A Proposal to Refine Concept Mapping
     For Effective Science Learning

    Meena Kharatmal & Nagarjuna G.
   {meena, na...
outline

    concept maps in science education
●



    point  out  problems  in  concept  maps  for 
●


    learning
   ...
concept maps 

    two  dimensional  graphical  representation  of 
●


    one's  knowledge  of  a  domain  (Novak  &  Go...
mainly used for knowledge elicitation
●



    used in research studies for meaningful learning
●



        review  of  ~...
assumptions
    to understand is to establish relations
●


    to educate is to help organize concepts
●


    learning i...
Comparing the knowledge profile 
                   of a novice and an expert
                Profile of Novice           ...
Concept map on “life in the ocean”




                     Martin, Mintzes, Clavijo (IJSE, 2000)
Refined concept map on “life in the ocean” 
                                                                             O...
Traditional Concept Map                   Refined Concept Map
     (using several linking words)            (using minimum...
Refined concept map on “life in the ocean” 
                                                                             O...
Hierarchy
        ... the number of valid hierarchies in the most branched 
           segment of the map to be counted (N...
Example




Novak, & Gowin (1984): Learning how to 
learn, Cambridge University Press. (p. 16)
Example
Example
Refined

 Living things


   Includes



Plants   Animals

 e.g.         e.g.

          My dog
An oak
Attributes




             Mintzes, et.al. IJSE (2002), p. 653
Attributes
Size
  Attributes                           Shark

                                                                       ...
Cross­links




              Mintzes, et.al. IJSE (2002), p. 653
Critique of concept maps

    ambiguity  in  linking  words,  lack  of  rigor  in 
●


    concept mapping (Costa et. al. ...
Refinements
    using  a  minimal  set  of  linking  words  (relation 
●


    types) to represent large number of concept...
Observations
We found that:

    linking  words  are  chosen  from  a  set  of  NL  and 
●


    hence results in ambiguit...
Proposed assessment model of using 
refined concept mapping techqnique
to sum up

    expert's  depict    knowledge      structure              using 
●


    unambiguous, consistent, parsimoni...
References
    Ausubel,  D.,  Novak,  J.,  and  Hanesian,  H.  (1978).    Educational  Psychology:  A  Cognitive  View.  N...
Martin  B.  L.,  Mintzes,  J.  J.,  &  Clavijo,  I.  E.  (2000).  Restructuring  knowledge  in  biology:  Cognitive  proce...
Thankyou
  meena@hbcse.tifr.res.in


www.hbcse.tifr.res.in/~meena


    www.gnowledge.org/
A Proposal to Refine Concept Maps for Effective Science Learning
A Proposal to Refine Concept Maps for Effective Science Learning
A Proposal to Refine Concept Maps for Effective Science Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

A Proposal to Refine Concept Maps for Effective Science Learning

2,726

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
4 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,726
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
4
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "A Proposal to Refine Concept Maps for Effective Science Learning"

