Framing your digital footprint: Edna keynote

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Educator paths and online activity; Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 and education; Impact of read/write culture on educators' professional development; Personal and professional learning journeys.

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Framing your digital footprint: Edna keynote

  1. 1. FRAMING YOUR DIGITAL FOOTPRINT Megan Poore
  2. 2. <ul><li>Web 2.0, Web 3.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Educators online: paths </li></ul><ul><li>Educators online: activity </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of read/write culture </li></ul><ul><li>Personal and professional learning journeys: issues </li></ul><ul><li>The future: Where are you headed? </li></ul>COVERAGE
  3. 3. <ul><li>Web 2.0 is not a software package </li></ul><ul><li>It is the ‘read-write’ web </li></ul>WEB 2.0
  4. 4. O’Reilly (2005: online) WEB 2.0 WEB 1.0 WEB 2.0 Ofoto Flickr Mp3.com Napster Britannica Online Wikipedia Personal websites Blogging Publishing Participation Content mgt systems Wikis Directories (taxonomy) Tagging (‘folksonomy’) Stickiness Syndication Software as package Software as service
  5. 5. <ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>MySpace, Face book </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasting </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging, RSS </li></ul><ul><li>YouTube </li></ul><ul><li>Social bookmarking </li></ul>WEB 2.0
  6. 6. Source: http://kosmar.de/archives/2005/11/11/the-huge-cloud-lens-bubble-map-web20/
  7. 7. Lankshear and Knobel (2006: 1) Mindset 1.0 Mindset 2.0 The world is appropriately interpreted, understood and responded to in broadly physical industrial terms. The world cannot adequately be interpreted, understood and responded to in physical-industrial terms only. Value is a function of scarcity Value is a function of dispersion Products as material artifacts Products as enabling services. Tools for producing Tools for mediating and relating Focus on individual intelligence Focus on collective intelligence Expertise and authority ‘located’ in individuals and institutions Expertise and authority are distributed and collective; hybrid experts Space as enclosed and purpose specific Space as open, continuous and fluid Social relations of ‘bookspace’; a stable ‘textual order’ Social relations of emerging ‘digital media space’; texts in change
  8. 8. O’Reilly (2005: online)
  9. 9. <ul><li>The long tail </li></ul>O’Reilly (2005: online) WEB 2.0 DESIGN PATTERNS
  10. 10. Cosmos (2007: online) WEB 2.0 DESIGN PATTERNS
  11. 11. <ul><li>Users add value </li></ul><ul><li>Some rights reserved </li></ul><ul><li>Perpetual beta </li></ul><ul><li>Co-operate, don’t control </li></ul><ul><li>Constructivism </li></ul>O’Reilly (2005: online) WEB 2.0 DESIGN PATTERNS
  12. 12. TECHNOLOGY TO WATCH Horizon Report (2007) Horizon Report(2008) 2007 2008 User-created content Grassroots video Social networking Collaboration webs Mobile phones Mobile broadband Virtual worlds Data mashups New scholarship and forms of publication Social operating systems Educational gaming Collective intelligence
  13. 13. <ul><li>User-created content </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile phones </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual worlds </li></ul><ul><li>New scholarship and forms of publication </li></ul><ul><li>Educational gaming </li></ul>TECHNOLOGY TO WATCH: 2007 Horizon Report, EDUCAUSE (2007)
  14. 14. <ul><li>Grassroots video </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration webs (group docs, online meetings, info and data swapping) </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile broadband (mobile access) </li></ul>TECHNOLOGY TO WATCH: 2008 Horizon Report, EDUCAUSE (2008)
  15. 15. <ul><li>Data mashups (combining data from different sources to create new understandings of the data) </li></ul><ul><li>Collective intelligence (Wikipedia and Freebase; practice in knowledge construction) </li></ul>TECHNOLOGY TO WATCH: 2008 Horizon Report, EDUCAUSE (2008)
  16. 16. <ul><li>In denial </li></ul><ul><li>In between </li></ul><ul><li>Into it </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: ATTITUDES
  17. 17. Alan AtKisson (1991) EDUCATOR PATHS: ATTITUDES
  18. 18. Image from Sue Waters’ wiki EDUCATOR PATHS: ATTITUDES
  19. 19. <ul><li>Where are you on the curve? </li></ul><ul><li>Do Meg’s ICT attitudinal survey </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: ATTITUDES
  20. 20. <ul><li>Two main paths: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The path you take, depends on your idea of trustworthiness </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: ATTITUDES
  21. 21. <ul><li>Departmental or institutional support </li></ul><ul><li>One to many </li></ul><ul><li>It’s about the department, institution, policies, guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Must cater for all </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL
