Watch Me Grow 2009-2010 Calendar

1,381 views
1,285 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,381
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Watch Me Grow 2009-2010 Calendar

  1. 1. Watch me Grow Healthy, Happy and Strong! A CALENDAR for MICHIGAN FAMILIES 2009 2010
  2. 2. Newborn Screening Saves Lives! Michigan law requires the screening of all newborn infants for rare but serious disorders which can be treated if identified early. m Early diagnosis, treatment or other interventions can prevent irreversible disabilities and even death. m Your birthing hospital staff or midwife will collect a screening specimen ideally between 24 and 36 hours of age for testing. m Check with your pediatric health care provider about your baby’s newborn screening results. REMEMBER . . . Newborn screening detects certain treatable medical disorders. Confirm with birthing staff that your newborn infant has received a newborn screening test. To learn more about newborn screening and genetic disorders, visit the Michigan Department of Community Health website at www.michigan.gov/newbornscreening or For more information contact the Michigan Newborn www.migeneticsconnection.org. Screening Program toll-free at 1-866-673-9939 or e-mail us at mdch-newbornscreening@michigan.gov.
  3. 3. Creating Your Family Health History What is a family health history? A family health history is a collection of information about diseases that run in your family, along with eating habits, activities, and environments which your family members share. How do I obtain family health history information? Talk to your family members! Use family events like holidays or birthday celebrations as an opportunity to gather information. Collect information on yourself, your parents, your brothers and sisters, your children and other extended family members such as aunts/uncles and grandparents. What should I ask? Learn basic information such as: date of birth/death, ethnicity or race, and cause of death. Find out about any health conditions in your relatives as well as the age which symptoms started. Be sure to ask about a history of birth defects, cancer, mental health disorders, developmental delays, heart disease, and pregnancy complications How can MAGC help? including miscarriage, stillbirth and infertility. The mission of the Michigan Association of Genetic Counselors (MAGC) is to champion quality genetic counseling services in What do I do with my family health history information? the State of Michigan. Genetic counselors are specially trained • Create a family health history tree — a drawing of your relatives to provide information and support to families who are affected and their health history. by a genetic condition, or the possibility of one. • Share the information with your relatives. For more information about family health • Share the information with your health care provider and find history and other genetic resources, visit out more about the diseases in your family and what you can do www.magcinc.org, www.geneticalliance.org to prevent them. or www.hhs.gov/familyhistory.
  4. 4. Getting Fit for Pregnancy . . . . . . is a great way to take control of your health to improve the odds of a healthy pregnancy for you and your baby. Plus, take these steps — before and during pregnancy — to better health for mother and baby: ) Eat a variety of foods with plenty of ) Wash hands often, especially when vegetables, fruits and fortified grain caring for young children. It’s the best products. way to reduce the spread of infection. ) Take a vitamin with 400 mcg (0.4 mg) ) Practice safer sex/use condoms to folic acid every day—it helps to protect against sexually transmitted prevent some kinds of birth defects. diseases (STD). ) Have a medical check-up before ) Live smoke-, alcohol- and drug-free. you get pregnant. Discuss health problems and healthy changes you ) Avoid using hot tubs and saunas when can make to get fit for pregnancy. pregnant or planning pregnancy. ) Ask your doctor about the safety of ) Eat fully cooked meat. If you eat Great your medicines or supplements in Lakes fish, follow the Michigan Fish pregnancy. Advisory. Call 1-800-648-6942 or visit www.michigan.gov/mdch-toxic. ) Find out if tests (like x-rays) and procedures are safe during pregnancy. ) Don’t handle cat litter. Avoid rats, mice and other rodents—they may ) Talk to your doctor if you have a spread infections that can harm child or other family member with a unborn babies. birth defect, genetic disorder or developmental disability. ) Avoid toxic substances and chemicals at home and work. ) Get prenatal care early and keep every appointment! For more information on birth defects and possible risk factors, contact: March of Dimes Pregnancy and Michigan Birth Defects Program National Center on Birth Defects Organization of Teratology Newborn Health Education Center Call: 1-866-852-1247 (toll-free) and Developmental Disabilities Information Specialists E-mail: askus@marchofdimes.com E-mail: BDRFollowup@michigan.gov Call: 1-800-232-4636 (toll-free) Call: 1-866-626-6847 (toll-free) Visit: www.marchofdimes.com Visit: www.MIGeneticsConnection.org Visit: www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Visit: www.otispregnancy.org
  5. 5. January is Birth Defects Prevention Month! 2009 January sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday December February 1 Have you had your 2 3 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S furnace checked this 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 winter? 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 28 29 30 31 NEW YEAR’S DAY 4 Folic Acid Awareness Week 5 6 7 8 9 Share a funny story 10 with your kids! 11 12 13 Washing hands 14 15 16 17 prevents colds. 18 19 20 21 22 Let your child read 23 24 a story to you. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY Folic Acid — Every 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Woman, Every Day!
