky, Marc. 2001. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon , 9 (5): 1-6.
  • 11. <ul><li>Some false assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Net Gen’ are those born post-1980 (no! that’s too old to describe people who were ‘brought up’ with Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>All young people are ‘Net Gen’ </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION
  • 12. Instead, let’s think of a ‘generation’ as describing a set of behaviours, rather than an age-specific demographic THE NET GENERATION
  • 13. <ul><li>Characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Values </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION
  • 14. <ul><li>Information-rich </li></ul><ul><li>Non-linear and associative </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-media ,visual and graphical </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate /instantaneous </li></ul><ul><li>Immersive and abundant </li></ul><ul><li>Relevant and meaningful </li></ul>INFORMATION FOR THE NET GEN Pletka, Bob. 2007. Educating the Net Generation. How to engage students in the 21 st century . Santa Monica Press.
  • 15. <ul><li>Community-oriented and team-based </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative , co-operative, participatory </li></ul><ul><li>Communication-rich </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive and dialogical </li></ul><ul><li>Customised , personalised, individualised </li></ul>COMMUNITY, COLLABN, CHOICE Pletka, Bob. 2007. Educating the Net Generation. How to engage students in the 21 st century . Santa Monica Press.
  • 16. <ul><li>Are active processors of information </li></ul><ul><li>Filter info all the time </li></ul><ul><li>Are used to getting info immediatel y </li></ul><ul><li>Are used to controlling info flows </li></ul>CHARACTERISTICS Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum.
  • 17. <ul><li>Get bored if the information flow is poor or too slow </li></ul><ul><li>Use non-linear resources </li></ul><ul><li>Do not complain of information overload! </li></ul>CHARACTERISTICS Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum.
  • 18. <ul><li>Absorb discontinuous information and make meaning of it </li></ul><ul><li>Cope with complexity </li></ul><ul><li>Increase or decrease their attention levels , depending on need </li></ul>COMPLEXITY Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum.
  • 19. <ul><li>Can work with sub-optimal knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Make sense of bits </li></ul><ul><li>Accept uncertainty </li></ul>COMPLEXITY Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum.
  • 20. <ul><li>Are effective communicators </li></ul><ul><li>Prefer communicating through images </li></ul><ul><li>Use their networks </li></ul><ul><li>Are used to controlling communication </li></ul><ul><li>Are collaborative </li></ul>COMMUNICATION Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum.
  • 21. <ul><li>‘ Net Gen’ communication is </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multimodal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interactive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative and interpretive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comes easily to them </li></ul></ul>COMMUNICATION Johnson, Larry. 2006. The sea change before us. EDUCAUSE Review , March/April 2006: 72-3. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0628.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007
  • 22. <ul><li>Are personalised </li></ul><ul><li>Are visual </li></ul><ul><li>Have links to the community </li></ul><ul><li>Are rigorous </li></ul><ul><li>Use individualised feedback </li></ul>LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Pletka, Bob. 2007. Educating the Net Generation. How to engage students in the 21 st century . Santa Monica Press.
  • 23. <ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Openness </li></ul><ul><li>Access </li></ul>VALUES Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum. p. 47
  • 24. <ul><li>Speak with an ‘ accent ’ – or a different language entirely! </li></ul><ul><li>Misunderstand the new ways in which the Net Gen learns </li></ul>‘ DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS’ Prensky, Marc. 2001. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon , 9 (5): 1-6.
  • 25. <ul><li>Work in a linear fashion </li></ul><ul><li>Read the instructions first before using </li></ul><ul><li>Are used to working alone </li></ul><ul><li>Believe in doing things 'right ' </li></ul><ul><li>Believe in doing things one thing at a time </li></ul>‘ DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS’ Veen, Wim and Ben Vrakking. 2007. Homo Zappiens: Growing up in a digital age . Continuum. p. 32
  • 26. “ What truly continues to separate the generations is not technological skill but how the generations perceive the digital world” THE DIGITAL WORLD Pletka, Bob. 2007. Educating the Net Generation. How to engage students in the 21 st century . Santa Monica Press. p. 42
  • 27. <ul><li>Students are feeling as though they are ‘ powering down ’ when they enter the school gates </li></ul>NET GENERATION AT SCHOOL Vision. 2005. The future of mobile technology: learning ‘on the run’? Vision 1: 11-3. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/documents/vision/VISION_01.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007.