  22. 22. EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL (schools)
  23. 23. EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL (schools)
  24. 24. EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL (schools)
  25. 25. EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL (schools)
  26. 26. EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL (H Ed)
  27. 27. <ul><li>‘ People’ support </li></ul><ul><li>One to many/many to many </li></ul><ul><li>It’s about ideas, sharing, niche, experience </li></ul><ul><li>Catering for niches </li></ul><ul><li>Catering for ourselves </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS INFORMAL
  28. 28. <ul><li>Blogs, wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook/social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Second Life </li></ul><ul><li>RSS, Social bookmarking </li></ul><ul><li>Video </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS INFORMAL
  29. 29. <ul><li>How to harness this in one location? </li></ul><ul><li>me.edu.au </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS INFORMAL
  30. 30. <ul><li>Share resources, ideas, thoughts, discoveries, current issues, experiences </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY BLOGS
  31. 31. ONLINE ACTIVITY BLOGS
  32. 32. ONLINE ACTIVITY BLOGS
  33. 33. <ul><li>Share individual interests </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If I like someone, I will follow their profile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Random discoveries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New networks with like-minded individuals </li></ul></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: FACEBOOK
  34. 34. ONLINE ACTIVITY: FACEBOOK
  35. 35. <ul><li>Groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share common experiences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional networks </li></ul></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: FACEBOOK
  36. 36. ONLINE ACTIVITY: FACEBOOK
  37. 37. <ul><li>To share stories, resources, info, solutions </li></ul><ul><li>To get answers </li></ul><ul><li>Should be using them better: to help us trouble-shoot the tech and teaching problems </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: DISCUSSIONS
  38. 38. ONLINE ACTIVITY: DISCUSSIONS
  39. 39. <ul><li>Share resources, discoveries </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging: nimble, agile </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for unpredictable, capricious connections </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  40. 40. ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  41. 41. ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  42. 42. ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  43. 43. ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  44. 44. <ul><li>Push AND pull </li></ul><ul><li>Personalised via feedreaders </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: BOOKMARKING
  45. 45. ONLINE ACTIVITY: RSS
  46. 46. ONLINE ACTIVITY: RSS
  47. 47. ONLINE ACTIVITY: RSS
  48. 48. ONLINE ACTIVITY: RSS
  49. 49. <ul><li>Share resources, PD </li></ul><ul><li>Create spaces for meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Create identity (as teacher, professional, as learner) </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: SECOND LIFE
  50. 50. ONLINE ACTIVITY: SECOND LIFE
  51. 51. <ul><li>Share access, copyright </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for personal re-mixing of others’ creations </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of distribution of work, flexible, responsive to my needs </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: CC
  52. 52. ONLINE ACTIVITY: CC
  53. 53. <ul><li>Create resources, for others </li></ul><ul><li>Repositories, links </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: WIKIS
  54. 54. ONLINE ACTIVITY: WIKIS
  55. 55. ONLINE ACTIVITY: WIKIS
  56. 56. <ul><li>Share resources </li></ul><ul><li>Help and support </li></ul><ul><li>Instruction, tutorials </li></ul><ul><li>Showcases of student/class work </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY: VIDEO
  57. 57. ONLINE ACTIVITY: VIDEO
  58. 58. ONLINE ACTIVITY: VIDEO
  59. 59. COMPARISON FORMAL INFORMAL Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Fixed Flexible Static Dynamic Stable Unpredicatable Standardised Flexible Proprietorial Personal Permancy Impermanent Cater for all Niche Sites, sites, sites People, people, people
  60. 60. <ul><li>Sites, sites, sites </li></ul><ul><li>Web 1.0, fixed, static, stable, conservative, standardised, white bread, unspectacular, middle-of-the-road, impersonal, permanency, proprietorship, bounded </li></ul><ul><li>Must cater for all ... </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: FORMAL
