Honors Biology: Populations

1,897 views
1,621 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,897
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
19
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Honors Biology: Populations

    1. 6. Fig. 53-4a (a) Clumped
    2. 7. Fig. 53-4b (b) Uniform
    3. 8. Fig. 53-4c (c) Random
    4. 9. Concept Check <ul><li>One Species of forest bird is highly territorial, while a second lives in flocks. What is each species’ likely pattern of dispersion? Explain </li></ul>
    5. 10. Fig. 53-3 Births Births and immigration add individuals to a population. Immigration Deaths and emigration remove individuals from a population. Deaths Emigration
    6. 14. Concept Check <ul><li>Each female of a particular fish species produces millions of eggs per year. What is the likely survivorship pattern? Explain. </li></ul>
    7. 16. Semelparity or Iteroparity
    8. 17. Concept Check <ul><li>Consider two rivers. One is spring fed and is constant in water volume and temperature year-round; the other drains a desert landscape and floods and dries out as unpredictable intervals. Which is more likely to support many species of iteroparous animals? Why? </li></ul>
    9. 18. Evolution and Life History Diversity <ul><li>Life histories are very diverse </li></ul><ul><li>Species that exhibit semelparity , or big-bang reproduction , reproduce once and die </li></ul><ul><li>Species that exhibit iteroparity , or repeated reproduction , produce offspring repeatedly </li></ul><ul><li>Highly variable or unpredictable environments likely favor big-bang reproduction, while dependable environments may favor repeated reproduction </li></ul>
    10. 19. Resource Partioning
    11. 22. Concept Check <ul><li>Where is exponential growth by a plant population more likely – one a newly formed volcanic island or in a mature, undisturbed rain forest? Why? </li></ul>
    12. 24.                                
    13. 25. Fig. 53-13b Number of Daphnia /50 mL 0 30 60 90 180 150 120 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Time (days) (b) A Daphnia population in the lab
    14. 29. Concept Check <ul><li>Indentify three density-dependent factors that limit population size, and explain how each exerts negative feedback. </li></ul>
    15. 30. Metapopulaiton
    16. 35. Fig. 53-22 8000 B.C.E. 4000 B.C.E. 3000 B.C.E. 2000 B.C.E. 1000 B.C.E. 0 1000 C.E. 2000 C.E. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Plague Human population (billions) 7
    17. 37. Fig. 53-23 2005 Projected data Annual percent increase Year 1950 1975 2000 2025 2050 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0
    18. 38. Fig. 53-24 1750 1800 1900 1950 2000 2050 Year 1850 Sweden Mexico Birth rate Birth rate Death rate Death rate 0 10 20 30 40 50 Birth or death rate per 1,000 people
    19. 39. Concept Check <ul><li>During the demographic transition from high birth and death rates to low birth and death rates, countries usually undergo rapid population growth. Explain why. </li></ul>
    20. 40. Fig. 53-25 Rapid growth Afghanistan Male Female Age Age Male Female Slow growth United States Male Female No growth Italy 85+ 80–84 75–79 70–74 60–64 65–69 55–59 50–54 45–49 40–44 35–39 30–34 25–29 20–24 15–19 0–4 5–9 10–14 85+ 80–84 75–79 70–74 60–64 65–69 55–59 50–54 45–49 40–44 35–39 30–34 25–29 20–24 15–19 0–4 5–9 10–14 10  10  8 8 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 Percent of population Percent of population Percent of population 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 8 8 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 8 8
    21. 43. Fig. 53-27 Log (g carbon/year) 13.4 9.8 5.8 Not analyzed

    ×