  6. 6. February is Responsible Fatherhood Awareness Month! Responsible Fathers are Men Who: w Put their children’s interest before their own. w Serve as role models to their children (leading by example). w Separate other relationship issues from their relationships with their children. w Play an active role in their child’s emotional and academic development. Nurturing Men — Thriving Children — Healthy Families Hey Dad! What do you want your relationship with your child to look like 20 years from now? What are you doing right now to achieve that relationship? Be the Best Dad You Can Be — Be Interested, Be Involved! Proud Fathers-Proud Parents www.michigan.gov/dhs Governor Jennifer Granholm has declared February as Responsible Fatherhood Awareness Month in order to provide an opportunity for Michigan citizens to learn more about how fathers impact the lives of their children. Fathers who actively participate in the lives of their children diminish the risk of childhood poverty, mental illness, juvenile delinquency, early sexual activity, teen pregnancies, substance abuse and failure to complete high school, among many other things.
  7. 7. "Fatherlessness is the most harmful demographic trend of this generation. It is the leading cause of declining child well-being in our society." —David Blankenhorn 2009 February sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday February is Dental 1 2 Medicine should be 3 4 5 6 7 Health Month taken as directed. Ask your doctor. GROUNDHOG DAY Ask your child to National Child 8 9 10 help you plan a fun 11 12 13 14 Passenger Safety Week family activity. ST. VALENTINE’S DAY Healthy breakfasts 15 16 17 18 19 are a great way to 20 21 start your day! PRESIDENTS’ DAY Turn space heaters off when you leave 22 23 24 25 Read to your baby 26 27 28 and young child a room. daily. ASH WEDNESDAY January March S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 31
  8. 8. Lead Poisoning Is Preventable! Tell your health care provider that your child must be tested for lead poisoning if 1) your insurance is Medicaid/MIChild or 2) you live in one of Michigan’s 14 target communities (Battle Creek, Benton Harbor, Dearborn, Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Hamtramck, Highland Park, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Lansing, Muskegon/Muskegon Heights, Pontiac, and Saginaw). Find out the age of your home. If it was built before 1978, ask someone from the health department about special cleaning tips. Ask your babysitter/daycare provider if their facility is “leadsafe.” If anyone in the home has a job or hobby involving lead, find out about “take-home” lead. When you (or anyone else) is doing maintenance or renovation in your home, require the use of “leadsafe work practices.” If you are pregnant (or planning a pregnancy), talk to your health care provider about your present (and past) environmental lead exposures. For further information see www.michigan.gov/leadsafe or contact: ■ Childhood Lead Poisoning ■ Lead Hazard Remediation Program ■ Your county health department’s Prevention Program 866-691-LEAD (866-691-5321) Childhood Lead Poisoning 517-335-8885 or 888-322-4453 To find professionals to help identify and control lead Prevention Program To learn more about lead poisoning prevention, blood paint hazards and to learn how to remodel and repaint lead testing, sources and management of hazards, a older homes safely. speaker for your group, and to get the name of a lead program contact at a local health department.
