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Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma
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Acs0701 Initial Management Of Life Threatening Trauma

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  • 1. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 1 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE- THREATENING TRAUMA Frederick A. Moore, M.D., F.A.C.S., and Ernest E. Moore, M.D., F.A.C.S. Initial Approach to the Critically Injured Patient Salvage of the critically injured patient is optimized by a coordi- all injured patients. When it is geographically and logistically fea- nated team effort in an organized trauma system. Management of sible, critically injured patients should be taken directly to a des- life-threatening trauma must be prioritized according to physio- ignated level I trauma center or to a level II trauma center if a logic necessity for survival—that is, active efforts to support air- level I trauma center is more than 30 minutes away.The current- way, breathing, and circulation (the ABCs) are usually initiated ly available field trauma scores, however, are not entirely reliable before specific diagnoses are made. In this chapter, we outline a for identifying critically injured patients8: to capture a sizable systematic approach to severely injured patients within the so- majority of patients with life-threatening injuries, a 50% over- called golden hour.The discussion is divided into prehospital care triage is probably necessary. Advance transmission of key patient and emergency department management; the ED component is information to the receiving trauma center facilitates the organi- further divided into (1) primary survey with initial resuscitation, zation of the trauma team and ensures the availability of ancillary (2) evaluation and continued resuscitation, and (3) secondary sur- services.9 vey with definitive diagnosis and triage. DECLARATION OF DEATH AT SCENE The determination that care is futile during prehospital evalu- Prehospital Care ation is best made on the basis of the cardiac rhythm. Asystole jus- tifies declaration of death at the scene, and recent profound INTERVENTION AT bradycardia (heart rate < 40 beats/min) has been shown to signal INJURY SITE an unsalvageable situation.10-12 Resuscitation and eval- uation of the trauma pa- tient begins at the injury Emergency Department site. The goal is to get the Management right patient to the right hos- ARRIVAL AT HOSPITAL pital at the right time for definitive care. First responders (typical- UNDER ACTIVE ly, firefighters and police) provide rapid basic trauma life support CARDIOPULMONARY (BTLS) and are followed by paramedics and flight nurses with RESUSCITATION advanced trauma life support (ATLS) skills. Medical control is ensured by preestablished field protocols, radio communication Prehospital pulseless with a physician at the base hospital, and subsequent trip audits. electrical activity (PEA) Management priorities of BTLS on the scene are (1) to assess in injured patients has a dismal prognosis, and it has been pro- and control the scene for the safety of the patient and the prehos- posed that such patients should be declared dead in the field.13 pital care providers, (2) to tamponade external hemorrhage with Unfortunately, most first responders do not use the cardiac direct pressure, (3) to protect the spine after blunt trauma, (4) to rhythm to decide whether to initiate CPR.When a patient arrives clear the airway of obstruction and provide supplemental inspired in the ED after prehospital CPR has been initiated, the critical oxygen, (5) to extricate the patient, and (6) to stabilize long-bone question is whether to perform a resuscitative thoracotomy. The fractures.Whereas the benefits of BTLS are undisputed, the mer- prognosis for blunt trauma patients is poor because the major its of the more advanced interventions remain controversial.1,2 causes of cardiopulmonary arrest after blunt trauma (e.g., mas- Airway access, once considered a major asset of the care provided sive brain injury, high spinal cord injury, and exsanguination by paramedics and flight nurses, has now been questioned, not from multiple injuries) are difficult to reverse. In contrast, pa- only because missed tracheal intubation is a concern but also tients with stab wounds to the heart are frequently salvageable if because unintentional hyperventilation (hypocarbia) is detrimen- cardiac arrest occurs because of cardiac tamponade. In most tal in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and during car- cases, the heart can be resuscitated by simply decompressing the diopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).3-5 Moreover, the value of I.V. pericardium, given that blood volume is usually maintained. fluid administration remains controversial.6,7 Guidelines for terminating resuscitation are based on the mech- anism of injury, the duration of CPR, the presence of signs of life FIELD TRIAGE (e.g., pupillary response, respiratory effort, or motor activity), Prehospital trauma scores have been devised to identify criti- and the presence of asystole documented by cardiac monitoring cally injured trauma victims, who represent about 10% to 15% of [see Table 1].14
