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Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India
Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India
Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India
Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India
Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India
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Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India

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  • 1. World's Most Advanced Medical Treatment in India - Get free Expert Medical Opinion and Treatment Estimate Cost Men with Prostate Cancer have many Treatment Options: Best and Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer in India Prostate cancer generally affects men over 50 and is rare in younger men. It’s the most common type of cancer in men. It differs from most other cancers in the body, in that small areas of cancer within the prostate are very common and may stay dormant (inactive) for many years. Most of these cancers grow very slowly and so, particularly in elderly men, are unlikely to cause any problems. In a small proportion of men, prostate cancer can grow more quickly and in some cases may spread to other parts of the body, particularly the bones.
  • 2. Symptoms of Prostate Cancer A man with prostate cancer may not have any symptoms. Symptoms of prostate cancer are often similar to those of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Men observing the following signs and/or symptoms should see their physician for a thorough examination:  Urinary problems - Not being able to pass urine • Having a hard time starting or stopping the urine flow  Needing to urinate often, especially at night  Weak flow of urine  Urine flow that starts and stops  Pain or burning during urination  Blood in the urine or semen  Frequent pain in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs If you have any of these symptoms, you should tell your doctor so that problems can be diagnosed and treated. Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer PDigital rectal exam (DRE) : The doctor inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum and feels the prostate through the rectal wall for lumps or abnormal areas. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test:A test that measures the level of PSA in the blood. PSA is a substance made by the prostate that may be found in an increased amount in the blood of men who have prostate cancer. PSA levels may also be high in men who have an infection or inflammation of the prostate or BPH (an enlarged, but noncancerous, prostate). Transrectal ultrasound : A procedure in which a probe that is about the size of a finger is inserted into the rectum to check the prostate. The probe is used to bounce high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. Transrectal ultrasound may be used during a biopsy procedure. Biopsy :The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist. The pathologist will examine the biopsy sample to check for cancer cells and determine the Gleason score. The Gleason score ranges from 2-10 and describes how
  • 3. likely it is that a tumor will spread. The lower the number, the less likely the tumor is to spread. There are 2 types of biopsy procedures used to diagnose prostate cancer: Transrectal biopsy: The removal of tissue from the prostate by inserting a thin needle through the rectum and into the prostate. This procedure is usually done using transrectal ultrasound to help guide the needle. Transperineal biopsy: The removal of tissue from the prostate by inserting a thin needle through the skin between the scrotum and rectum and into the prostate. Staging of Prostate Cancer If the biopsy shows that you have cancer, your doctor needs to learn the extent (stage) of the disease to help you choose the best treatment. Staging is a careful attempt to find out whether the tumor has invaded nearby tissues, whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body. Some men may need tests that make pictures of the body: Bone scan: The doctor injects a small amount of a radioactive substance into a blood vessel. It travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones. A machine called a scanner detects and measures the radiation. The scanner makes pictures of the bones on a computer screen or on film. CT scan: An x-ray machine linked to a computer takes a series of detailed pictures of your pelvis or other parts of the body. Doctors use CT scans to look for prostate cancer that has spread to lymph nodes and other areas. You may receive contrast material by injection into a blood vessel in your arm or hand, or by enema. The contrast material makes abnormal areas easier to see. MRI: A strong magnet linked to a computer is used to make detailed pictures of areas inside your body. The doctor can view these pictures on a monitor and can print them on film. An MRI can show whether cancer has spread to lymph nodes or other areas.
  • 4. Stage I The cancer can't be felt during a digital rectal exam, and it can't be seen on an imaging study, such as ultrasound. Stage II: o The tumor is more advanced or a higher grade than Stage I, but the tumor doesn't extend beyond the prostate. It may be felt during a digital rectal exam, or it may be seen on a sonogram. It is detected either after a needle biopsy or surgery done for other reasons, i.e. resection of the prostate for benign enlargement. Stage III: o The tumor extends beyond the capsule (outer covering) of the prostate. The tumor may have invaded the seminal vesicles, but cancer cells haven't spread to the lymph nodes, bones or other organs. Stage IV: o The tumor may have invaded the bladder, rectum, or nearby structures (beyond the seminal vesicles). Advanced Treatment of Prostate Cancer Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. Your doctor will make recommendations that are best for each individual. The options include active surveillance (also called watchful waiting), surgery, radiation therapy, cryotherapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. The treatment that's right for you depends mainly on your age, the grade of the tumor (the Gleason score), the number of biopsy tissue samples that contain cancer cells, the stage of the cancer, your symptoms, and your general health. Surgery: Surgery is an option for men with early (Stage I or II) prostate cancer. It's sometimes an option for men with Stage III or IV prostate cancer. Before the surgeon removes the prostate, the lymph nodes in the pelvis may be removed. If prostate cancer cells are found in the lymph nodes, the disease may have spread to other parts of the body. If cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, the surgeon does not always remove the prostate and may suggest other types of treatment. After removing the prostate, the bladder is reconnected to the urethra (tube that men urinate through). Robotic laparoscopicsurgery: The surgeon removes the entire prostate through small cuts . A laparoscope and a robot are used to help remove the prostate. Instruments are passed through the small cuts and are used to remove the prostate. The surgeon uses handles below a computer display to control the robot's arms.
  • 5. Open surgery: The surgeon makes a large incision (cut) into your body to remove the tumor. There are two approaches:  Through the abdomen: The surgeon removes the entire prostate through a cut in the abdomen. The incision typically is from the umbilicus (belly button) down to the pelvic bone. This is called a radical retropubic prostatectomy.  Between the scrotum and anus: The surgeon removes the entire prostate through a cut between the scrotum and the anus. This is called a radical perineal prostatectomy. Laparoscopic prostatectomy: The surgeon removes the entire prostate through small cuts , rather than a single long cut in the abdomen. A thin, lighted tube (a laparoscope) helps the surgeon see. Other instruments are passed through the small cuts. These instruments are used to remove the prostate. TURP: A man with advanced prostate cancer may choose TURP (transurethral resection of the prostate) to relieve symptoms. The surgeon inserts a long, thin scope through the urethra. A cutting tool at the end of the scope removes tissue from the inside of the prostate. For more information visit: http://www.medworldindia.com https://www.facebook.com/medworld.india Please scan and email your medical reports to us at care@medworldindia.com and we shall get you a Free Medical Opinion from India’s Best Doctors. Call Us : +91-9811058159 Mail Us : care@medworldindia.com

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