Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Social networking & adolescents
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Social networking & adolescents

596

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
596
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • the idea that one derives benefits – advice, information or social support – through their network of relationships 4
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Networking & AdolescentsAn analysis of how socialnetworking sites (SNS) affect thequality of adolescent peerrelationshipsI.D. 200741276
    • 2. What are social network sites?• They are a specific type of social media, based off ofWeb 2.0• Defined as▫ “a dedicated website or other application whichenables users to communicate with each other byposting information, comments messages, images, etc”(Oxford Dictionary)• Examples include:▫ Facebook▫ Twitter▫ MySpace
    • 3. SNS Usage• SNS emerged only a few short years ago in 1998with the launch of SixDegrees.com (Boyd &Ellison, 2008)• Since then the usage has grownexponentially, expanding into the teenagedemographics▫ Over 500 million people worldwide have anaccount▫ 13% of Facebook users in the UK are between theages of 13-17▫ 22% of teenagers log into their favourite SNSmore than 10 times a day (O‟Keeffe et al, 2011)
    • 4. Is spending this amount of time onSNS healthy for the development ofadolescent peer relationships?I will present both sides of theargument and then let you decide
    • 5. Reasons why:• Supplements face-to-face relationships• Expands social capital• Relieves social anxiety
    • 6. Supplements face-to-facerelationships
    • 7. Supplements face-to-face relationships• 10-20 years ago teenagers used the telephone tocommunicate with their friends when they wereapart• Now, sites like SNS provide a replacement forthis• They allow teens to remain in touch with theiroffline friends, even when they are not togetherphysically
    • 8. Supplements face-to-face relationships• According to the co-construction model, onlineand offline worlds are psychologically related(Subrahmanyam et al, 2008)• They are inseparable processes• It makes sense then, that the majority of teenswould use SNS to remain in touch with offlinefriends
    • 9. Supplements face-to-face relationships• As already mentioned, most youth use SNS inorder to maintain existing relationships• 80% of youth said they use it to communicatewith people in their offline world(Subrahmanyam and Greenfield, 2008)• Most common forms of activities are:▫ Making plans▫ Gossiping/catching up
    • 10. Supplements face-to-face relationships• Can help to strengthen long distancerelationships▫ How? It does not matter if you are in different timezones, making communication easier Allows you to keep in touch via messages andpictures
    • 11. Supplements face-to-face relationships• Teenagers believe that SNS have improved thequality of their relationship with their friends▫ In fact, the 2001 Pew Internet and American LifeProject study found that 46% of teenagerespondents believed the quality of theirfriendships did improve because of SNS(Subrahmanyam and Greenfield, 2008)
    • 12. Expands social capital
    • 13. Expands social capital• What is social capital?▫ Definition: “the idea that one derives benefitsthough their network of relationships” (Ahn, 2011)▫ This can include things such as: Receiving advice Getting access to information Receiving social support
    • 14. Expands social capital• These connections allow for bonding, whichresults in an increase in relationship strength• There are various activities on SNS such asFacebook that allow for an increase in socialcapital, including:▫ Status updates▫ Uploading photos▫ Commenting on friends‟ posts▫ Playing games with one another▫ Sharing interests (Ahn, 2012)
    • 15. Expands social capital• Also allows teens to make connections withothers that they may not have been able to makein their offline world▫ How? They can easily find out about friends whohave common interests and can also meet newfriends who are in their extended social network
    • 16. Relieves social anxiety
    • 17. Relieves social anxiety• The thought of communicating face-to-face canbe very traumatizing for some individuals• Social anxiety can be very crippling during theteenage years because one of the life tasks in thisage group is to form friendships• SNS provides an alternative outlet for theseindividuals to socialize
    • 18. Relieves social anxiety• In a 2002 study on teens aged 10-17:▫ 25% reported forming casual online friendships• In a 2006 study on teens:▫ They determined that introverts form friendshipsonline in order to compensate for their poorersocial skills▫ This lead to greater self-disclosure(Subrahmanyam and Greenfield, 2008)
    • 19. Relieves social anxiety• Teens feel that online communication is moreeffective for self-disclosure (Subrahmanyam andGreenfield, 2008)▫ This allows them to open up and become closer toothers▫ Once this original bond has been formed, it makesface-to-face communication easier for those withsocial anxiety
    • 20. Reasons why:• Sexual victimization• Cyberbulling• Lower quality communication
    • 21. Sexual victimization
    • 22. Sexual victimization• What is sexual victimization?▫ “Unwanted requests online to talk aboutsex, provide personal sexual information and/ordo something sexual” (Ybarra & Mitchell, 2008)
    • 23. Sexual victimization• Statistics▫ In the past year, 15% of youth aged 10-15 reportedexperiencing unwanted sexual solicitation online▫ However, only 4% of these incidences occurred onSNS (Ybarra & Mitchell, 2008)▫ Therefore, claims that SNS hosts an environment forsexual solicitation are not necessarily accurate• Although the risk is still present, teens are less likelyto experience unwanted sexual solicitations in SNScompared to other online sources such as instantmessaging and chat rooms