  • 2. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 2 Communicate with base hospital Field triage: Level I, II, or III facility Assemble trauma team: • Trauma surgeon • Radiology technicians • ED physician • Nurses Initial Approach to the • Surgical specialist • Respiratory technicians Ensure ancillary services: Critically Injured Patient • OR • Blood bank • CT scanning • Interventional radiology Hemodynamic stability is restored Cardiogenic shock Tension Myocardial contusion Pericardial Air embolism pneumothorax tamponade Chest trauma Monitor with ECG. Prevent Place chest tube. hypoxia. Provide pharmacologic cardiac support. Arrest is not Impending Hemodynamic stability is restored imminent cardiac arrest Perform pericardiocentesis. Secondary survey (perform systematic assessment) Arrest is not imminent Question EMT/flight nurse. Obtain medical history. Conduct Place chest tube. rapid, systematic physical exam. Assess potential sites of Criteria for operation: ongoing blood loss by means of abdominal Patient Shock persists • Continued shock ultrasonography, chest x-ray, and pelvic x-ray. Initiate flow stabilizes • Continued bleeding sheet and treatment: (250 ml/hr for 3 hr) • Ensure adequate ventilation. • Insert NG tube and Foley catheter. • Monitor core T° . • Give tetanus prophylaxis. • Splint long bone fractures. • Give systemic antibiotics for specific indications only. • Obtain CBC, urinalysis, and ECG. • Type and crossmatch. Perform ED thoracotomy. • Measure arterial blood gases for significant chest injuries and evidence of occult shock. Obtain radiologic studies as needed to assess occult injuries and clarify indications for operation. Transport to SICU.
  • 3. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 3 Initiate resuscitation and evaluation of trauma patients at the injury scene; communicate with base hospital Management priorities of basic trauma life support are the following: • Assess and control the accident scene • Protect the spine after blunt trauma • Supplement inspired O2 • Tamponade external hemorrhage with direct pressure • Extricate the patient • Stabilize long bone fractures Advanced trauma life support may include the following: • Active airway support • I.V. fluid administration • Decompression of thorax for suspected pneumothorax < 3 Minutes Primary survey (evaluate and initiate management of airway, breathing, and circulation) Listen to prehospital report. Airway: Clear airway and establish patency; obtain cervical spine x-ray. Breathing: Assist ventilation; vent suspected hemopneumothoraces with chest tubes. Circulation: Establish I.V. access; infuse fluid (crystalloid); draw blood samples. Assess chest and abdomen with ultrasonography. Blunt trauma: obtain x-rays of cervical spine, chest, and pelvis. < 5 Minutes Evaluate response to initial resuscitation Assess response to crystalloid infusion (i.e., BP, heart rate, respiratory rate, mental status). Identify easily reversible causes of shock. Shock persists Secondary survey: Reassess physical signs. Monitor CVP. Unstable patients: 5 minutes Repeat ultrasonography; consider DPL if ultrasonography is equivocal. (Stable patients: up to 30 minutes) Hypovolemic shock Neurogenic shock [See 8:3 Shock.] Abdominal trauma Pelvic fracture Compress with sheet or C-clamp; administer blood. Impending Multisystem Isolated injury cardiac arrest trauma Hemodynamic stability Shock persists is restored Perform ultrasonography Consider pelvic fixation or open DPL. (consult orthopedic surgeon). Abdominal Abdominal ultrasonography ultrasonography is positive is equivocal Perform DPL. Ultrasonogram or DPL is positive by red DPL is grossly cell count or negative positive DPL is DPL is Perform ED thoracotomy. positive Perform angiography and negative percutaneous embolization, depending on fracture geography. If DPL was negative, transport to ICU. If DPL was positive, evalute by CT scan. Transport to OR. < 30 Minutes
