01 24 Telenovelas Presenation

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01 24 Telenovelas Presenation

  1. 1. “ St orying ” across communities: Curricular intersections of literature and media exploring Latino/a children’s cultural practices and its implications to (bi)literacy pedagogies Carmen L. Medina 2010 Funding for this project came from: NCTE Research Foundation Grant Indiana University Summer Proffitt Grant Indiana University Office of the Vice-Provost for Research Creative Grant
  2. 2. Background Context: English language learners “re ading across communities” (Medina, 2010) <ul><li>1 year study Latino/a children reading and responding to bilingual literature (talk, writing and drama) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The students’ talk was grounded in a fluidity that merged ways across: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>people, places, spaces and times: global access and mobility </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>popular imaginaries: related to media, iconography, legends, oral narratives and visual symbols </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. New Emerging Questions <ul><ul><ul><li>How global discourses and resources are consumed, interpreted and produced by Latino/a children who have access to transnational experiences including Transnational Spanish Television Networks? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How a view of literacy as translocal opens up spaces in literacy curriculum design foregrounding culturally relevant experiences that allow Latino/a children to engage in reading and writing practices which reposition them as creative social actors and producers? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What are the cultural, social and critical affordances and contradictions in this pedagogy? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Purpose <ul><li>Work at the intersection of school literacies and media </li></ul><ul><li>Examine Latino/a children’s interpretative practices (possibilities and problems) consuming and producing multinational/global television media across contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Explore the potential for literacy pedagogies that support children from diverse linguistic backgrounds </li></ul>
  5. 5. Cultural Practices Across Contexts: Between Literacies and Biliteracies <ul><li>Ethno & Media Scapes (Appadurai, 1996) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Convergences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Translocalities (Creation of communities across places through shared cultural practices) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Transcultural Literacies: Examining literacy practices across contexts (Guerra, 1998; Sanchez, 2007) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Puerto Rican children negotiating a nation in flux <ul><li>Local community highly influenced by global networks such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Migratory movements </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>to and from USA—NYC & Orlando </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>to and from Dominican Republic and NYC </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High levels of commercialization & multinational industries </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>COSTCO, SAMS Club, K-Mart, Wal-Mart, Cellular phone companies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Industries: Refineries, pharmaceuticals, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Disappearance of local television networks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Substitute by Univision, Telemundo and English Cable </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Television </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Access to similar television programming as Latinos/as in the United States </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Theoretical Framework <ul><li>Media, globalization & literary studies </li></ul><ul><li>Globalization, Media & Literacy Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural production & literacy practices in a globalize world: borders are crossed and the mobility, access and flow of discourses and resources are central to people’s identities and their participation in literacy events. (Appadurai, 1996; Garcia-Canclini, 1990; Maira, Soep & Lipsitz, 2004; Blommaert, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Resituating literature within larger multilingual and multicultural media ecology: </li></ul><ul><li>how literature might be opened to interact with [the] study of other kinds of cultural texts? (Fitzpatrick, 2006 & 2009) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Theoretical Framework <ul><li>Sociocultural perspectives on hybridity in literacy curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Honoring, understanding and using out of school knowledge, literacy and linguistic practices as resources in school literacy practices. (Gutierrez, 2008; Gonzal e z, Moll & Amanti, 2004; Guerra, 2008; Albright et al. 2006; Leander, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Permeable Curriculum” in primary literacy education </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Allowing the interplay between teachers and children language and experiences (Dyson, 1993 & 2003). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Theoretical Framework <ul><li>Popular culture in literacy education: </li></ul><ul><li> Making visible children’s complex negotiations of social worlds (real and imagined) (Dyson, 2006; Evans, 2007; Mackey, 2003; Wolhwend, 2009; Vasquez, 2003 Marsh, 2004): </li></ul><ul><li>[W]e need to find out about and show interest in, and appreciate that children’s popular culture interests, their technological expertise, indeed their “cultural capital” (Bourdieu, 1991) are valued…in an attempt to make school more meaningful to them. (Evans, 2003, p.10) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Theoretical Framework <ul><ul><li>Storying </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reaffirming the role and significance of imaginative stories, literature and texts in students’ lives (Bruner, 1986 Gussin Paley, 2004; Dyson & Genishi, 1996; Barton & Booth, 1990; Sumara, 2002, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Storying” Multimodal practices through which children invoke, transform and critique imagined worlds at the intersection of their diverse, often