  • 28. TECHNOLOGY TO WATCH EDUCAUSE. 2008. The Horizon Report . New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. www.nmc.org/pdf/2008-Horizon-Report.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008 . Smart objects Collective intelligence Educational gaming Semantic-aware applications Social operating systems New scholarship and forms of publication Personal web Data mashups Virtual worlds Geo-everything Mobile broadband Mobile phones Cloud computing Collaboration webs Social networking Mobiles Grassroots video User-created content 2009 2008 2007
  • 29. SOME STATS: Access <ul><li>Broadband, 2006-7 </li></ul><ul><li>1/2 - 2/3 of all internet connections are broadband </li></ul>Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2008. Internet access at home. Available at http ://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Chapter10002008 . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009.
  • 30. SOME STATS: Access <ul><li>Broadband, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>79% </li></ul><ul><li>Broadband is linked with increased internet use </li></ul>Ewing, Scott, Julain Thomas and Julianne Schiessl. 2008. The Internet in Australia. Available at http://cci.edu.au/publications/digital-futures . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009. p. 1.
  • 31. SOME STATS: Online <ul><li>Use by age </li></ul><ul><li>18 - 24: 95.1% </li></ul><ul><li>24 - 24: 90.6% </li></ul><ul><li>35 - 49: 83.7% </li></ul><ul><li>50 - 64: 66.1% </li></ul><ul><li>64+:29.8% </li></ul>Ewing, Scott, Julain Thomas and Julianne Schiessl. 2008. The Internet in Australia. Available at http://cci.edu.au/publications/digital-futures . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009. p. 2.
  • 32. SOME STATS: Online activities
  • 33. <ul><li>Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Experiences </li></ul><ul><li>ICT proficiency and literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Information behaviour </li></ul>THE NET GENERATION
  • 34. STUDENT EXPECTATIONS <ul><li>International students use more tech </li></ul><ul><li>Engineering students more likely to use tech than Arts students </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons for use: convenience and control – not learning </li></ul>University of Melbourne. 2006. First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really Digital Natives? http://www.bmu.unimelb.edu.au/research/munatives/natives_report2006.pdf . Accessed 12 February 2008.
  • 35. <ul><li>Preference for using technology </li></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous internet is normal </li></ul><ul><li>Cautious about publishing their work for public scrutiny </li></ul><ul><li>Tech is not an end in itself </li></ul><ul><li>Face-to-face is seen as core </li></ul>STUDENT EXPECTATIONS JISC. 2007. Student expectations study: Findings from preliminary research. (Joint Information Systems Committee) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/studentexpectationsbp.aspx . Accessed 12 February 2008.
  • 36. <ul><li>Uncertain about how to map current learning experience onto uni study </li></ul><ul><li>Cannot see how ICT and learning can work together outside of school </li></ul>STUDENT EXPECTATIONS JISC. 2007. Student expectations study: Findings from preliminary research. (Joint Information Systems Committee) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/studentexpectationsbp.aspx . Accessed 12 February 2008.
  • 37. COMFORT LEVELS FAMILIARITY
  • 38. COMFORT LEVELS
  • 39. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>ICT is seen either as a platform for admin or content delivery </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 24, p. 28.
  • 40. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>Students struggle to understand how some technologies can be used in the educational environment </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived level of usefulness of ICT increases with frequency of use </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 7.
  • 41. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>67% of students assume they can use their own equipment at university </li></ul><ul><li>80% are satisfied with the level of internet access provided </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . pp. 7-8.
  • 42. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>25% rate guidance on using ICT in their studies as neutral, or poor. </li></ul><ul><li>This is higher amongst arts students. </li></ul><ul><li>57% look for new technologies to support their learning </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 8.