  • 4. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 4 Table 1 Guidelines for Declaring Patients must be considered before correct definitive triage is possible.The Dead on Arrival clinician must rapidly formulate a differential diagnosis and then sequentially initiate the appropriate diagnostic tests. Prehospital CPR for > 15 min with no signs of life Penetrating trauma Airway and Breathing Asystole without wound that could cause pericar- dial tamponade After blunt trauma, airway control should proceed on the Prehospital CPR for > 5 min with no signs of life assumption that an unstable cervical spine fracture exists; thus, Blunt trauma Asystole hyperextension of the neck must be avoided. Airway management in the seriously injured victim can usually be accomplished with simple techniques, but it is occasionally challenging. Evaluation PRIMARY SURVEY AND INITIAL RESUSCITATION begins by asking the patient a question such as “How are you?” A During initial assessment, an empirical sequence of lifesaving response given in a normal voice indicates that the airway is not therapeutic and diagnostic procedures is pursued. The ultimate in immediate jeopardy; a breathless, hoarse response or no goal is to establish adequate oxygen delivery to the vital organs. response at all indicates that the airway may be compromised. This is accomplished by first progressing through the ABCs: air- Airway obstruction and hypoventilation are the most likely way control with cervical spine precautions, assisted breathing causes of respiratory failure.The critical decision is whether active with ventilation, and empirical tube thoracostomy to relieve a airway intervention is needed. The first maneuver is to clear the pneumothorax if indicated. These maneuvers are carried out to airway of debris and to suction secretions. In the obtunded maximize oxygen delivery to the alveoli. Support of the circulation patient, this procedure is followed by elevation of the angle of the (tamponade of external bleeding and fluid administration) is insti- mandible to alleviate pharyngeal obstruction and placement of an tuted to restore effective blood volume, thereby enhancing oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal tube to maintain airway paten- myocardial performance and thus oxygen delivery to the tissues. cy. Supplemental oxygen is given via a nasal cannula (6 L/min) or Unstable patients fall into two categories: those who respond to a nonrebreathing oxygen mask (12 L/min). Airway patency, how- initial intervention and those who do not. Early nonresponders ever, does not ensure adequate ventilation, nor does a normal are challenging because they require an immediate lifesaving arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) on pulse oximetry. Clinical evi- intervention.The challenge is to perform the correct intervention dence of hypoventilation includes poor air exchange at the nose before the patient dies. Patients who respond to initial interven- and mouth, diminished breath sounds, and decreased chest wall tions can be equally challenging because a subset of them have excursion; the most likely causes are head injury, spinal cord tran- only a finite time window before shock recurs. Multiple diagnoses section, hemopneumothorax, flail chest, and profound shock. Figure 1 Technique for cricothyrotomy is illustrated here. The larynx is stabilized with one hand, and a 2 cm vertical incision is made over the cricothyroid space. The cricothyroid membrane is palpated and incised horizontally. A Trousseau dilator is inserted and spread vertically for visualization of the subglottic space (left). A tracheal hook is used to retract the inferior border of the thyroid cartilage as a tracheostomy tube with a 6 mm internal diameter is inserted into the trachea (right).
  • 5. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 5 diameter) cuffed endotracheal tube is inserted to a distance of 23 Table 2 10 Steps in Rapid-Sequence cm from the incisors. In children, tube size is gauged to equal the diameter of the little finger. The proper depth (in centimeters) to Intubation which the tube should be inserted can be estimated by multiply- 1. Preparation of equipment and supplies ing the tube’s internal diameter (in millimeters) by 3. A chest x- 2. Preoxygenation ray should be obtained as soon as possible to rule out the possi- 3. Sedation to decrease anxiety bility of right mainstem intubation. 