  61. 61. <ul><li>People, people, people </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0, nimble, flexible, dynamic, radical, energetic, spectacular, ends of the earth, personal, unpredictable, impermanency, vagrancy, grassroots, boundless, random </li></ul>EDUCATOR PATHS: INFORMAL
  62. 62. <ul><li>BUT! </li></ul><ul><li>We will eventually see a shift away from the tools --> people </li></ul><ul><li>SOSs </li></ul>ONLINE ACTIVITY
  63. 63. <ul><li>SOSs will take all the data available and aggregate it to give info about </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strength </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Depth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Endurance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>of our connections </li></ul></ul>WEB 3.0: SOSs
  64. 64. <ul><li>Social networking systems (Bebo, Facebook, MySpace) = uncontextualised info </li></ul><ul><li>Only the connections we’ve told them about. </li></ul><ul><li>This is a problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Have to enter the data myself every time. </li></ul>WEB 3.0: SOSs
  65. 65. <ul><li>Social graph </li></ul><ul><li>Every click of a mouse: ‘clickstream’ </li></ul><ul><li>If you take away the documents, you have the connections between people </li></ul>WEB 3.0: SOSs
  66. 66. SOSs Image from Google’s social graph page
  67. 67. <ul><li>No multiple log-ins </li></ul><ul><li>The system will focus on YOU, not the website or software service </li></ul><ul><li>e.g., SOS will integrate all flight info from various sources and present that: it is the flight that interests me, not the website </li></ul>SOSs
  68. 68. SOSs Network/devices/infrastructure Websites/software services Event/situation/me
  69. 69. <ul><li>Higher ed culture works against read/write culture </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly isolation </li></ul><ul><li>Aggressive competitiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Valuing product over process </li></ul><ul><li>Disciplinary nationalism </li></ul>IMPACT OF READ/ WRITE CULTURE Diane Zorn
  70. 70. <ul><li>More academics are pre-publihing via blogs etc -- does this count? </li></ul><ul><li>How to ‘control’ ideas? Can/should we do this? </li></ul><ul><li>How to control the amount of info available? Can/should we do this? </li></ul>IMPACT OF READ/ WRITE CULTURE
  71. 71. <ul><li>On research: more stuff is ‘findable’ </li></ul>IMPACT OF READ/ WRITE CULTURE
  72. 72. <ul><li>You and your students need expanded literacies: </li></ul><ul><li>Basic (reading, writing, numeric) </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific </li></ul><ul><li>Economic </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul><ul><li>Technological </li></ul><ul><li>Multicultural </li></ul><ul><li>Global awareness </li></ul>Pletka (2007: 47) IMPACT OF READ/ WRITE CULTURE
  73. 73. <ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Technical </li></ul><ul><li>Professional </li></ul>LEARNING JOURNEYS
  74. 74. <ul><li>How to ‘be’ online </li></ul><ul><li>Personal cultural changes </li></ul><ul><li>Our socialness online will look facile, underdeveloped to future generations </li></ul>LEARNING JOURNEY: SOCIAL
  75. 75. <ul><li>Keeping up with the latest </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing how and why to deploy certain tools </li></ul><ul><li>But let the students show you how they work </li></ul>LEARNING JOURNEY: TECHNICAL
  76. 76. <ul><li>Feeling uncomfortable with changing role </li></ul><ul><li>Learning more from colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Becoming multi-literate </li></ul><ul><li>Professional cultural changes </li></ul>LEARNING JOURNEY: PROFESSIONAL
  77. 77. <ul><li>We are NOT fighting above our weight </li></ul><ul><li>Education must be a driving force of the future </li></ul><ul><li>Must stop being reactive and passive -- must be active </li></ul>EDUCATION’S DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
  78. 78. <ul><li>Education has a poor reputation for holding on to systems foreverrrrrr </li></ul><ul><li>Must claim our market share: do not accept poor product, e.g., WebCT/Blackboard (web 1.0) </li></ul><ul><li>Use the free stuff and demand what we need </li></ul>EDUCATION’S DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
  79. 79. <ul><li>Must start leading </li></ul>EDUCATION’S DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
  80. 80. <ul><li>Compacts between management and teachers to encourage innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Must get support in policy to experiment and innovate and try stuff out </li></ul>EDUCATION’S DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
  81. 81. <ul><li>I don’t need to understand it all </li></ul><ul><li>I don’t have to know it all </li></ul><ul><li>I will learn it when I have to </li></ul><ul><li>I am no longer the sole repository of information in my life -- and that’s OK! </li></ul>YOUR NEW MINDSET
  82. 82. LICENCE

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