conflicting, ideologies, languages, literacies and social and geographic locations (Enciso, Medina & Mart ínez, 2010). </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Methodology <ul><li>Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two year qualitative inquiry design (currently on 2nd year) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exploratory/Interpretative Approach (Erickson 1986) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Becoming critical ethnography </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Site </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public elementary school in urban community in Puerto Rico </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Puerto Ricans (local/immigrants) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Immigrants from Dominican Republic </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Methodology <ul><li>2nd & 3rd grade classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional literacy curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moving towards implementing literature based and process writing approaches </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3rd grade classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Boys 8 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Girls 11 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher 1 </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Methodology <ul><li>Data Collection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interests Interview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Individual & Focus group </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Field Notes: Before and during curricular experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video, audio & photographs during curricular experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audiotape meetings with teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collection of artifacts (writing, texts analyzed, drawings, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exit focus group interview (members’ check) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Curricular Experience <ul><li>Inquiry based curriculum: Students’ interests in Telenovelas (Berghoff, Egawa, Harste & Hoonan, 2000) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Telenovelas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>melodramatic fiction series produced and aired in most Latin American countries and also in the United States and other countries around the world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Devised and worked collaboratively with teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exploring and producing telenovelas as texts (January & March, 2009) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Deconstructing beauty discourses in media (May 2009) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Data Analysis <ul><li>Hybridity: Multiple worlds, resources and practices </li></ul><ul><li>Blommaert (2005) contextulization is a dialogical activity where l e arning is always a meeting of (at least) two minds and consciousnesses, creating results that cannot be reduced to either one of them. People have contextualisation universes: complexes of linguistic, cognitive, social, cultural, institutional, etc. skills and knowledge which they use for contextualising statements, and interaction involves the meeting of such universes (p. 44). </li></ul>
  16. 16. Data Analysis <ul><li>Performativity (Diamond, 1996) & Situated Meanings in Discourse (Gee, 1999) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ev ery performance, if it is intelligible as such, embeds features of previous performances: gender conventions, racial histories, aesthetic traditions,--political and cultural pressures, that are consciously and unconsciously acknowledged . (Diamond, 1996) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meanings are situated in relationship to history and in relationship to other texts and voices. (Gee, 1999) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Overall Coding: Modalities, Performativity & Hybridity
  18. 18. <ul><li>“ Experts” Reading Across: Knowledgeable about media and literary texts responses </li></ul><ul><li>Moving across telenovelas’ texts </li></ul><ul><li>Moving across literary texts </li></ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul><ul><li>Class Class: Social goods as reward and ultimate goal. Participation in higher class as reward for characters with “good” values. People are “saved” from poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>Violence </li></ul><ul><li>Literary texts: “Paper Bag Princess”, Multiple versions of “Little Read Riding Hood” </li></ul><ul><li>Television media texts </li></ul><ul><li>Oral analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Music </li></ul>Reading and Interpreting literary and media texts ** <ul><li>Official classroom discourse boundaries and out of school discourses </li></ul><ul><li>Between childhood and adulthood </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>“ Risky narratives” </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Television visual Images </li></ul><ul><li>Oral analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Written </li></ul><ul><li>Music </li></ul>Analyzing Telenovelas Hybridity: In/Out of School, Local/Global Worlds and Forms of Participation Performativity: Social discourses enacted (“a doing and a thing done”) Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  19. 19. <ul><li>Experiential knowledge: Personal, local, global media </li></ul><ul><li>Authorship: Writing cycle (brainstorming, drafts) and out school forms of writing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Styles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>themes, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>School, community, personal and global media structures and resources : Plots, Characters, Locations </li></ul><ul><li>Language: Spanish/English, Hip-hop style, local forms of Spanish language </li></ul><ul><li>Violence: Domestic, Street, Claiming possessions (including woman) </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Urban discourses </li></ul><ul><li>Marriage relationships & parenting </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>Religion </li></ul><ul><li>Class: Social goods as reward and ultimate goal. Participation in higher class as reward for characters with “good” values. People are “saved” from poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Print: Narrative, Street (graffiti), Script, ghost/mystery stories </li></ul><ul><li>Visual Images (including images of technology) </li></ul><ul><li>Music & Video </li></ul>Writing Telenovelas** Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  20. 