4. Premedication to mitigate adverse effects: vecuronium bromide Intubated patients should be placed on a high fraction of (1 mg) to prevent defasciculations, lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg) to prevent inspired oxygen (FIO2), and their SaO2 should be monitored by increased ICP with TBI means of pulse oximetry. Generally, a low SaO2 is easily treated by 5. Cricoid pressure increasing the FIO2. Patients who do not respond when the FIO2 is 6. Administration of paralytic agent: succinylcholine (1.0–1.5 mg/kg), increased to 100% should be treated with low levels of positive vecuronium bromide (0.6–1.2 mg/kg) if succinylcholine contraindicated end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) once adequate volume status is 7. Intubation assured. Positive-pressure ventilation impedes return of blood to 8. Confirmation of tube position by auscultation and capnography the heart; as a result, emergency intubation of a hypovolemic 9. Securing of airway patient can adversely affect cardiac output. Hyperventilation 10. Chest x-ray should be avoided. An ABG analysis should be obtained to assess pH and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). ICP—intracranial pressure TBI—traumatic brain injury Circulation Once alveolar ventilation is ensured, the next priority is to opti- Suspected hemopneumothoraces should be vented with large- mize oxygen delivery by maximizing cardiovascular performance. bore chest tubes inserted via the midlateral thorax. External hemorrhage is controlled by means of manual compres- Cervical spine protection is integral to airway management but sion, and empirical volume loading for presumed hypovolemia via should not be allowed to delay necessary intervention.The major- large-bore I.V. cannulas is initiated.The size, number, and sites of ity of significant spinal injuries in adults arriving alive at the ED are I.V. catheters depend on the degree of shock present and on esti- at the C5 to C7 levels. In children 8 years old or younger, the most mates of injury severity. If the patient arrives in shock or has obvi- frequent site of spinal injury is between the occiput and the C3 ous multiple injuries, a short 14 French catheter should be placed level. Significant spinal cord injury without radiographic abnor- in each antecubital vein. When vascular collapse precludes malities (i.e., the SCIWORA syndrome) is a relatively rare event peripheral percutaneous access in an adult, the alternative is can- (0.5% of patients undergoing radiography), and the data on its rel- nulation of the femoral or the subclavian vein by means of the ative frequency in children and in adults are conflicting.15,16 A frac- Seldinger technique. We have found the supraclavicular subcla- tured cervical spine is usually tender to direct palpation in alert vian approach to be useful in the ED.23 Venous access should be patients, but pain may be masked by distracting injuries.17,18 Even avoided in regions with potential penetrating vascular injuries good-quality cross-table lateral cervical spine films may not detect (e.g., lower neck, upper chest, pelvis, or groin). 15% of unstable fractures. Accordingly, in high-risk patients, a cer- Intraosseous infusion through a cannula placed in the vical collar is left in place until the cervical spine has been radio- medullary cavity of a long bone is a safe and efficacious method logically evaluated for bony and ligamentous integrity.19 for emergency vascular access in infants and children younger Bag-mask ventilation is an effective temporizing measure, but it than 6 years. This procedure is typically performed in the antero- consumes the attention of a skilled trauma team member, it may medial aspect of the tibial plateau in an uninjured extremity; the insufflate air into the stomach, and it can be resisted by sponta- distal femur, the distal tibia, and the sternum are other potential neously breathing patients. It is also ineffective in the presence of sites. Intraosseous infusion generally allows administration of suf- severe maxillofacial trauma.The decision for urgent airway control ficient fluid to facilitate subsequent cannulation of the venous cir- is made on clinical grounds; there often is no time to obtain a con- culation.24 If access remains problematic in children, greater firmatory arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis.20 Persistent airway saphenous vein cutdown at the groin is the preferred route obstruction or signs of inadequate ventilation mandate prompt because inadvertent femoral artery injury with the percutaneous intervention. Patients with expanding neck hematomas, deterio- approach may result in limb-threatening vasospasm. rating vital signs, or severe head trauma are also best managed With establishment of the first I.V. line, blood should be drawn with an aggressive airway approach. On the other hand, in equiv- for hematocrit, white blood cell (WBC) count, electrolyte con- ocal situations, an ABG analysis may be decisive. centrations, blood-group typing, coagulation profile, and toxicol- The best method of airway control depends on (1) the presence ogy screen as indicated. of maxillofacial trauma, (2) possible cervical spine injury, (3) Isotonic crystalloid is used for initial resuscitation in the overall patient condition, and (4) the experience of the physician. ED.25,26 Lactated Ringer solution (LR) is preferred to normal Patients in respiratory distress with severe maxillofacial trauma saline (NS) unless the patient has an obvious brain injury. warrant operative intervention. Cricothyrotomy is the preferred Excessive early administration of crystalloids has been identified approach in adults and has virtually replaced tracheostomy in the as a risk factor for adverse outcomes; accordingly, the amount ED [see Figure 1]; the rare exceptions are in patients with major infused should be closely monitored.27 If the patient does not laryngeal trauma or extensive tracheal disruption. Percutaneous respond to crystalloid infusion at levels exceeding 30 ml/kg, blood transtracheal ventilation may be safer than both of these surgical should be administered. LR and banked blood should not be procedures for temporary airway management, particularly in infused through the same I.V. line. children. In all other patients, the current standard approach is Early empirical blood transfusions are indicated in patients who rapid sequence intubation (RSI) of the trachea orally with inline arrive in severe shock or who have injuries associated with signifi- immobilization [see Table 2].21,22 In adults, a large (8 mm internal cant bleeding (e.g., a vertical shear pelvic fracture or bilateral
  • 6. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 6 femur fractures), especially if the patients are elderly. Type-specif- ic blood should be available within 20 minutes. If type-specific blood is not available, reconstituted O-negative packed red blood cells (RBCs) may be used. Micropore filters are not used in blood infusion lines in hemodynamically unstable patients, because they impede infusion capabilities.28 In the future, hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers may become available, obviating crossmatching. Protocols for massive transfusions should be established with the blood bank to ensure prompt availability of blood products for patients arriving with life-threatening bleeding.29,30 EVALUATION AND CON- TINUED RESUSCITATION Identification of Hemodynamic Instability Recognizing the pres- ence of shock and assess- ing its severity [see 8:3 Shock] are key factors in early decision making. During the initial ABCs, palpation for the presence of pulses can be used to gener- ate an estimate of systolic blood pressure (SBP). In general, a radi- al pulse is detected when SBP is higher than 80 mm Hg, a femoral pulse when SBP is above 70 mm Hg, and a carotid pulse when SBP exceeds 60 mm Hg.The initial blood pressure measurement should be made with a manual cuff; automatic cuff BP measure- ment machines may overestimate SBP in hypovolemic trauma patients.31 An SBP lower than 90 mm Hg (or an age-adjusted decrease in SBP that exceeds 30 mm Hg) in conjunction with a heart rate higher than 120 beats/min is generally considered indicative of shock. Most patients, however, especially young ones, can compensate for hypovolemia and maintain a normal BP even in the face of significant ongoing hemorrhage. It should be kept in mind that because acute massive blood loss may paradox- ically trigger a vagal-mediated bradycardia, the traditional inverse correlation between increased HR and reduced effective blood volume may not hold in the early resuscitation period.32 The ini- tial hemoglobin level is notoriously misleading, whether because the patient has not yet been volume loaded or because there has not been sufficient time for influx of interstitial fluid into the intravascular space. It may therefore be helpful to measure the hemoglobin level again after initial volume loading for purposes of comparison; a decrease greater than 2 g/dl should be grounds for concern. The size of the base deficit can be a useful measure of the depth of hemorrhagic shock.33 Whether the base deficit is persisting or declining is more important than its absolute value, but generally a base deficit smaller than –8 mEq/L is indicative of severe shock. Figure 2 In acute trauma, a tube thoracostomy is performed through the fourth or fifth interspace at the midaxillary line, well above the diaphragm (a). A short subcutaneous tunnel is fash- ioned over the superior edge of the rib, and the overlying fascia and intercostal muscle are divided sharply. The pleural space is entered by incising the intercostal muscle and the pleura with a heavy scissors (b). A gloved finger is then inserted to confirm penetration of the thoracic cavity and to free up intrapleural adhesions (c). A large-bore tube (36 French) is directed posterior- ly toward the pleural apex; the proximal port must be well inside the chest (d). The tube is then secured to the chest wall with No. 5 braided polyethylene suture and connected to a standard collec- tion apparatus.