  1. 1. A Proposal to Refine Concept Mapping For Effective Science Learning Meena Kharatmal & Nagarjuna G. {meena, nagarjun}@hbcse.tifr.res.in Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education TIFR, Mumbai, India September 5, 2006 CMC2006, San Jose, Costa Rica
  2. 2. outline concept maps in science education ● point  out  problems  in  concept  maps  for  ● learning point  out  problems  in  concept  maps  for  ● evaluation of concept maps  propose some refinements in concept maps ● propose  an  assessment  model  based  on  ● refinements in the concept map
  3. 3. concept maps  two  dimensional  graphical  representation  of  ● one's  knowledge  of  a  domain  (Novak  &  Gowin,  1984)  based on Ausubel's theory of classroom learning  ● (Ausubel, et.al., 1978) constructed  using  concepts,  linking  words,  ● branching, hierarchy, cross­links, examples progressive  differentiation,  incorporate  ● subsumption,  integrative  reconciliation  (Mintzes,  et. al. 1998)
  4. 4. mainly used for knowledge elicitation ● used in research studies for meaningful learning ● review  of  ~150  studies  on  concept  mapping:  – concept  maps  helps  students  gain  meaningful  learning,  enhance  the  integration  and  retention  of  knowledge (Mintzes et.al. 1997) comparing  successive  concept  maps:  conceptual  – change  in  a  group  of  biology  students  as  they  gained  mastery  of  the  domain  (Carey  1986;  Wallace & Mintzes 1990) ­­­ use of more number of  critical  concepts  and  propositions,  more  intricate  hierarchical  structure,  branching  patterns,  and  occurrence of cross­linkages
  5. 5. assumptions to understand is to establish relations ● to educate is to help organize concepts ● learning involves restructuring i.e. conceptual  ● change misunderstanding is due to incorrect  ● organization of concepts science cannot be ambiguous, inconsistent,  ➔ illogical scientific knowledge (representation) must be  ➔ explicit
  6. 6. Comparing the knowledge profile  of a novice and an expert Profile of Novice  Profile of Expert Knowledge loose form, uneconomical, cohesive, integrated, parsimony, Structure ambiguous relations unambiguous relations     Knowledge periphery      core concepts                               Organization   Approach superficial principled, accurate, deep Theories concrete, fragmentary, abstract, global, consistent,      inconsistent, particular, diffuse universal, precise Reasoning implicit and intuitive explicit and articulate Brewer & Samarapungawan, (1991)
  7. 7. Concept map on “life in the ocean” Martin, Mintzes, Clavijo (IJSE, 2000)
  8. 8. Refined concept map on “life in the ocean”  Ocean Consists of linking words Includes Living Beings Non­living Beings (Biotic) Habit (Abiotic) Habitat Animals Plants Produces Geological Chemical Physical Seagrass Plankton Pleuston Nekton Algae Vertebrates Invertebrates Cnidaria Chlorophyta Arthropoda Fish Mammal Current Phytoplankton Wave Phaeophyta Porifera Wind Zooplankton Rhodophyta Mollusca Organic Crustal plate Inorganic boundaries Agnatha Osteichthyes Carnivora Pinnipeda Holoplankton Chonodrichthyes Cetacea Sirenia Meroplankton Ca Cl Ligands K Na Co3 Odonteceti Constructive Shark Mysteceti Rays Conservative Destructive
  9. 9. Traditional Concept Map  Refined Concept Map (using several linking words) (using minimum i.e. 5 relation types) consists of / consists mainly of consists of ● can be classified as includes ● of the ocean are live in (habitat) ● aspects are live as (habit) ● including produces  ● like ● which are ● creates ● unambiguous, precise, includes 4 orders parsimoniously used relation types ● can be either / are either ● wide variety of relation types  has 2 groups / have 3 groups / has 3  (but not many) ●      classes / includes 4 orders / include  different dimensions      phyla / have 3 types