  9. 9. For information about the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, call (517) 335-8885 or (888) 322-4453. 2009 March sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday March is Save Your Vision 1 2 Use dental floss to clean between teeth. 3 4 5 6 7 Month: Vision USA Turn clocks ahead and check smoke 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 detector batteries. DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME BEGINS PURIM BEGINS Celebrate your National Poison 15 16 17 family. Create a 18 19 20 21 Prevention Week family tree! ST. PATRICK’S DAY FIRST DAY OF SPRING Re-read a favorite 22 23 24 25 26 27 story. 28 Add chopped apple February April 29 or sliced banana to 30 31 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S pancakes. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  10. 10. ® April is the Month of the Young Child Early Years Are Learning Years™ . . . Make Them Count! Children’s early years are the foundation for growth and development. Children are constantly developing and learning. What they are learning depends on their physical health, social-emotional health, relationships, and daily interactions and experiences. The 2009 Month of the Young Child® Focus Weeks highlight children’s development. MOYC® 2009 Focus Weeks April 1–11 Physical Development April 12–18 Social-Emotional Development April 19–25 Cognitive Development April 26–30 Language and Literacy Help celebrate the Month of the Young Child® For information: (517) 336-9700 or (800) 336-6424 E-mail: MOYC@MiAEYC.org Web site: www.MiAEYC.org Month of the Young Child and MOYC are registered service marks of the Michigan Association for the Education of Young Children.
  11. 11. Call MiAEYC, (517) 336-9700 or (800) 336-6424, for more information on Month of the Young Child®. 2009 April sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday March May S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Bend and stretch and 1 2 3 4 reach for the sky! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 Exercise daily with your 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 child. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 29 30 31 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 Stage a home fire 11 drill this month. PALM SUNDAY PASSOVER GOOD FRIDAY 12 Recognize and show 13 14 15 16 17 18 appreciation for your child’s efforts and accomplishments. EASTER SUNDAY 19 20 21 22 23 Encourage children 24 25 over age 2 to drink water. The brain needs to be properly hydrated to be alert. EARTH DAY National Infant 26 27 Read aloud to your 28 29 30 April is Month of the Young Child® and Immunization week child everyday. It is Child Abuse Prevention Month. essential for language development and for Call MiAEYC, (517) 336-9700 or (800) 336-6424, for information on Month of the Young Child. preparing your child to succeed as a reader. Call Children’s Trust Fund, (517) 373-4320, for information on Child Abuse Prevention Month.
  12. 12. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Your first thought when you wake up and your last one before you fall asleep is your family. Their health and future mean everything to you. The Food Stamp Program cares, too. That is why they offer FREE nutrition education for you and your family. You already know that healthy eating is important for the entire family. And you know the Food Stamp Program provides help with food if times get tough. Michigan State University Extension nutrition education can also help you: e Cook easy, quick and tasty meals that your whole family will love. e Get your kids to eat more fruits and vegetables and like them. e Stretch your food dollars. e Get your family to be more physically active and have fun. Contact your local MSU Extension Office to learn more! This program is partially funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Department of Human Services and the Michigan Nutrition Network at Michigan State University Extension. MSU is an affirmative-action, equal-opportunity provider and employer. Michigan State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, religion, age, height, weight, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, marital status, family status or veteran status. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program can help provide a healthy diet and nutrition assistance to people with low income. To find out more, contact your local DHS office, check online at http://www.mfia.state.mi.us/mars/index.asp or call 1-800-481-4989 for the Food and Nutrition Helpline.
  13. 13. Hugs and smiles are encouraging! 2009 May sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday April June S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Run cold water for 1 2 several minutes before 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 drinking or cooking 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 with it. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 3 4 5 Go to the library. 6 7 8 9 CINCO DE MAYO Make sure everyone 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 gives Mom a hug today! MOTHER’S DAY 17 18 Iron-rich foods: lean 19 20 21 22 23 meat, eggs, beans, greens and cereals. 24 25 26 27 28 Schedule an eye 29 30 exam. 31 MEMORIAL DAY
  14. 14. HEAD START A Child and Family Development Program What Head Start offers you and your child: % A preschool program for children of income-eligible families and families of special needs children, at no cost % Nutritious snacks and meals % A learning environment sensitive to children’s individual and group needs % Activities fostering cognitive, emotional, social and physical development % Inclusion of children with disabilities % A variety of ways for parents to volunteer and participate in their child’s learning % Opportunities and support for families % Medical and dental services for children % Programs designed to meet the needs of families all over Michigan: • Migrant Head Start • Early Head Start (for children from birth to age three and their families) • Native American Head Start • Full Day, Full Year as well as Half Day • Home Base Head Start • Bilingual support services