  • 7. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 7 Measurement of central venous pressure (CVP) is helpful in iden- tifying severe hypovolemia, and serial CVP measurements can be used to assess response to volume loading. Although arterial lines are of limited value in initial ED management, they become increasingly useful as time passes. The end points of initial resus- citation during the time of critical diagnostic testing and triage are as follows: (1) SBP higher than 90 mm Hg, (2) HR lower than 120 beats/min, (3) hemoglobin concentration equal to or greater than 10 g/dl, and (4) CVP equal to or greater than 10 cm H2O. Management of Nonresponsive Unstable Patients Shock that persists despite initial volume loading may derive from severe hypovolemia, car- diogenic causes, or neuro- genic causes. Given that neurogenic shock is fairly well tolerated, the key concern at this point is to quickly distinguish hypovolemic shock from cardio- genic shock because cardiogenic shock may necessitate immedi- ate ED intervention. This distinction can reasonably be made by measuring CVP. In hypovolemic shock, CVP is generally less than 5 mm Hg, whereas in clinically significant cardiogenic shock, CVP usually exceeds 20 mm Hg. The differential diagnosis of traumatic cardiogenic shock depends on the mechanism of injury and may include (1) tension pneumothorax, (2) pericardial tamponade, (3) myocardial contu- sion, and (4) air embolism. Except in refractory shock, telltale physical signs are frequently hard to discern in a noisy ED, espe- cially when compounded by persistent hypovolemia.Timely diag- nosis requires a high index of suspicion. Tension pneumothorax, the most common cause of cardiogenic shock in both blunt and penetrating trauma, is often first confirmed with emergency chest tube placement [see Figure 2]. In traumatic pericardial tamponade, the classic components of Beck’s triad (hypotension, muffled heart sounds, and jugular venous distention) are frequently absent, and pulsus paradoxus is rarely detectable. ED ultrasonography is the first test employed by trauma surgeons in patients with high-risk penetrating wounds.34 CVP measurements and pericardiocentesis [see Figure 3] are help- ful confirmative tests. Occasionally, a blunt trauma patient can be salvaged through timely diagnosis of a blunt atrial tear. Figure 3 For pericardiocentesis, an 18-gauge spinal needle is Myocardial contusion should be suspected in any blunt trauma inserted at the left xiphoid-costal junction and inserted toward patient with unexplained cardiogenic shock or persistent arrhyth- the inferior tip of the left scapula (angled 45° to the patient’s mia. Electrocardiographic changes are usually nonspecific.35,36 right and 45° from the chest wall). The needle is advanced until blood or air is encountered; a “pop” may be appreciated as the Fundamental measures include correction of acidosis, hypoxia, needle tip traverses the pericardium. If air is withdrawn, the and electrolyte abnormalities; judicious administration of fluid; needle tip should be directed more toward the patient’s midline. and pharmacologic suppression of life-threatening arrhythmias. If blood is withdrawn, 50 ml should be aspirated and injected Bronchovenous air embolism into the left atrium from a pul- onto a sheet so that it can be inspected for clots. As a rule, intra- monary laceration typically occurs after penetrating trauma and ventricular blood will clot, whereas defibrinated pericardial probably is more common than is generally recognized.37 blood will not clot. Hemodynamic instability develops after positive pressure ventila- tion is initiated, as air is forced from the pulmonary bronchioles nent cardiac arrest [see Figure 4].38 The physiologic rationale is to into the adjacent open pulmonary veins and, ultimately, into the minimize the duration of profound shock. ED thoracotomy per- coronary arteries. ED thoracotomy is essential for pulmonary mits (1) release of pericardial tamponade, (2) control of intratho- hilar cross-clamping, air aspiration from the left ventricle, and car- racic blood loss, (3) internal cardiac massage, and (4) cross- diac massage.The patient is then transferred to the OR for defin- clamping of the descending thoracic aorta to enhance coronary itive management of the pulmonary lesion before the hilar clamp and cerebral perfusion and to reduce subdiaphragmatic bleeding. is released. Internal cardiac massage should be done bimanually; otherwise, a ED thoracotomy is an integral part of the initial management forceful thumb may rupture the relatively thin right ventricle as it of the patient who arrives in extremis and deteriorates to immi- becomes distended.Ventricular lacerations are repaired with pled-