20. <ul><li>Writing Cycle: Encouraging revisions within popular culture format </li></ul><ul><li>Text producers & Text Analysts </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation of power relations (teacher-student/producers-authors) </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied/ Performance </li></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Visual/Media </li></ul>Drama: Presenting telenovelas to producers Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  21. 21. Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event <ul><li>Spaces & Embodiment: fictional, school, community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beauty (characters) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Selection of locations across school w/ multiple meanings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reclaiming Authorship: Teacher-student/Directors-scriptwriters </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation of power relations (teacher-student/producers-authors) </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Violence </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied/ Performance </li></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul>Performing Images of Telenovelas
  22. 22. Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event <ul><li>Converging voices: Personal, local community, global media </li></ul><ul><li>Critical reading of out of school texts </li></ul><ul><li>Contradictions made visible through multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Acceptance and rejection of physical changes to fit the canon </li></ul><ul><li>Made visible corporate intentions to sell products using female beauty canon </li></ul><ul><li>Physical improvement related to self-improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul><ul><li>Print </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty Canon Drama: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perspectives of “Implicit & Implied Characters in “True Beauty” Ad </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Connections between personal, family and global media concepts of beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Critical readings of out of school texts </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty as constructed & fictional </li></ul><ul><li>Conscious consumption of media discourses </li></ul><ul><li>Media representation as goal/desired </li></ul><ul><li>Rejection of canon </li></ul><ul><li>Visual Texts </li></ul><ul><li>Print </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied </li></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing Beauty in Media: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Mothers’ Day” Shoppers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ True Beauty” Ad </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>Experiential knowledge: Personal, media and larger society </li></ul><ul><li>Authorship: Analysis and presentation of product(ion) (authors and media producers) </li></ul><ul><li>Readers: Classroom and social interpretative practices </li></ul><ul><li>Family relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship conflicts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Infidelity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child support </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Violence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Street </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Family </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied </li></ul>Analysis of performed texts** Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  24. 24. Reading and Interpreting Literary and Media Texts
  25. 25. Reading Across Texts & Media Worlds
  26. 29. Reading Across: Social Discourses of Beauty & Power Analysis <ul><li>“ Experts” Reading Across: Knowledgeable responding to media and literary texts </li></ul><ul><li>Moving across telenovelas’ texts </li></ul><ul><li>Moving across literary texts </li></ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul><ul><li>Class: Social goods as reward and ultimate goal. Participation in higher class as reward for characters with “good” values. People are “saved” from poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty & Gender Roles </li></ul><ul><li>Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Print texts: “Paper Bag Princess” </li></ul><ul><li>Television media texts </li></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied </li></ul>Reading and Interpreting literary and media texts Hybridity: In/Out of School, Local/Global Worlds and Forms of Participation Performativity: Social discourses enacted (“a doing and a thing done”) Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  27. 30. Without a heart there is no love G/Localizing Social Discourses in Writing & Performing Telenovelas
  28. 31. [Mom]-- I am happy and I live with my husband and with my son and my daughter that has just been born.
  29. 32. [Dad] -- Give me my children! [Mom] -- They are not your children. I gave birth to them! While the parents fought the children cried. [Mom or Dad] -- They are my children not your children!
  30. 33. [Mom] -- I will keep them! The children cried and cried until they wanted to decide to stay with one of the two. [Mom] -- Leave the house right now! And the children told their mother: [Child] -- Mom and where is dad staying? [Mom] --He is no longer your dad.
  31. 34. [Child] -- Why isn’t he staying in a house? [Mother] -- Because he is no longer living with us.
  32. 35. And the mother of the children felt bad because the father did not lived in a house. [Mother] --Children I feel bad because your father does not live in a house.
  33. 36. [Mother] -- Children do you want to keep your house and stay with me? [Child] -- We want to go with papi. Yes, mami, yes. [Mother] I will call him. [Mother on the phone]– You are drunk. I cannot believe it! – I will not get back with you. And the mother had called the father and he was drunk.
  34. 37. She called the father again and he was no longer drunk and the father said: [Father]-- I want to get back with you. [Mother]-- If you want to get back with me it is not to be with the children all time.
