Using Web 2.0 Tools to Enhance Student Creativity in the Reading/Language Arts Block Memphis City Schools Technology Confe...
Introduction <ul><li>Achievement gaps among different groups of students have haunted reformers searching for equal educat...
Introduction (cont.) <ul><li>Teachers are often faced with a conflict between learners ’ needs and state mandated requirem...
Traditional versus Nontraditional Instructional Practices <ul><li>Educators desiring more for their students than a profic...
The Need for Creativity and Vocabulary Instruction <ul><li>Complexity aids students ’ comprehension (Williamson, Bondy, La...
Creativity <ul><li>Creativity provides a framework that could serve as a way to impact student achievement on a summative ...
Vocabulary <ul><li>Vocabulary plays a central role in high achievement on standardized assessments (Manzo, Manzo, & Thomas...
Creative Thinking Instruction <ul><li>Creativity provides complexity (Mashal, Faust, Hendler, Jung-Beeman, 2007; Grabner, ...
Creative Thinking Instruction (cont.) <ul><li>It has been difficult for educators to widely, effectively implement creativ...
Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration <ul><li>Divergent thinking can be described through fluency, flexibilit...
Vocabulary Development with Creativity <ul><li>Language learning utilizes different parts of the brain (Jincho, et al., 20...
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Mcs technology presentation slide show

  1. 1. Using Web 2.0 Tools to Enhance Student Creativity in the Reading/Language Arts Block Memphis City Schools Technology Conference Memphis, TN Dr. Megan Salemi & Lori Carter December 8-9, 2011
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Achievement gaps among different groups of students have haunted reformers searching for equal educational opportunities for all students (Kozol, 1991; Hilliard, 2000; Lomax, West, Harmon, Viator, & Madaus, 1995). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intelligence and achievement (Hilliard, 2003; Lomax, et al., 1994). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The No Child Left Behind Act </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Introduction (cont.) <ul><li>Teachers are often faced with a conflict between learners ’ needs and state mandated requirements (Brimijoin, 2005). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ High-stakes” standardized testing hinders teachers’ ability to use the best instructional strategies (Hurren, Rutledge, & Garvin, 2006; Caughy & O’Campo, 2006; Hilliard, 2003). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brain-based learning (Chavez-Eakle, Graff- Guerroro, Vaugier, & Cruz-Fuentes, 2007; Douville, 2004; Jitendra, Sczesniak, & Deatline-Buchman, 2005). </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Traditional versus Nontraditional Instructional Practices <ul><li>Educators desiring more for their students than a proficiency score are viewed as nontraditional thinkers in the current direction of educational policy (Doherty & Hilberg, 2007). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The repercussions associated with not meeting NCLB requirements reinforce instructional practices that increase students ’ scores on the yearly summative assessment (Liston, Whitcomb, & Borko, 2007; McMillian, 2003). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Language and discussion reflect a significant portion of student achievement (Vygotsky, 1978; Graves, 2007). </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Need for Creativity and Vocabulary Instruction <ul><li>Complexity aids students ’ comprehension (Williamson, Bondy, Langly, & Mayne, 2005; Hurren, et al., 2006). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative production involves fluency, originality, and elaboration of ideas (Mouchiroud & Lubart, 2001; Wu & Chiou, 2008). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fluency, originality, and elaboration are necessary for vocabulary development (Graves, 2007). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Variety of contexts aids students ’ comprehension (National Research Council [NRC], 2000, p. 51-78). </li></ul>
  6. 6. Creativity <ul><li>Creativity provides a framework that could serve as a way to impact student achievement on a summative assessment while also attending to the learner ’s educational needs regardless of race or socioeconomic background (Ford, Moore, & Milner, 2005; Tieso, 2005; Respress & Lutfi, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>The combination of fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration have become widely accepted as one way of defining and measuring creativity (Wang & Horng, 2002; Russo, 2004; Cramond, Matthews-Morgan, Bandalos, & Zuo, 2005; Matud, Rodriguez, & Grande, 2007). </li></ul>
  7. 7. Vocabulary <ul><li>Vocabulary plays a central role in high achievement on standardized assessments (Manzo, Manzo, & Thomas, 2006; Barry, Heubsch, & Burhop, 2008; Parcel & Geschwender, 1995). </li></ul><ul><li>Learning reorganizes neural networks and structure (NRC, 2000). </li></ul>
  8. 8. Creative Thinking Instruction <ul><li>Creativity provides complexity (Mashal, Faust, Hendler, Jung-Beeman, 2007; Grabner, Fink, Neubauer, 2007; Abraham & Windmann, 2007). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Torrance, 1974; Cramond, Matthews-Morgan, & Bandalos, 2005). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Martindale ’s (1978) findings that creativity is multi-faceted brain activity and not a fixed individual trait (Albrecht, 2002; El-Murad & West, 2004). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Instruction through a creative brain-based approach (Treffinger, et al., 2003a; Treffinger, et al., 2003b; Treffinger, et al., 2003c; Tate, 2003). </li></ul>
  9. 9. Creative Thinking Instruction (cont.) <ul><li>It has been difficult for educators to widely, effectively implement creativity instruction in educational settings (Plucker & Runco, 1998). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Narrowly focused studies (Sternberg & Lubart, 1999). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual differences in creative productions (Sternberg & Lubart, 1999). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can creativity be taught? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creative Problem Solving (Treffinger & Isaksen, 2005). </li></ul>
  10. 10. Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration <ul><li>Divergent thinking can be described through fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fluency = total number of responses given </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexibility = ability to switch quickly between different ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Originality = total number of responses that are statistically different from a group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elaboration = the number of problems found given a context (Osborn, 1963; Treffinger, et al., 2006). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IQ scores accounted for only 9% of the variance in creative achievement (Cramond, et al., 2005). </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Vocabulary Development with Creativity <ul><li>Language learning utilizes different parts of the brain (Jincho, et al., 2008; Mills, et al., 2004). </li></ul><ul><li>Vocabulary has been termed as the “middle ground in learning to read” (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2000, p. 1). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is especially true for struggling readers (Braze, et al., 2007). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Poor readers in third through fifth grade increased word recognition skills significantly through higher order language learning (Gaskins, et al., 1988). </li></ul>

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