  • 8. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 8 geted horizontal mattress sutures, whereas atrial injuries are con- ry shock with a central abdominal gunshot wound, for example, trolled with a partially occluding vascular clamp and repaired with clearly should be transported to the OR in a matter of minutes, a continuous suture [see Figure 5]. Small left ventricular wounds but the management of a previously unstable victim of a motor can be closed without pledgets. For large left ventricular wounds, vehicle crash who has a positive ultrasonogram combined with skin staples are an alternative means of rapid closure. altered mental status, a widened mediastinum on chest x-ray, and an unstable pelvic fracture requires a far more complex decision. SECONDARY SURVEY In general, however, when priorities conflict, the safest arena for WITH DEFINITIVE DIAG- managing critically injured patients is the OR. NOSIS AND TRIAGE DECI- SIONS Penetrating Trauma Fortunately, most acute- Systematic assessment The secondary survey is more ly injured patients arriving focused in cases of penetrating trauma than in cases of blunt trau- in shock can be rendered ma. The priorities are (1) to identify all of the wounds, (2) to hemodynamically stable decide whether an urgent operation is indicated, and (3) to deter- enough to undergo a sec- mine whether additional testing is needed to assist with intraop- ondary survey. Diagnosis and treatment proceed simultaneously. erative management. The decision-making process is driven by Prioritization is imperative and is governed by the severity of shock hemodynamic stability and the location of the wounds. Efforts and its rate of progression. Easily correctable life-threatening should focus not on resuscitating the patient until vital signs are injuries should be addressed first before a search is made for normal but, rather, on obtaining adequate I.V. access, ensuring occult trauma. Prioritization is also guided by the mechanism of that blood products are available, and notifying the OR. He- injury. Penetrating trauma typically results in a localized injury, modynamically unstable patients should be rapidly sent to the OR whereas blunt trauma frequently results in multiple injuries involv- with minimal or no testing. ing several body regions.When hemodynamic instability recurs, its cause must be identified and corrected promptly. Neck Patients who have an obvious life-threatening injury The length of time spent in the ED, the decision for urgent (e.g., a gurgling wound, pulsatile bleeding, or a compromised air- operation, and the ordering of special radiologic studies are criti- way) or are in severe shock should undergo operation promptly. cal decisions that must take into account the mechanism of injury, ED management should be limited to airway control, external the response to resuscitation, and the availability of a staffed oper- compression to control bleeding, I.V. access, and chest x-ray. A ating room or interventional radiology suite. A patient in refracto- neurologic examination should be performed and documented. a b c Figure 4 (a) A left anterolateral thoracotomy is performed through the fifth intercostal space. (b) The lung is reflected superiorly for placement of a Satinsky vascular clamp on the descending thoracic aorta. A pericardiotomy is performed with scissors anterior to the phrenic nerve. (c) A so-called butterfly extension across the sternum creates a bilateral anterolateral thoracotomy, providing access to both thoracic cavities and to the pulmonary hila, the heart, and the proximal great vessels.
  • 9. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 9 Figure 5 (a) A Satinsky vascular clamp is used to control arterial and major vessel injuries while they are closed with a running suture. (b) For wounds close to coronary arteries, horizontal mattress sutures should be used to spare the arteries. (c) Small wounds to the thick left ventricle can be closed with interrupted simple sutures. (d ) Larger wounds should be closed using pledgets; staple closure may be preferred for larger ventricular wounds. Management of hemodynamically stable patients without obvi- graphically documented hemopericardium, and persistent tachy- ous injury is selective.39 Patients with zone I wounds should cardia should undergo pericardiocentesis to relieve any ongoing undergo CT scanning or angiography to rule out occult vascular subendocardial ischemia even if SBP is normal [see Figure 3]. injuries. Alert patients with zone II injuries but without significant Patients who exhibit persistent signs of pericardial tamponade hematoma, crepitance, dysphonia, or dysphagia may be managed despite negative results from ultrasonography or pericardiocente- expectantly. A missed esophageal injury is associated with signif- sis should be transported to the OR for creation of a subxiphoid icant morbidity. If there is reason to suspect such an injury, both pericardial window. In approximately 15% of cases, the results of esophagoscopy and esophagography should be performed. pericardial aspiration for acute hemopericardium are falsely neg- Although individually these tests have false negative rates ranging ative because the blood in the pericardial sac is clotted and can- from 10% to 15%, their combined sensitivity approaches 100%.40 not be aspirated. Asymptomatic patients with zone III injuries should undergo CT If the