  10. 10. Refined concept map on “life in the ocean”  Ocean Consists of Hierarchy Includes Living Beings Non­living Beings (Biotic) Habit (Abiotic) Habitat Animals Plants Produces Geological Chemical Physical Seagrass Plankton Pleuston Nekton Algae Vertebrates Invertebrates Cnidaria Chlorophyta Arthropoda Fish Mammal Current Phytoplankton Wave Phaeophyta Porifera Wind Zooplankton Rhodophyta Mollusca Organic Crustal plate Inorganic boundaries Agnatha Osteichthyes Carnivora Pinnipeda Holoplankton Chonodrichthyes Cetacea Sirenia Meroplankton Ca Cl Ligands K Na Co3 Odonteceti Constructive Shark Mysteceti Rays Conservative Destructive
  11. 11. Hierarchy ... the number of valid hierarchies in the most branched  segment of the map to be counted (Novak & Gowin, 1984,  p. 107) Hierarchies are scored based on the levels ● Graphical representation of the levels does not  ●    follow from the logical definition of hierarchy  One has to validate the hierarchy:  logical criteria ­­­ must use the same relation type  ● (Mayr, Cruse, Lyons, etc.) hierarchy is the logical criteria of knowledge  ● organization
  12. 12. Example Novak, & Gowin (1984): Learning how to  learn, Cambridge University Press. (p. 16)
  13. 13. Example
  14. 14. Example Refined Living things Includes Plants Animals e.g. e.g. My dog An oak
  15. 15. Attributes Mintzes, et.al. IJSE (2002), p. 653
  16. 16. Attributes
  17. 17. Size Attributes Shark Size small Teeth Part of medium large types/includes Live in Used for Size Fins Reef Food chain Bottom of ocean Salt water Eat Research Tiger shark Great white Sand shark Blue shark Whale shark Hammerhead shark Attribute Types Attribute Values Size Small Medium Large
  18. 18. Cross­links Mintzes, et.al. IJSE (2002), p. 653
  19. 19. Critique of concept maps ambiguity  in  linking  words,  lack  of  rigor  in  ● concept mapping (Costa et. al. 2004) non­rigourous  in  methodology    (Kremer  1995;  ● Sowa 1984, 2006) lack of knowledge representation (KR) methods  ● (Canas & Carvalho 2004) ... ●
  20. 20. Refinements using  a  minimal  set  of  linking  words  (relation  ● types) to represent large number of concepts focus  on:  nature  of  linking  words  (relation  ● types) focus  on:  logical  criteria  while  assigning  ● hierarchy distinction  between  monadic  relation  ● (attribution) and diadic relation (proposition) scientific knowledge must be logical, consistent ● transformation from implicit to explicit ●
  21. 21. Observations We found that: linking  words  are  chosen  from  a  set  of  NL  and  ● hence results in ambiguity CYC ­­­ organizing common sense knowledge ● GO,  MBO  ­­­  organizing  biological  database  using  ● is­a relation Science  Education  ­­­  67  relations  used  to  link  ● about 2,300 concepts (Fisher, 1990) Biology  Education  ­­­  6  relation  types  used  to  ● link  about  75  concepts  to  create  a  refined  concept  map  of  a  biology  chapter  (Kharatmal,  2006)
  22. 22. Proposed assessment model of using  refined concept mapping techqnique
  23. 23. to sum up expert's  depict  knowledge  structure  using  ● unambiguous, consistent, parsimonious nature expertise  can  be  achieved  when  the  characteristics  ● mentioned above are implemented if during the course of learning a novice (student) is to  ● be  transformed  into  an  expert  then  it  is  essential  that  the novices are trained to organize their knowledge like  an expert does
  24. 24. References Ausubel,  D.,  Novak,  J.,  and  Hanesian,  H.  (1978).    Educational  Psychology:  A  Cognitive  View.  New  York:  Holt,  Rinehart  and  ● Winston. Arnaudin,  M.  A.,  Mintzes,  J.  J.,  Dunn,  C.  S.,  &  Shafer,  T.  H.  (1984).    Concept  mapping  in  college  science  teaching.    Journal  of  ● College Science Teaching, 117—121. Canas,  A.  J.  and  Carvalho,  M.  (2004).    Concept  maps  and  AI:  An  unlikely  marriage?      In    Proceedings  of  SBIE  2004:  Simp sio  ● Brasileiro  de  Inform tica      na  Educa o,  Manaus,  Brasil.  Simp sio  Brasileiro  de  Inform tica  na  Educa o,    Manaus,  Brasil.        