  • 43. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>Most students will ask their friends first when solving a problem (mostly for convenience). </li></ul><ul><li>Students are neutral about use of ICT in teaching: the key is to use it well. </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 10, p. 24.
  • 44. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>There is still an assumption that teaching is about conveying knowledge; this leads to assumptions about the type of tech that is appropriate for the teacher to use. </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 10.
  • 45. STUDENT EXPERIENCES <ul><li>Social networking that emerges organically works better than that put in place by the teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>ICT that is driven by students themselves (and not ‘fake’) is successful. </li></ul>Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 10, 31-2.
  • 46. SOME STATS: Incoming students Access University of Melbourne. 2006. First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really Digital Natives? http://www.bmu.unimelb.edu.au/research/munatives/natives_report2006.pdf . Accessed 12 February 2008. Mobile 93% Desktop 90% Broadband 73%
  • 47. SOME STATS: Incoming students Computer use University of Melbourne. 2006. First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really Digital Natives? http://www.bmu.unimelb.edu.au/research/munatives/natives_report2006.pdf . Accessed 12 February 2008. Emailing 94% Creating documents 88% Info searching 83%
  • 48. Main activities on computers ‘ Overwhelmingly positive’ SOME STATS: Incoming students University of Melbourne. 2006. First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really Digital Natives? http://www.bmu.unimelb.edu.au/research/munatives/natives_report2006.pdf . Accessed 12 February 2008. Study 94% Info Searching 93% Course admin 84% SMS 84% IM 75%
  • 49. <ul><li>Working with info </li></ul><ul><li>Creating and sharing info </li></ul><ul><li>Using ICT responsibly </li></ul>ICT PROFICIENCY MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 50. <ul><li>Accessing info (identification, retrieval) </li></ul><ul><li>Managing info (organising, storing) </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating info (integrity, relevance, usefulness) </li></ul>ICT LITERACY: KEY PROCESSES MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 51. <ul><li>New understandings (creating knowledge, authoring) </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating with others (sharing; creating products) </li></ul><ul><li>Using ICT appropriately (critical, reflective, strategy, ethics and legals) </li></ul>ICT LITERACY: KEY PROCESSES MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 52. <ul><li>‘ Challenging but reasonable ’ expectation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Year 6: 49% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Year 10: 61% </li></ul></ul>ICT PROFICIENCY MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 53. <ul><li>Patterns: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low socio-economic bkgnd </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indigeneity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remote locality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gender not an issue </li></ul></ul>ICT PROFICIENCY MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 54. <ul><li>Findings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication is a frequent use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BUT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less use of applications for creating , analysing , transforming information </li></ul></ul>ICT PROFICIENCY MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 55. <ul><li>Younger users </li></ul><ul><li>Older people and ICTs </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR
  • 56. <ul><li>Increase in full-phrase searching </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfied with basic forms of searching </li></ul><ul><li>Good parallel processing skills, but sequential for reading? </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 57. <ul><li>No evidence that information literacy is worse than before </li></ul><ul><li>Not expert searchers – Youngsters have always had trouble evaluating info </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviour is now more public </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 58. <ul><li>Skills gap between using media to create and how to create meaningful content </li></ul>CRITICAL CHALLENGE EDUCAUSE. 2007. The Horizon Report . New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/CSD4781.pdf. Accessed 10 October 2007 . pp 4-5