  15. 15. For more information about Head Start in Michigan, please call the Michigan Head Start Association at 517-374-MHSA (6472) or toll free 1-866-320-6472, or visit our web site at www.mhsa.ws. 2009 June sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday Small, round and 1 2 3 4 5 6 sticky foods are choking hazards. 7 8 9 10 11 Milk and fruit shakes 12 13 make nutritious snacks! 14 15 16 Raise your child in a 17 18 19 20 smoke-free world. If you smoke, QUIT. FLAG DAY Make sure 21 22 23 24 25 26 Put crayons and 27 everyone gives paper out for your Dad a hug today! child. FIRST DAY OF SUMMER FATHER’S DAY May July 28 29 30 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 1 2 1 2 3 4 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31
  16. 16. Great Start Readiness Program Elements of a high-quality Great Start Readiness Program classroom include: Adults and Children are Play is Children’s Work. Partners in Learning. Adults: Classroom Materials: Their work: Outdoor Play: • Observe and listen to children. • Encourage exploration, • Is displayed (e.g., • Encourage children to talk about • Provides children with many experimentation and artwork, photos of block what they do. choices about how they play (e.g., discovery. structures, samples of climbing, pouring, jumping, • Follow children’s lead in play. beginning writing). • Appeal to multiple senses. sorting or pretending, playing • Stems from the children’s alone or in groups). • Use children’s words. • Are available in a large interests and ideas. • Offer suggestions to extend play. amount of real and • Provides an opportunity for manufactured materials. • Is prominently displayed adults to actively engage with • Use a variety of teaching at children’s eye level. children as they supervise strategies such as open-ended outdoor play. questioning. Children who experience just one year in the Great Start Readiness Program experience significant developmental gains. http://www.highscope.org/content.asp?contentID=225. Michigan Department of Education • Early Childhood Education and Family Services • (517) 373-8483 • www.michigan.gov/ece
  17. 17. Eat 5 or more servings of FRUITS and VEGETABLES every day for better health! 2009 July sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday June August S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Child Safety 1 2 3 4 Restraints: it’s the 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 law! 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 28 29 30 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 INDEPENDENCE DAY 5 6 Talk about the 7 8 9 10 11 things you see and hear. Children love to 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 plan picnics. 19 20 21 22 23 Cold water cures a 24 25 hot day! 26 27 Protect your 28 29 30 31 children from second-hand smoke.
  18. 18. Michigan 4C Association One Call for Child Care 1-866-424-4532 Resources for Parents Seeking Child Care: Quality Assured Program • Learn how to identify a high quality child care provider. • Talk to a Child Care Resource and Referral Specialist to identify options for child care. • Find a quality licensed child care provider in your area using a network of 16 regional 4C offices. Many of the offices have achieved accreditation by the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies. Training and Resources for Child Care Providers: Michigan Child Care Futures • Topics covered in trainings include Basic and Advanced Topics in Child Care, Infant and Toddler Care, Inclusive Child Care, Child Care Administration, Blood Borne Pathogens (BBP), Communicable Diseases, and more. Courses range from 5–16 hours. • Individuals can use these trainings towards meeting state licensing and Child Development Associate (CDA) requirements, to obtain CEUs, and to earn college credit for some courses. • Training is offered throughout the State of Michigan at times and locations convenient to child care providers. • Support is available for accreditation for child care centers through the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC) Accreditation for child care family and group homes. Visit our website for more information: http://www.mi4c.org
  19. 19. August is Children’s Learning and Vision Month! 2009 August sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday July September 1 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 26 27 28 29 30 31 27 28 29 30 2 3 4 5 Protect your 6 7 8 summer fun— use sunscreen! Eat some raw 9 10 11 12 13 14 Write letters with 15 vegetables for a your finger in snack. sand. 16 17 Catch your child 18 19 20 21 22 being good! RAMADAN BEGINS 23 24 25 Keep babies 26 27 28 29 under 6 months out of direct sun. 30 31
  20. 20. Support for Families of Children with Special Needs The Children’s Special Health Care Services (CSHCS) is part of the Michigan Department of Community Health. CSHCS is for children and some adults with special health care needs, and their families. CSHCS Family Phone Line 1-800-359-3722 • Solve a CSHCS problem • Reach your local health department toll-free • Get information and resources related to children with special needs for parents, grandparents and other relatives Family Center for Children and Youth available to Michigan young adult(s) between with Special Health Care Needs the ages of 16–25 to help cover expenses to All Michigan families of children with special attend a conference related to their diagnosis, needs may take part in: condition, or treatment, or a conference related to disability advocacy, and education. ä Family Support Network of Michigan — Our parent-to-parent network offers Specialty Medical Care information and emotional support. We cover diagnostic tests to check for a special Parents can ask for one-to-one support health need. from a trained peer who also has a child with special needs. More than 2,700 diagnoses qualify for CSHCS coverage. Eligibility is determined based on ä Heart-to-Heart Information Update — each person’s medical report. Our free monthly sheet covers CSHCS, events and resources just for families of For children—and some adults—who qualify, children with special needs. CSHCS provides: ä Relatively Speaking — Children and teens ä referral to specialty doctors. that are siblings of children with special needs can share their unique issues in a ä coverage of office visits, prescription drugs, weekend of structured activities. special equipment and more. ä Conference Scholarships — We help ä referral to services to help families care for parents of children with special needs go to children at home and maintain routines. conferences related to the diagnosis, treatment or care of their children with ä coverage of transportation costs to medical special needs. Scholarships are also Photo by The Center for Children with Chronic Illness and Disability, University of Minnesota appointments related to an eligible diagnosis.
