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MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint
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MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint

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Transcript

  • 1. MEDIA LANGUAGE SOUND
  • 2. SOUND • Sound is of vital importance to all media texts. The most important sound is likely to be the dialogue, plus any accompanying sounds such as those caused by movement or characters or objects. • However other sounds such as music will be added to the film to add meaning to the text.
  • 3. KEY AREAS IN SOUND • Diegetic and Non – diegetic Sound • Sound effects • Music • Voice-overs • Parallel & Contrapuntal Sound • Sound bridges
  • 4. DIEGETIC AND NON DIEGETIC SOUND • Sound originating from within the world of the media text is known as diegetic sound. This includes background sound and ambient sound. • Non-diegetic sound originates outside the text. This includes voice-overs and music. • Sound can also be used to hold together edited shots, which are rarely continuous.
  • 5. SOUND EFFECTS • The use of sound effects usually function as diegetic sound as they appear from elements within the film, even though such sound is usually added after post-production. • Sounds can be regarded as signs that produce meanings, just as visual elements are signs. • For example the creaking of a door can create suspense and fear.
  • 6. MUSIC • A soundtrack creates mood and strengthens meaning. Music is usually not noticed, but still contributes to the intended meaning of the film. • Voice – over: voice overs are added at the postproduction stage and are typically used to anchor meaning and give guidance to the audience. They can also be used to create sympathy for the characters or present their point of view.
  • 7. PARALLEL AND CONTRAPUNTAL SOUND • Parallel Sound: Usually the sound we hear on the screen is the appropriate sound we expect to hear. The music in Psycho reflects the violence in the film. • Contrapuntal Sound: When the sound works against what we see on the screen. For example in Goodfellas, horrific acts of violence are accompanied by bright, happy, energetic music rather than sinister threatening music.
  • 8. SOUND BRIDGES • This device is used fairly often for linking two scenes together. • This technique, is often used to help smooth over the edit point between two shots.

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