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Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
Using vlookup in excel
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Using vlookup in excel

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  • 1.  
  • 2. <ul><li>VLOOKUP is an Excel function that can pull data from one worksheet to another, based on a primary key. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: given a spreadsheet of usage data and a spreadsheet of pricing data, prices can be pulled into the usage spreadsheet using the ISSN for each item. </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>Source spreadsheet: the spreadsheet from which you will pull data. (in our example, the pricing data) </li></ul><ul><li>Destination spreadsheet: the spreadsheet into which you are adding data. (the usage data) </li></ul><ul><li>Primary key: the column that uniquely identifies each row and is present in both spreadsheets. (the ISSN) </li></ul><ul><li>Source table: the subset of the spreadsheet that contains both the primary key column and all columns from which you are pulling information. </li></ul>
  • 4. <ul><li>Decide what column you are going to use for your primary key. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A value that is included in both spreadsheets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unique for each row </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ISSNs or other numeric identifiers are good </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Titles or other long strings that can vary slightly are not as good, because it can be hard to match them exactly. </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. <ul><li>Identify your source table </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A selection of your source spreadsheet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains all the information you want to pull into the destination spreadsheet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also contains primary key column </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It might be the entire source spreadsheet, or it might just be a few columns. </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. <ul><li>Make sure that your primary key column is the left-most column of your source table. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This might involve moving some columns around. </li></ul></ul>Source Table Primary Key Column
  • 7. <ul><li>Copy the column titles for your source table from the source spreadsheet to the destination spreadsheet. </li></ul>
  • 8. <ul><li>Click on the first cell of the first column in your destination spreadsheet where you would like to insert data from your source spreadsheet. </li></ul>
  • 9. <ul><li>From the Formulas tab, under Lookup & Reference, choose VLOOKUP </li></ul>
  • 10. <ul><li>The Function Arguments window opens. </li></ul><ul><li>Click on the first input box (lookup_value), then click the box in your DESTINATION sheet that contains the PRIMARY KEY for that row. </li></ul>Primary Key
  • 11. <ul><li>Click in the Table_array box, then switch to the source worksheet and select the entire source table. </li></ul><ul><li>You can now hand-edit the selection further if you need to in the box. </li></ul>
  • 12. <ul><li>In the col_index_num box, put the column number that you want to pull data from in the source spreadsheet, not the letter. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, if you want data from Column D, and your Primary Key (first column of your source table) is in Column B, you’ll put in 3. (column B is 1, C is 2, D is 3). </li></ul>
  • 13. <ul><li>For Range_lookup, enter “FALSE” to indicate that only exact matches for the primary key should be returned. Click OK. </li></ul>
  • 14. <ul><li>Once the formula is entered once, you can use fill down to finish the column, but first you need to fix some variables. </li></ul><ul><li>Put a $ before the column (letter) label indicating lookup value. </li></ul><ul><li>Put a $ before the column (letter) AND row (number) labels indicating source table </li></ul>
  • 15. <ul><li>You can now use fill-down to pull in values for the rest of the column </li></ul><ul><li>To use the formula for other columns, copy and paste the first row, changing only the col_index_num variable, then fill-down as necessary. </li></ul>

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