  21. 21. Encourage your kids to express themselves! 2009 September sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday August October 1 2 Breast milk — the 3 4 5 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Gold Standard. 1 1 2 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 23 24 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 LABOR DAY Healthy babies sleep 13 14 15 16 A visit to your 17 18 19 on their backs alone child’s school in their own crib eases the without extra transition. blankets or bedding. ROSH HASHANAH BEGINS 20 Use describing words 21 22 23 24 25 26 when you talk. RAMADAN ENDS FIRST DAY OF AUTUMN National Adult 27 28 29 Talk about good 30 Immunization Week health habits with your child. YOM KIPPUR
  22. 22. Protect Your Child from Scary Diseases Your child needs vaccines at these ages: d Birth d 12–15 months d 2 months d 18 months d 4 months d 4 – 6 years d 6 months d 11–12 years All children from 6 months through 18 years of age should get vaccinated against the flu every year. Protect your baby 1. Be sure your baby gets all of her (or his) vaccines on time. 2. Get your vaccines on time, too, including flu vaccine every year. 3. Make sure that family members and other people who spend time with your child have gotten their vaccines. You Can Keep Your Child Healthy! For more information call your doctor, your local health department or 1-888-76-SHOTS. For more information, go to www.vaccinateyourbaby.org. Michigan Department of Community Health
  23. 23. October is Halloween Safety Month! 2009 October sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday September November S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 1 Pack a piece of fruit 2 3 in everyone’s lunch. 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 27 28 29 30 29 30 National Fire 4 5 6 7 Teach your child a 8 9 10 Prevention Week nursery rhyme. 11 12 13 Buckle up! 14 15 16 17 COLUMBUS DAY Prevention is well- 18 19 20 21 22 Time is the best 23 24 balanced meals. thing you can spend on your child. 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 HALLOWEEN
  24. 24. WIC helps Women, Infants and Children WIC may help if you: È Are pregnant or breastfeeding. È Have an infant or children up to age 5. È Want to improve your family’s health with good nutrition. The Women, Infants and Children Program (WIC) may be able to help with the right food and advice on nutrition, health care and immunizations. WIC supports every mother’s choice to breastfeed. WIC helps working families, too. Call today 1-800-26-BIRTH Michigan Department of Community Health Michigan WIC Program www.michigan.gov/wic • www.wichealth.org WIC is an equal opportunity program
  25. 25. Babies were born to be breastfed! 2009 November sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday 1 2 Remember to vote! 3 4 5 6 Breast milk or 7 iron-fortified formula is essential during the first year. DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME ENDS ELECTION DAY 8 Untreated ear 9 10 11 12 13 14 infections can lead to hearing loss. VETERAN’S DAY 15 16 17 18 19 Put books out 20 21 where she can get to them. Keep all medicines 22 23 24 25 What are you 26 27 28 in their original thankful for? containers. THANKSGIVING DAY October December 29 Thank your 30 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S children whenever they are being 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 helpful! 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 27 28 29 30 31
  26. 26. Project Find Everyone can learn. Helping Young People Succeed in School 1-800-252-0052 www.ProjectFindMichigan.org Young People Develop At Different Rates Sometimes, a young person can have more difficulty learning TTY: 517-668-2505 than others do. He or she may have difficulty seeing or hearing, service available for persons with hearing as well as difficulty getting along with others, or learning in and/or speech difficulties. school. These are reasons for concern. Why Is an Evaluation Important? Project Find refers individuals for a free evaluation to help identify specific conditions that prevent a young person from learning. The evaluation is the first step in getting the help he or she needs. A free evaluation is available for individuals from birth to age 26. Information Is Confidential t All information contained in the evaluation and Projec Find educational program is confidential. Everyo ne can learn. Who Can Help? Anyone can refer individuals, birth to age 26, for special educational services. It can be a parent, a foster parent, a teacher, a counselor, a friend, a