  • 59. <ul><li>Spend little time evaluating for accuracy, relevance, authority (but this is also pre-web) </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 60. <ul><li>Young people are concerned about the ‘ unmanageable scale ’ of the Web. </li></ul><ul><li>They find it difficult to prioritse and evaluate search results. </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 61. <ul><li>Fit between search engines and student lifestyles is ‘ almost perfect ’ </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 62. <ul><li>Older users are catching up fast </li></ul><ul><li>All have increasing intolerance for information delay </li></ul><ul><li>More people are ‘ powerbrowsing ’ </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR: ALL CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 63. <ul><li>Individual and personality backgrounds more important than generation </li></ul><ul><li>Looking for ‘ the answer ’ rather than particular format </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of pre-publishing (blogs, wikis, websites) </li></ul>INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR: ALL CIBER. 2008. Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. Available from www.bl.uk/news/pdf/googlegen.pdf . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 64. <ul><li>Age is important regarding engagement re ICTs BUT </li></ul><ul><li>Attitude and character key to connection (not age, health, income) </li></ul>OLDER PEOPLE AND ICTs OFCOM. 2006. Older people and communications technology. An attitudinal study into older people and their engagement with communications technology. Available at http://www.ofcomconsumerpanel.org.uk/information/research-policy.htm . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 65. <ul><li>Tailoring the learning environment is essential to engaging older people </li></ul>OLDER PEOPLE AND ICTs OFCOM. 2006. Older people and communications technology. An attitudinal study into older people and their engagement with communications technology. Available at http://www.ofcomconsumerpanel.org.uk/information/research-policy.htm . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 66. <ul><li>Current users: absorbers; self-starters </li></ul><ul><li>Non-users: rejecters; disengaged </li></ul><ul><li>Those not connected will become increasingly excluded </li></ul>OLDER PEOPLE AND ICTs OFCOM. 2006. Older people and communications technology. An attitudinal study into older people and their engagement with communications technology. Available at http://www.ofcomconsumerpanel.org.uk/information/research-policy.htm . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 67. <ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Gaming </li></ul>INFORMAL LEARNING
  • 68. <ul><li>Facebook, My Space </li></ul><ul><li>60% of students talk about education topics online </li></ul><ul><li>50 % talk about schoolwork </li></ul>SOCIAL NETWORKING NSBA. 2007. Creating and Connecting. Research and Guidelines on Online Social — and Educational — Networking. Available at www.nsba.org/SecondaryMenu/TLN/CreatingandConnecting.aspx . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 69. <ul><li>Strengthens existing relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates recognisable social interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Is a forum for creativity and expression </li></ul>SOCIAL NETWORKING Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 70. <ul><li>Younger users are more likely to restrict access or withhold identifying information </li></ul>SOCIAL NETWORKING Madden, Mary, Susannah Fox, Aaron Smith, and Jessica Vitak. 2007. Online identity management and search in the age of transparency. Available at http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/229/report_display.asp . Accessed 21 October 2008.
  • 71. <ul><li>Are hard </li></ul><ul><li>Are about experience , delayed gratification, exploration , teamwork , reward </li></ul><ul><li>Force you to decide , choose , prioritise (weigh evidence, analyse situations, consult long-term goals, decide) </li></ul>GAMES ... Johnson, Larry. 2006. The sea change before us. EDUCAUSE Review , March/April 2006: 72-3. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0628.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007
  • 72. <ul><li>Probing as scientific method: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Probe the environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Form hypothesis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reprobe and check the effect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rethink based on feedback </li></ul></ul>GAMING: PROBING Johnson, Larry. 2006. The sea change before us. EDUCAUSE Review , March/April 2006: 72-3. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0628.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007
  • 73. <ul><li>Means co-ordinating with your ultimate objectives </li></ul><ul><li>It’s about order and constructing proper hierarchies </li></ul><ul><li>Means long-term planning and present focus </li></ul>GAMING: TELESCOPING Johnson, Larry. 2006. The sea change before us. EDUCAUSE Review , March/April 2006: 72-3. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0628.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007. pp. 54-5
  • 74. <ul><li>It’s not what you’re thinking, but the way you’re thinking that’s important. </li></ul>GAMING Johnson, Larry. 2006. The sea change before us. EDUCAUSE Review , March/April 2006: 72-3. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0628.pdf . Accessed 10 October 2007. P. 15
  • 75. <ul><li>The new digital divide </li></ul><ul><li>Myths: moral panic and digital faith </li></ul><ul><li>Implications and points for consideration </li></ul>GETTING PERSPECTIVE
  • 76. <ul><li>Is about access to knowledge, not PCs </li></ul><ul><li>It needs to be about relationships and networks : not hardware </li></ul>THE NEW DIGITAL DIVIDE Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. pp. 59-60.