    • 24. Sexual victimization• The belief that most perpetrators are middleaged men lying about their age is not necessarilytrue, at least in regards to SNS▫ In fact, most incidences involve peers from theiroffline worlds• 95% of sex offenders are honest about their ageonline (Smith et al, 2008)
    • 25. Sexual victimization• Adverse effects:▫ SNS is instant – as soon as something is postedeveryone within a social network can see it▫ Therefore, being sexually victimized can behumiliating and traumatizing for the victim▫ If enough people see what has been posted, it canalso subsequently lead to cyberbullying
    • 26. Cyberbullying
    • 27. Cyberbullying• Definition:▫ “the deliberate use of digital media to communicatefalse, embarrassing or hostile information aboutanother person” (O‟Keeffe et al, 2011)• Prevalence:▫ In this digital age, it is becoming almost as prevalentas offline bullying▫ In a 2005 UK study, 20% of participants said they hadbeen a victim of cyberbullying (Subrahmanyam andGreenfield, 2008)
    • 28. Cyberbullying• This can have profound psychologicaleffects, including but not limited to:▫ Depression▫ Anxiety▫ Isolation▫ Suicide (O‟Keefe et al, 2011)• As a result of these negative psychologicaleffects, teens may detach themselves from theiroffline worlds and discontinue communicating withtheir peers
    • 29. Cyberbullying• Who are the perpetrators?▫ 2/3 of victims know their cyberbully in theiroffline world (Subrahmanyam andGreenfield, 2008)▫ This demonstrates that online and offline worldsare interconnected▫ If a teen is bullied online, it can negatively affecttheir offline social relationships. Reasons why arelisted on the following slide
    • 30. Cyberbullying• Causes negative social effects, such as:▫ Offline bullying Some cyberbullies do it because they are toocowardly to face the victim without a veil ofanonymity, however others are also traditionaloffline bullies▫ Social exclusion Peers may not want to be associated with the victimof the bullying due to fear or embarrassment
    • 31. Lower quality communication
    • 32. Lower quality communication• 37% of Facebook users have over 100 friends(Wilson et al, 2009)▫ The average teenager has even more• But are they really “friends” with all thesepeople? The answer seems to be: no▫ Teens typically only communicate with a smallportion of their online friends▫ In fact, the average teen makes no communicationwith over 50% of their “friends” on Facebook(Wilson et al, 2009)
    • 33. Lower quality communication• Instead of actually talking with one another, SNSlike Facebook provide teens with the ability to„like‟ each others posts and photos▫ This provides the illusion that they are keeping intouch, but in reality they are not actuallycommunicating with one another
    • 34. Lower quality communication• Fast-paced environment▫ The main purpose of SNS is to allow you to stayconnected to others, but it is done in a relativelyfast pace on the Internet▫ This may make it more difficult to haveserious, in-depth conversations▫ Teens may not want to reveal too much in writingfor fear that it may end up in the wrong handslater down the line, causing them distress
    • 35. Verdict?
    • 36. Verdict?• Original thesis statement:▫ “Is spending time on SNS healthy for thedevelopment of adolescent peer relationships?”• The author believes that social network sites doin fact provide a beneficial environment for thedevelopment of close peer relationships duringadolescence
    • 37. Verdict?• The pros of SNS far out weigh the cons inregards to the healthy development ofrelationships during adolescence▫ It allows for communication to occur, even whenteens are separated physically▫ Those who suffer from social anxiety are able tocommunicate with others and form meaningfulfriendships▫ Sexual victimization and cyberbullying are not ascommonplace on SNS as the media may lead us tobelieve
    • 38. Do you agree?
    • 39. Bibliography• Ahn, J. (2011). The effect of social network sites on adolescents‟ social and academic. Journal of the American Society for Information Science andTechnology, 62(8), 1435-1445.• Ahn, J. (2012): Teenagers‟ Experiences With Social Network Sites: Relationships toBridging and Bonding• Social Capital, The Information Society: An International Journal, 28:2, 99-109• Boyd, D., & Ellison, N. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, andScholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230.• Fanalyzer. (2013). Demographics date - Facebook UK. Fanalyzer. Retrieved April28, 2013, from www.fanalyzer.uk/demographics.html• OKeeffe, G. S. (2011). The impact of social media on children, adolescents andfamilies. American Academy of Pediatrics, 127, 800-805.
    • 40. Bibliography (continued)• Smith, P. K., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, M., Fisher, S., Russell, S., & Tippett, N. (2008).Cyberbullying: Its Nature And Impact In Secondary School Pupils.Journal of ChildPsychology and Psychiatry, 49(4), 376-385.• Subrahmanyam, K., Reich, S., Waechter, N., & Espinoza, G. (2008). Online And OfflineSocial Networks: Use Of Social Networking Sites By Emerging Adults. Journal of AppliedDevelopmental Psychology, 29(6), 420-433.• Subrahmanyam., & Greenfield. (2008). Online Communication And AdolescentRelationships. The Future of Children,18(1), 119-146.• Wilson, C., Boe, B., Sala, A., Puttaswamy, K., & Zhao, B. (2009). User interactions insocial networks and their implications . Computer Science Department, University ofCalifornia at Santa Barbara, 14.• Ybarra, M. L., & Mitchell, K. J. (2008). How Risky Are Social Networking Sites? AComparison Of Places Online Where Youth Sexual Solicitation And HarassmentOccurs. Pediatrics, 121(2), e350-e357.

    ×