http://www.ihmc.us/users/acanas/Publications/ConceptMapsAI/Canas­CmapsAI­Sbie2004.pdf. Carey, S. (1986).  Conceptual change and science education.   American Psychologist, 41(10), 1123­­1130. ● Costa, J. V., Rocha, F. E., & Favero, E. L. (2004).  Linking phrases in concept maps: A study on the nature of   inclusivity.  In A. J.  ● Canas,  J.  D.  Novak,  &  F.  M.  Gonzalez  (Eds.),    Concept  Maps:      Theory,  Methodology,  Technology.  Universidad  Publica  de  Navarra, Pampalona,   Spain. Fisher, K. (1990).  Semantic networking: The new kid on the block.   Journal of Research in Science Teaching,  27(10), 1001­­ ● 1018. IHMC CmapTools (2004). The Website of CmapTools. http://cmap.ihmc.us ● Kharatmal, M. (2006).  Concept map on cell structure and function. At IHMC Public Cmaps  Meena (India)  Cell  Structure and  ● Function    Cell  Structure  and  Function.              http://skat.ihmc.us/servlet/SBReadResourceServlet?rid=1139090479160_113084903_8482&partName=htmltext Kremer,  R.  (1995).  The  design  of  a  concept  mapping  environment  for  knowledge  acquisition    and  knowledge  representation.    ● Proceedings of the 9th International Knowledge Acquisition Workshop. Kuhn, T. (1962) The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. USA: University of Chicago Press. ● Markham,  K.  M., Mintzes,  J.  J.  &  Jones,  M.  G.  (1994).    The  concept  map  as  a research  and  evaluation  tool: Further  evidence   of  ● validity.   Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 31(1), 91—101.
  25. 25. Martin  B.  L.,  Mintzes,  J.  J.,  &  Clavijo,  I.  E.  (2000).  Restructuring  knowledge  in  biology:  Cognitive  processes  and  metacognitive  reflections. International Journal of Science Education, 22(3), 303­323. Mintzes, J. J. (In Press).  Knowledge restructuring in biology: Testing a punctuated model of conceptual change.   International Journal of  Science and Mathematics Education. Mintzes, J. J., Wandersee, J., & Novak, J., (Eds.). (1998).  Teaching Science for Understanding ­­­ A Human  Consctructivist  View.   USA: Academic Press. Mintzes, J. J., Wandersee, J. H., & Novak, J. D. (1997).  Meaningful Learning in Science: The Human Constructivist  Perspective. In  Gary D. Phye (Ed.), Handbook of Academic Learning: Construction of Knowledge (pp. 405­ 47).  USA: Academic Press. Nersessian, N. J. (1998). Conceptual change. In W. Bechtel, & G. Graham (Eds.), A Companion to Cognitive  Science. Blackwell,  Malden, MA. 155­166. Nagarjuna, G. (working paper). From Folklore to Science. Paper presented at the Eighth International History,  Philosophy, Sociology &  Science Teaching Conference, Leeds, UK, July 15­18, 2005. Nagarjuna, G. (1994). The Role of Inversion in the Genesis, Development and the Structure of Scientific  Knowledge. Ph.D. Thesis,  Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology,  Kanpur, India. http://cogprints.org/4340/ Novak, J. D., & Gowin, D. B. (1984). Learning How to Learn. New York: Cambridge University Press. Sowa, J. (2006). Concept mapping. Talk presented at the AERA Conference, San Francisco.  http://www.jfsowa.com/talks/cmapping.pdf Sowa, J. (1984).  Conceptual Structures: Information Processing in Mind and  Machine.  USA: Addison­Wesley  Publishing Company. Thagard, P. (1992). Conceptual Revolutions. USA: Princeton University Press. Thompson, T. L., & Mintzes, J. J. (2002). Cognitive structure and the affective domain: On knowledge and feeling in  biology.  International Journal of Science Education, 24(6), 645­600. Vosniadou,  S.  &  Ioannides,  C.  (1998).  From  conceptual  development  to  science  education:  A  psychological  point  of  view.  International Journal of Science Education, 20(10), 1213­1230. Wallace, J. D., & Mintzes, J. J. (1990).  The concept map as a research tool: Exploring conceptual change in biology.   Journal of  Research in Science Teaching, 27(10), 1033—1052.
  26. 26. Thankyou meena@hbcse.tifr.res.in www.hbcse.tifr.res.in/~meena www.gnowledge.org/

×