relative, or the person who finds learning difficult. STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION This project material was produced and distributed through an IDEA (2004) Mandated Activities Project Kathleen N. Straus, President John C. Austin, Vice President for Project Find Michigan awarded by the Michigan Department of Education. The opinions expressed Carolyn L. Curtin, Secretary Marianne Yared McGuire, Treasurer herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Michigan Department of Education, State Nancy Danhof, NASBE Delegate Elizabeth W. Bauer Board of Education or the U.S. Department of Education, and no endorsement is inferred. This document Reginald M. Turner, Board Member Eileen Lappin Weiser is in the public domain and may be copied for further distribution when proper credit is given. For further EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS information or inquiries about this project, contact the Michigan Department of Education, Office of Jennifer M. Granholm, Governor Special Education and Early Intervention Services, P Box 30008, Lansing, Michigan 48909. .O. Michael P Flanagan Superintendent of Public Instruction .
  27. 27. Project Find Michigan 1-800-252-0052 www.ProjectFindMichigan.org Fax: 517-668-0446 TTY: 517-668-2505 service available for persons with hearing and/or speech difficulties. 2009 December sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday December is Toy 1 2 Talk about sounds 3 4 5 Safety Month that letters make. 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 HANUKKAH BEGINS How about baked 13 14 15 16 17 18 You are a star in 19 sweet potatoes for your family’s life! dinner? 20 21 22 Always leave 23 24 25 26 emergency instructions with your babysitter. FIRST DAY OF WINTER CHRISTMAS DAY KWANZAA BEGINS 27 28 Relax and hold 29 30 31 November January S M T W T F S S M T W T F S your baby close 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 during feeding. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
  28. 28. Parenting is for a Lifetime Good parenting includes: 1. Showing kids love, concern and respect at all times. 2. Giving kids a safe place to live and play. 3. Listening to what your kids are saying. 4. Helping your kids express all their feelings appropriately. 5. Giving your kids appropriate choices whenever possible. 6. Having reasonable rules that are understood by all. 7. Being and responsible and teaching your kids to be responsible. 8. Spending time together with your kids. 9. Setting an example by what you say and do. 10. Asking for help when you need it. The Michigan Foundation for Education LeadershipTM (MFEL) is a nonprofit organization established in 1990 to receive, hold, invest and administer funds and to make expenditures to aid in the fulfillment of educational needs and create new avenues for educational excellence throughout the State of Michigan.
  29. 29. Loving eye contact builds trust and security. 2010 January sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday December February S M T W T F S S M T W T F S January is Birth Defects Prevention 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 Month 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 28 29 30 31 28 NEW YEAR’S DAY Nursing moms 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 need healthy diets. 10 11 12 Try a new recipe 13 14 15 16 for your favorite vegetable. 17 18 19 20 21 22 Are dangerous 23 materials out of harm’s way? MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY 24 25 Trade off child 26 27 28 Teach your child 29 30 care with a friend. a new word. 31
  30. 30. Are You Concerned About Your Child’s Development? Don’t worry. But don’t wait. Call 1-800-Early-On. Does your baby Most parents wonder at times if their child is growing and developing like seem a little too quiet? other children. If you question how your child is developing, call Early On® Michigan to find out what you can do. Does she smile less than Early On helps families get the help they need for their children, from birth to you think she should? three years of age. Your child may be eligible for a free evaluation. If the evaluation shows that your child needs help, we’ll connect Is he having a hard you to the help you need, at little or no cost. time with his crawling Call 1-800-Early-On (1-800-327-5966) for free information or walking? about your child’s development and Early On services, or visit us on the web at: www.1800EarlyOn.org 1-800-Early-On (1-800-327-5966) TTY: (517) 668-2505 service available for persons with hearing and/or speech difficulties.