  • 77. <ul><li>The internet is dangerous for children. ( Children self-regulate all the time.) </li></ul><ul><li>Junk culture is poisoning young people. (Youth culture always challenges the orthodoxy .) </li></ul>MYTHS: MORAL PANIC Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. pp. 32, 34.
  • 78. <ul><li>No learning happens online. (Broad range of skills and learning that gives confidence to succeed in other contexts . Children better identify beneficial computer games than can adults.) </li></ul>MYTHS: MORAL PANIC Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. pp. 35-6.
  • 79. <ul><li>There is a plagiarism epidemic in schools. (This shouldn’t be conflated with new ways of accessing information . We need to teach higher-order skills.) </li></ul>MYTHS: MORAL PANIC Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. p. 38.
  • 80. <ul><li>Young people are disengaged and disconnected. (Students use ICTs to engage with cultural and political issues , get mentoring.) </li></ul>MYTHS: MORAL PANIC Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. p. 39.
  • 81. <ul><li>This generation is one of passive consumers. (No. Media, gaming, networking communities mean large elements of production, creativity, communication .) </li></ul>MYTHS: MORAL PANIC Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. p. 38.
  • 82. <ul><li>All gaming is good. (There are different orders of digital activity , and not all activities are equal.) </li></ul>MYTHS: DIGITAL FAITH Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. p. 42.
  • 83. <ul><li>All children are cyberkids. (Cannot assume that behaviours from a motivated group with high access is characteristic. There is a gap between ‘everyday communicators’ and ‘digital pioneers’ .) </li></ul>MYTHS: DIGITAL FAITH Green, Hannah, and Celia Hannon. 2007. Their Space. Education for a digital generation. Available at http://www.demos.co.uk/publications/theirspace . Accessed 21 October 2008. p. 42-3.
  • 84. <ul><li>Facility does not mean ICT literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Need to be careful about assumptions we make </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 85. <ul><li>Competent or just confident ? </li></ul><ul><li>How to find the right info, then assess, validate, interpret, analyse, synthesise, critique, evaluate, put in context </li></ul><ul><li>The need to apply problem-solving and critical thinking skills </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS Oblinger, Diana G. and Brian L. Hawkins. 2006. The myth about student competency: Our students are technically competent. EDUCAUSE Review 41(2): 12-13. Available at http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Review/TheMythAboutStudentCompet/40622 . Accessed on 7 February 2009.
  • 86. <ul><li>Need to build ICT literacy through “ systematic teaching rather than incidental use ” </li></ul><ul><li>More personalised assessment </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS MCEETYA. 2007. National Assessment Program – ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10. Report 2005. Available at http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceetya/nap_ictl_2005_years_6_and_10_report-press_release,22065.html . Accessed on 21 October 2008.
  • 87. <ul><li>You need to be ICT literate, too. </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS
  • 88. “ [T]he mindset of central network planners and administrators is often at odds with the increasingly user-centric nature of Internet applications and tools, limiting innovation.” POINTS FOR CONSIDERATION STUDENT EXPERIENCES Johnson, Laurence F., Rachel Smith and Alan Levine. 2008. 2008 Horizon Report. Australia-New Zealand Edition. Available at http://connect.educause.edu/Library/Abstract/TakingtheHorizonProjectDo/47984 . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 .
  • 89. POINTS FOR CONSIDERATION “ Universities could benefit from delivering training which highlights the way students think about information , rather than the way they use technology itself.” Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 12.
  • 90. POINTS FOR CONSIDERATION “ [U]niversities are not currently perceived to be leading the way in developing new ways people can learn .” Joint Information Systems Committee. 2008. Great expectations of ICT: How Higher Education institutions are measuring up. Available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/publications/greatexpectations . Accessed on 7 Feb 2009 . p. 42.
  • 91. POINTS FOR CONSIDERATION The main point is to seize the opportunity to use this technology in the service of education.
  • 92. LICENCE

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