Honors Biology: Populations

  • 1,436 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,436
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6. Fig. 53-4a (a) Clumped
  • 7. Fig. 53-4b (b) Uniform
  • 8. Fig. 53-4c (c) Random
  • 9. Concept Check
    • One Species of forest bird is highly territorial, while a second lives in flocks. What is each species’ likely pattern of dispersion? Explain
  • 10. Fig. 53-3 Births Births and immigration add individuals to a population. Immigration Deaths and emigration remove individuals from a population. Deaths Emigration
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14. Concept Check
    • Each female of a particular fish species produces millions of eggs per year. What is the likely survivorship pattern? Explain.
  • 15.  
  • 16. Semelparity or Iteroparity
  • 17. Concept Check
    • Consider two rivers. One is spring fed and is constant in water volume and temperature year-round; the other drains a desert landscape and floods and dries out as unpredictable intervals. Which is more likely to support many species of iteroparous animals? Why?
  • 18. Evolution and Life History Diversity
    • Life histories are very diverse
    • Species that exhibit semelparity , or big-bang reproduction , reproduce once and die
    • Species that exhibit iteroparity , or repeated reproduction , produce offspring repeatedly
    • Highly variable or unpredictable environments likely favor big-bang reproduction, while dependable environments may favor repeated reproduction
  • 19. Resource Partioning
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22. Concept Check
    • Where is exponential growth by a plant population more likely – one a newly formed volcanic island or in a mature, undisturbed rain forest? Why?
  • 23.  
  • 24.                                
  • 25. Fig. 53-13b Number of Daphnia /50 mL 0 30 60 90 180 150 120 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Time (days) (b) A Daphnia population in the lab
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29. Concept Check
    • Indentify three density-dependent factors that limit population size, and explain how each exerts negative feedback.
  • 30. Metapopulaiton
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35. Fig. 53-22 8000 B.C.E. 4000 B.C.E. 3000 B.C.E. 2000 B.C.E. 1000 B.C.E. 0 1000 C.E. 2000 C.E. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Plague Human population (billions) 7
  • 36.  
  • 37. Fig. 53-23 2005 Projected data Annual percent increase Year 1950 1975 2000 2025 2050 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0
  • 38. Fig. 53-24 1750 1800 1900 1950 2000 2050 Year 1850 Sweden Mexico Birth rate Birth rate Death rate Death rate 0 10 20 30 40 50 Birth or death rate per 1,000 people
  • 39. Concept Check
    • During the demographic transition from high birth and death rates to low birth and death rates, countries usually undergo rapid population growth. Explain why.
  • 40. Fig. 53-25 Rapid growth Afghanistan Male Female Age Age Male Female Slow growth United States Male Female No growth Italy 85+ 80–84 75–79 70–74 60–64 65–69 55–59 50–54 45–49 40–44 35–39 30–34 25–29 20–24 15–19 0–4 5–9 10–14 85+ 80–84 75–79 70–74 60–64 65–69 55–59 50–54 45–49 40–44 35–39 30–34 25–29 20–24 15–19 0–4 5–9 10–14 10  10  8 8 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 Percent of population Percent of population Percent of population 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 8 8 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 8 8
  • 41.  
  • 42.  
  • 43. Fig. 53-27 Log (g carbon/year) 13.4 9.8 5.8 Not analyzed