Catesol 2010 vocabulary presentation HW Kang
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CATESOL 2010 Presentation: Vocabulary by Hee-Won Kang

CATESOL 2010 Presentation: Vocabulary by Hee-Won Kang

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    Catesol 2010 vocabulary presentation HW Kang Catesol 2010 vocabulary presentation HW Kang Presentation Transcript

    • Developing a Breadth and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge CATESOL 2010 Santa Clara, CA, April 24, 2010 Hee-Won Kang Sonoma State Universit y
    • Vocabulary Instructional Techniques
      • 1.  Assist students in integrating the new words with their background knowledge.
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      • 2. Assist students in developing elaborated (expanded) word knowledge.
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      • 3. Actively involve students in learning new words.
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      • 4. Help students acquire strategies for independent vocabulary development.
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      • 5. Provide repetition of the words to build ready accessibility of their meanings.
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      • 6. Have students engage in meaningful use of the words.
      (Carr & Wixson,1986; Nagy, 1988)
    • What does it mean to know a word?
      • Knowing the concepts that the word represents
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      • Degrees of concept knowledge: continuum from none to varying degrees of knowledge to full knowledge
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      • Knowing the associations that the word evokes
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      • Developing links to interconnections and associations among concepts in a vast network of interconnected concepts in long term memory.
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    • What does it mean to know a word?
      •   Knowing the word’s collocations
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      • The meaning of a word is often connected with the words it is generally associated with.
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      • Knowing that the word may have different meanings
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      • Distinction between homonymy and polysemy
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      • Other “knowings,” such as a word’s connotations, its social and stylistic limitations, its derivational possibilities, etc.
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    • Simple Word Activities
      • Dictionary
      • Encourage your student to make their own dictionary by putting together several sheets of paper and writing at the top of each page a new word he/she has recently learned. Have the student write their definition of the word underneath. This dictionary can be illustrated. This activity can turn into a story (using LEA).
      • Bookmarks
      • Provide students a blank bookmark and encourage them to illustrate it with scenes from a favorite book.
      Many of these activities would be suitable for the beginning language learner as well as second language learners. Kang, H. W. & McClure, J. 1997. Project Tutor: A Cross Age Tutoring Program – Training Manual
    • Simple Word Activities
      • Posters
      • Make alphabet posters with the student. Utilize fun characters, i.e. “z” is for zebra, and hang on the wall. Capital letters are usually easier for children to learn first. Visit the chart again often to remind and reinforce the learning.
      • Scrapbook
      • Have the student label pictures they find interesting from magazines. Cut out the pictures and paste in a book format. Go over the pictures and words several times in order to reinforce the learning.
      Many of these activities would be suitable for the beginning language learner as well as second language learners. Kang, H. W. & McClure, J. 1997. Project Tutor: A Cross Age Tutoring Program – Training Manual
    • Simple Word Activities
      • Lists
      • Model for the student a list you might make. Have the student make their own list, relevant to their lives. Practice writing, reading, and oral language skills with this exercise.
      • Letters
      • Letter writing is a fun way to work on writing skills. You may want to start by writing a note to your student and asking them to write back, thereby modeling this experience.
      Many of these activities would be suitable for the beginning language learner as well as second language learners. Kang, H. W. & McClure, J. 1997. Project Tutor: A Cross Age Tutoring Program – Training Manual
    • BIOPOEM
      • You can use this activity to get to know learners by observing the content of their writing. Ask the learners to write a poem about themselves using the following format:
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      • line 1 first name
      • line 2 four adjectives describing yourself
      • line 3 “Lover of (three things)”
      • line 4 “Who gives (three things)”
      • line 5 “Who fears (three things)”
      • line 6 “Who would like to see (three things)”
      • line 7 “Resident of
      • line 8 last name
    • BIOPOEM
      • Encourage learners to modify their poems, if they’d like. The following sample poem uses the basic format but adds a few lines.
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      • Pam
      • Happy, excitable, plain, nosey
      • Lover of chocolate, books, dogs
      • Who feels lucky, happy, confused
      • Who needs mother, friends, help
      • Who gives love, help, attention
      • Who fears snakes, math teacher, heights
      • Who would like to see Disneyland, Yosemite, homeland
      • Resident of Santa Rosa
      • Lee
    • Story Schema
      • Includes information that an author will give us a:
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      • • setting
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      • • main character
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      • • conflict
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      • • resolution
      May, Frank B. 1990. Reading as communication: An interactive approach.
    • Informational Schema
      •   • a main idea and supporting details
      • • a cause and the resulting effects
      • • some effects and a possible cause
      • • some steps to follow in sequence
      • • a description of people, things, places, or events
      • • a problem and some possible solutions
      Includes expectations that an author will give us one or more of these: May, Frank B. 1990. Reading as communication: An interactive approach.
    • MAJOR EXPOSITORY STRUCTURES
      • Sequence: The author is trying to tell the reader how to do or make something.
      • Enumeration: The author lists things and usually tells a little about each one.
      • Cause and Effect: The author presents one or more effects or results and provides the reader with one or more causes for them.
      May, Frank B. 1990. Reading as communication: An interactive approach.
    • MAJOR EXPOSITORY STRUCTURES
      • Description: The author wants to tell you what something is or looks like.
      • Problem/solution: The author presents a problem or two, then gives you his or her solution.
      • Comparison/contrast: The author tells you how things are alike and different.
      May, Frank B. 1990. Reading as communication: An interactive approach.
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    • Semantic Mapping
      • Choose a word or topic related to classroom work.
      • List the word on a large chart tablet or on the chalkboard.
      • Encourage the students to think of as many words as they can that are related to the selected key word and then to list the words by categories on a sheet of paper.
      • Students can share the prepared list orally and all words are written on the class map in categories.
      • Students can gain further practice in classification by labeling the categories on the semantic map.
      • Discussion of the semantic map is, perhaps, the most important part of the lesson. The purpose of the exercise is to encourage students to become aware of new words, to gather new meanings from old words, and to see the relationships among all the words.
      Heimlich, J. E. & Pittelman, S. D. 1986 . Semantic Mapping: Classroom Applications . Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
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    • Pittelman, S.D., Heimlich, J. E., Berglund, R. L., & French, M. P. 1991. Semantic Feature Analysis . Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
    • Pittelman, S.D., Heimlich, J. E., Berglund, R. L., & French, M. P. 1991. Semantic Feature Analysis . Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
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    • Nagy, W. E. (1988). Teaching vocabulary to improve reading comprehension . Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
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