  31. 31. For information about Early On®, call (800) EARLY ON. 2010 February sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday February is Dental 1 2 Breastfeeding…a 3 4 5 6 Health Month gift of love that lasts a lifetime. GROUNDHOG DAY 7 8 9 10 11 Talk about a book 12 13 you’ve just read. National Child 14 15 16 17 Are your 18 19 20 Passenger Safety emergency Week numbers posted by the phone? ST. VALENTINE’S DAY PRESIDENT’S DAY ASH WEDNESDAY 21 22 23 24 25 26 Displaying 27 children’s artwork promotes self-esteem. January March Routine dental 28 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S visits should begin at age 1. 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 24 PURIM BEGINS 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31
  32. 32. From Polio to Prematurity The mission of the March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. The mission is carried out through programs of research, community services, education and advocacy. KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREMATURE BIRTH. Contact the March of Dimes Pregnancy & Newborn Health Education Center at askus@marchofdimes.com to answer your questions about: • Prematurity • Labor and Delivery • Breastfeeding • Preconception • Caring for your Baby • Newborn Screening and other health related mother/baby topics. Help give all babies their 9 months. If your baby is born too small or too soon — connect with other families who have or have had baby/babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Contact SHARE – an online community for parents of premature babies at www.shareyourstory.org. MARCH OF DIMES MICHIGAN CHAPTER www.marchofdimes.com/michigan • E-mail: MI630@marchofdimes.com
  33. 33. 2010 March sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday March is 1 2 A varied diet makes 3 4 5 6 Save Your Vision a healthy body. Month: Vision USA 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Turn clocks ahead 14 15 16 17 18 Work a puzzle with 19 20 and check smoke your child. detector batteries. DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME BEGINS ST. PATRICK’S DAY FIRST DAY OF SPRING 21 22 23 24 Point out words that 25 26 27 rhyme. February April 28 29 Make regular dental 30 31 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S checkups. 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 PALM SUNDAY PASSOVER 28 25 26 27 28 29 30
  34. 34. Make It Michigan 2 great ways to increase the number of Michigan grown fruits and vegetables that mothers and their young children eat. Project FRESH Farm to School Project FRESH provides participating Women, Infants and Programs that promote Michigan-grown and Michigan-produced Children (WIC) Program families with nutrition education, as well food in schools. These can include: as supplemental coupons to purchase Michigan-grown fresh fruits P School meals P Starting a school garden and vegetables. Coupons are redeemed at local farmer’s markets P Field trips to farms P Fundraisers using Michigan food and farm stands. P Cooking in the classroom A partnership between the USDA, the WIC division of the Michigan Department For more information contact the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems of Community Health and Michigan State University Extension. at Michigan State University, (517) 432-1612.
  35. 35. At home or at school — Make it Michigan! 2010 April sunday monday tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday March May S M T W T F S S M T W T F S April is Month of the Young Child® and Relax and hold your 1 2 3 Child Abuse Prevention Month. baby close during 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 feeding. Call MiAEYC, (517) 336-9700 or (800) 336-6424, for 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 information on Month of the Young Child. 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Call Children’s Trust Fund, (517) 373-4320, for 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 information on Child Abuse Prevention Month. 28 29 30 31 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 GOOD FRIDAY 4 5 Babies were born to 6 7 8 9 10 be breastfed. EASTER SUNDAY 11 12 13 You are your child’s 14 15 16 Don’t call medicine 17 best advocate. “candy.” 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 EARTH DAY 25 26 27 28 29 Talk about the 30 things you see and hear.
  36. 36. Michigan Family-to-Family Health Information & Education Center (F2FHIEC) e Educational Opportunities F2FHIEC offers onsite and on-line learning opportunities, available for families and professionals. e Family Phone Line Families can call health providers, local health departments, obtain health resources or seek and offer support to other families through our toll-free number. Interpreters are available to assist families who do not speak English. e Lending Library Books, videos, and informational pamphlets are available through our library. e Website A virtual center you can visit for information, education and/or parent-to-parent support. Visit: www.bridges4kids.org/f2f F2FHIEC is administered by the Family Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, a section of the Children’s Special Health Care Services (CSHCS) program of the Michigan Department of Community Health. It is funded by a federal grant from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The Center has 31 statewide partners. For More Information visit: www.bridges4kids.org/f2f or call 1-800-359-3722

×