  35. 38. -- ok I will get back with you without being with the children all the time. An they lived happily.
  36. 39. Song You are everything to me I only believed in you And you came to be my religion You were everything and nothing else You were my voice you were my home In the middle of solitude a blessing But something strange happened The fairy tale ended You said goodbye and broke my heart How much I love you how much I hate you How much I carry you in my senses If I do not forget you it because of pure masochism Artist: Lola Title: Masokismo From the telenovela: Lola erase una vez (A modern Cinderella)
  37. 40. Writing & Performing Telenovelas <ul><li>Experiential knowledge: Personal, local, global media </li></ul><ul><li>Authorship: Writing cycle (brainstorming, drafts & revising) and out school forms of writing (telenovelas) </li></ul><ul><li>School, community, personal and global media structures and resources : Plots, Characters, Locations </li></ul><ul><li>Language: Local forms of Spanish language and telenovelas language </li></ul><ul><li>Spaces & Embodiment: fictional, school, community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beauty (characters) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Selection of locations across school w/ multiple meanings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Violence: Domestic </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Marriage relationships & parenting </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>Print: Narrative to Scripts </li></ul><ul><li>Visual Images (including images of technology) </li></ul><ul><li>Music & Video </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied & Spatial: Clothes, body language, school spaces </li></ul>Writing & Performing Telenovelas Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  38. 41. Looking Back at Performed Texts: Analyzing “Sin Coraz ón no Hay Amor”
  39. 44. Analysis: Looking Back at Written & Performed Texts <ul><li>Experiential knowledge: Personal, media and larger society </li></ul><ul><li>Authorship: Analysis and presentation of product(ion) (authors and media producers) </li></ul><ul><li>Readers: Classroom and social interpretative practices </li></ul><ul><li>Family relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship conflicts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Infidelity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child support </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Talk </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul><ul><li>Embodied </li></ul>Analysis of performed texts Hybridity: In & Out of School/Local & Global Worlds and Participation Performativity: Social discourses Modalities: Intertextuality Event
  40. 45. Findings & Significance <ul><li>Expansive literacy practices in classrooms: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Foregrounding interactions between global/local knowledge, in & out school knowledge, languages and children ways of “s t orying” supports in school literacy curriculum that positions children as successful participants in classrooms. </li></ul></ul>
  41. 46. Findings & Significance <ul><li>Devising curricular experiences, framing literacy as inquiry and including an analysis of everyday texts, makes visible children’s complex repertoires of practices, social discourses and identities through spaces to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>claim and reaffirm sense of authorship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>engage, understand and analyze texts building on children’s interpretative practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>make visible literacy skills and literacy knowledge </li></ul></ul>
  42. 47. Findings & Significance <ul><li>Going back and forth doing research at the intersection of immigrant and non-immigrant Latino/a children has provided me with an understanding of their extensive knowledge about global dynamics, literacies and politics. Putting this knowledge at the forefront of the ways literacy and biliteracy experiences are structured results in meaningful engagement with in-school reading and writing practices. </li></ul>
  43. 48. Implications for Biliteracy Pedagogies <ul><li>Potential for working in the intersections of larger multilingual media ecology (Fitzpatrick, 2006 & 2009): Foregrounding reading and writing across communities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contemporary Children’s Literature: Redefining genres and language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Super Cilantro Girl/La super ni na del cilantro (Herrera, 2003) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lucha Libre: The man in silver mask (Garza, 2007) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A movie in my pillow/Una pelicula en mi almohada (Argueta, 2001) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Se la vi (Youme, 2005) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid (Garza, 2008) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The arrival (Tan, 2007) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  44. 49. Implications for Biliteracy Pedagogies <ul><li>Multiple literacies and inquiry as a framework for working in biliteracy education </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Practices in reading and writing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stories and “storying”: Children as social actors, reading and writing </li></ul></ul>
  45. 50. Some Cautions <ul><li>Utopian vs. political vision of globalization. Consider multiple power relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Essentilizing students’ cultures and identities. Avoid an examination of cultural content versus an examination of histories of participation and engagement on cultural production and practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Further develop questions: New study working across contexts (Puerto Rico-Orlando-New York) </li></ul>

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