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Honors Biology - Evolution
 

Honors Biology - Evolution

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    Honors Biology - Evolution Honors Biology - Evolution Presentation Transcript

    • Evolution
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    • Fig. 22-7
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    • Descent with modifications
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      • Organisms evolve in order to better suit an environment. Evolution involves mutations in the genetic information of organisms that lead to changes in the appearance or phenotype of organisms. Factors from the environment that influence survival, such as availability of food, water and shelter, generate random mutations in organisms. Many mutations are neutral; they have no effect on the organism’s phenotype. Some mutations are detrimental and make the organism less likely to survive. If an organism develops a detrimental mutation, it will not have offspring and so the detrimental mutation will not be passed down. If an organism has a beneficial mutation, its offspring will have that beneficial mutation and will be better able to survive and reproduce. This process of random mutation and selection from the environment insures that organisms advance to more and more complex levels of biological structure.
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    • Fig. 22-18 Human embryo Chick embryo (LM) Pharyngeal pouches Post-anal tail
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    • Fig. 22-19 Hawks and other birds Ostriches Crocodiles Lizards and snakes Amphibians Mammals Lungfishes Tetrapod limbs Amnion Feathers Homologous characteristic Branch point (common ancestor) Tetrapods Amniotes Birds 6 5 4 3 2 1
    • Convergent Evolution
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    • Human Evolution
    • Two Opposing Theories
      • Multiregional Theory
        • Parallel evolution
      • Displacement Theory
        • Out of Africa theory
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/
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    • Synthetic Theory
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    • Molecular Clocks
    • Endosymbiotic Theory
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    • http://www.geneticorigins.org
    • Molecular Clock
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    • Dr. Svante Pääbo, Director of the Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute.
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    • Two Factors Effecting Haplotypes
      • Evolution.
      • Genetic Drift.
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    • Genetic Drift
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    • Ms. Famili Mr. Edgar
    • Famili Edgar
    • My mtDNA Haplotype
    • Haplogroup HV*
    • Ms. Famili’s mtDNA Haplotype
    • Haplogroup U U5 U6
    • Mt. Toba
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    • Evolution of Populations
    • Fig. 23-5 Porcupine herd Porcupine herd range Beaufort Sea NORTHWEST TERRITORIES MAP AREA ALASKA CANADA Fortymile herd range Fortymile herd ALASKA YUKON
    • Fig. 23-6 Frequencies of alleles Alleles in the population Gametes produced Each egg: Each sperm: 80% chance 80% chance 20% chance 20% chance q = frequency of p = frequency of C R allele = 0.8 C W allele = 0.2
    • No mutations
    • Random mating
    • No natural selection
    • Extremely Large Populations
    • No gene flow
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    • Fig. 23-9 Original population Bottlenecking event Surviving population
    • Fig. 23-10a Range of greater prairie chicken Pre-bottleneck (Illinois, 1820) Post-bottleneck (Illinois, 1993) (a)
    • Fig. 23-10b Number of alleles per locus Minnesota, 1998     (no bottleneck) Nebraska, 1998     (no bottleneck) Kansas, 1998     (no bottleneck) Illinois 1930–1960s 1993 Location Population size Percentage of eggs hatched 1,000–25,000 <50 750,000 75,000– 200,000 4,000 5.2 3.7 93 <50 5.8 5.8 5.3 85 96 99 (b)
    • Genetic Drift
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    • Fig. 24-2 (a) Similarity between different species (b) Diversity within a species
    • Genographic Project
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    • SNP For each individual they analysed half a million SNPs, and then amalgamated the results mathematically to produce two numbers representing that person. This allowed each individual's genome to be shown as a point on a two-dimensional plot: the bigger the differences in the genomes, the greater the distance between them on the plot.
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    • Reproductive Isolation
    • Habitat Isolation
    • Temporal Isolation
    • Behavioral Isolation
    • Mechanical Isolation
    • Gametic Isolation
    • Reduced Hybrid Viability
    • Reduced Hybrid Fertility + =
    • Hybrid Breakdown
    • Fig. 24-4 Prezygotic barriers Habitat Isolation Individuals of different species Temporal Isolation Behavioral Isolation Mating attempt Mechanical Isolation Gametic Isolation Fertilization Reduced Hybrid Viability Reduced Hybrid Fertility Postzygotic barriers Hybrid Breakdown Viable, fertile offspring (a) (b) (d) (c) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (l) (k)
    • Fig. 24-5 (a) Allopatric speciation (b) Sympatric speciation
    • Fig. 24-14-1 Gene flow Population (five individuals are shown) Barrier to gene flow
    • Fig. 24-14-2 Gene flow Population (five individuals are shown) Barrier to gene flow Isolated population diverges
    • Fig. 24-14-3 Gene flow Population (five individuals are shown) Barrier to gene flow Isolated population diverges Hybrid zone Hybrid
    • Fig. 24-14-4 Gene flow Population (five individuals are shown) Barrier to gene flow Isolated population diverges Hybrid zone Hybrid Possible outcomes: Reinforcement OR OR Fusion Stability
    • Breakdown of Reproductive Barriers