Qatar Projects<br />A presentation by MEED<br />
Qatar facts<br />Cash-rich Qatar has a gross domestic product (GDP) of some $130bn<br />The population is small at 1.6 mil...
Qatar gross domestic product<br />e=estimate; f=forecast<br />Source: Qatar National Bank<br />
Qatar economy<br />The International Monetary Fund expects the economy to expand by 18.6 per cent in 2011<br />The officia...
Qatar infrastructure<br />Even before the World Cup was confirmed, Doha had a major infrastructure programme planned<br />...
Qatar World Cup 2022<br />The bid’s unique selling point is marrying 21st-century technology with financial largesse accru...
Announced and unawarded projects, February 2011<br />Source: MEED Projects<br />
Qatar oil, gas and industry<br />Activity in the energy sector is likely to be subdued in the medium term after unpreceden...
How MEED can help you<br />Subscribe to MEED magazine and MEED.com for dedicated Qatar and World Cupcoverage<br />Subscrib...
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Qatar Projects 2011 - 2022

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Business opportunities in Qatar - details of projects planned and under way in Qatar, including those planned for the World Cup 2022

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Qatar Projects 2011 - 2022

  1. 1. Qatar Projects<br />A presentation by MEED<br />
  2. 2. Qatar facts<br />Cash-rich Qatar has a gross domestic product (GDP) of some $130bn<br />The population is small at 1.6 million; expatriates, mostly male, far outnumber Qataris<br />It has been ruled by the Al-Thani family since the mid-1800s. In 1995 Crown Prince Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani deposed his father to become emir<br />Qatar has the third largest gas reserves in the world after Iran and Russia, despite its 11,600 square kilometres; in 2008, proven gas reserves were 25.37 trillion cubic metres<br />In 2006 Qatar became the world’s largest exporter and trans-shipper of liquefied natural gas (LNG), overtaking Indonesia<br />
  3. 3. Qatar gross domestic product<br />e=estimate; f=forecast<br />Source: Qatar National Bank<br />
  4. 4. Qatar economy<br />The International Monetary Fund expects the economy to expand by 18.6 per cent in 2011<br />The official budget surplus in 2010-11 is estimated at QR58.3bn, 12.1 per cent of GDP<br />Rising energy prices and production is expected to result in surpluses reaching $130bn by 2015<br />Sustaining gas export revenues will be essential if Doha is to avoid an excessive debt burden from the World Cup<br />There is a risk that high inflation, as seen in 2006-08, will return. Planning and sensible scheduling is critical, as is an early start to building transport projects<br />The sovereign wealth fund Qatar Investment Authority (QIA) holds assets that exceed $90bn<br />
  5. 5. Qatar infrastructure<br />Even before the World Cup was confirmed, Doha had a major infrastructure programme planned<br />It included $35bn for a new rail network, $20bn on roads and $25bn on real estate<br />Some $10bn was earmarked in 2010-11, including the New Doha International Airport and the New Doha Port<br />Most projects formed part of the winning 2022 proposal, so are likely to be implemented in the next five years<br />The Qatar-Bahrain landbridge was put on hold in June 2010 but will now get renewed attention<br />Over the next five years, Qatar will invest more than $40bn on centrepiece projects-a $25bn rail network, a $11bn new airport and a $5.5bn new deepwater seaport<br />
  6. 6. Qatar World Cup 2022<br />The bid’s unique selling point is marrying 21st-century technology with financial largesse accrued from hydrocarbons<br />The cost of building nine new World Cup 2022 stadiums and refurbishing three is comparatively small, at $3-4bn<br />But the associated transportation and social infrastructure will put spending over $100bn in the next decade. More than 65,000 new hotel rooms are to be built<br />There is still considerable work to be done in planning for 2017-2022<br />A key milestone in the World Cup delivery programme is the establishment of a permanent agency in Q2 2011. One of its first tasks will be to appoint a project manager<br />
  7. 7. Announced and unawarded projects, February 2011<br />Source: MEED Projects<br />
  8. 8. Qatar oil, gas and industry<br />Activity in the energy sector is likely to be subdued in the medium term after unprecedented investment in 2002-07<br />The moratorium on developing the North Field means no new gas export projects are likely before 2015<br />Following record investment in power, desalination and wastewater, Doha will only require new capacity in 2014-15<br />New ethane allocations mean Qatar will be one of the few Gulf states to proceed with new petrochemical schemes in the medium term<br />The under-construction Barzan gas development is expected to provide additional gas feedstock for steel and aluminium capacity<br />
  9. 9. How MEED can help you<br />Subscribe to MEED magazine and MEED.com for dedicated Qatar and World Cupcoverage<br />Subscribe to MEED Projects’ new Qatar Projects package to help you to win contracts in Qatar<br />Buy MEED Insight’s off-the-shelf Qatar Projects Report 2011-22<br />Attend MEED Events’ Qatar Transport event in Doha in June or Infrastructure Projects event in London in July<br />
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