patient is in extremis, ED thoracotomy should be per- scanning or angiography if there is any suspicion of an occult vas- formed promptly [see Figure 4]. Most patients experiencing cular injury. intrathoracic bleeding without pericardial tamponade stabilize after tube thoracostomy and modest volume loading. Urgent tho- Chest In unstable patients with thoracic injuries, a chest tube racotomy is indicated for (1) so-called caked hemothorax [see should be placed into the wounded hemithorax, followed by a Figure 6], (2) an initial chest tube output higher than 20 ml/kg, (3) chest x-ray to confirm tube placement, lung expansion, hemotho- a persistent output higher than 3 ml/kg/hr for 2 consecutive hours, rax evacuation, and the presence of foreign bodies. If a cardiac or (4) a 12-hour output exceeding 30 ml/kg. Patients with an ini- wound is suspected, ED ultrasonography should be performed.34 tial chest tube output higher than 10 ml/kg should be closely Persistent instability without evidence of intrathoracic bleeding or observed for hemodynamic instability in the ICU. Abrupt cessa- pericardial tamponade should raise the suspicion of intra-abdom- tion of chest tube output may be deceptive; if hypotension persists inal bleeding. Occasionally, a high spinal cord injury contributes or recurs, a second chest tube should be inserted and another to hemodynamic instability. chest x-ray obtained. The challenge in this setting is to quickly identify those patients Patients with large air leaks, massive subcutaneous emphysema, who require an urgent operation. Patients who have wounds close or a persistent pneumothorax should undergo bronchoscopy to to the heart (i.e., in the so-called mediastinal box), ultrasono- exclude a tracheobronchial injury. Patients with transmediastinal
  • 10. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 10 100,000/mm3 mandates laparotomy. Furthermore, an elevated WBC count, amylase level, alkaline phosphatase level, or bilirubin concentration in the lavage fluid may identify hollow viscus injury (HVI); however, threshold values for these measurements have not been established.45,46 Flank, back, and pelvis Unstable patients with injuries to the flank, the back, or the pelvis should undergo immediate laparotomy. Stable patients are difficult to evaluate. With the exception of blood on rectal examination, the findings from phys- ical examination are unreliable. Gross hematuria is indicative of bladder or kidney injury. Triple-contrast CT scanning may be helpful in patients with high-risk wounds.44,47 Most retroperi- toneal HVIs are identified on the basis of extraluminal gas or fluid rather than of contrast extravasation. Sigmoidoscopy should be performed if a rectal injury is suspected. High-risk wounds should be explored to ensure that retroperitoneal HVIs are not missed; delayed diagnosis is associated with significant morbidity. Extremities Unstable patients with isolated penetrating injuries to the extremities should be managed with external com- pression to control bleeding (not with tourniquets or direct vessel Figure 6 ED chest x-ray shows a massive hemothorax. If the clamping), I.V. access with modest volume loading, and prompt chest tube fails to evacuate the blood, this is a so-called caked triage to the OR for exploration and definitive treatment. Manage- hemothorax, which is an indication for emergency thoracotomy in ment of stable patients with penetrating extremity injuries begins the OR. with a search for “hard” signs of arterial injury (e.g., a large, expanding, or pulsatile hematoma; absent distal pulses; a palpable gunshot wounds (GSWs) or penetrating wounds close to the great thrill; an audible bruit; and signs of distal ischemia).48 Presence of vessels should undergo CT angiography, formal angiography, or any of these hard signs prompts further evaluation. If signs of dis- both.41 tal ischemia exist, the patient should be taken to the OR, where an on-table angiogram can be performed. If knowledge of the pa- Lower chest. Wounds located below the nipples anteriorly or tient’s specific vascular anatomy is needed and no signs of the tips of the scapulas posteriorly may penetrate the diaphragm ischemia exist, a formal angiogram is reasonable. If “soft” signs of and cause significant intra-abdominal or retroperitoneal injuries. vascular injury are present, distal blood pressures should be mea- Such penetration occurs in 10% of stab wounds and 30% of sured in the injured extremity, the contralateral extremity, and, GSWs.42 If the patient is unstable, tube thoracostomy, chest x-ray, often, the brachial artery. If either the ratio of the BP in the injured and abdominal ultrasonography are indicated. If instability per- extremity to that in the contralateral extremity or the ratio of the sists, the patient should be transported to the OR. If the patient BP in the injured ankle to that in the brachial artery is 0.90 or stabilizes after tube thoracostomy, additional testing must be higher, arterial injury is excluded and no additional testing is done to exclude associated injuries. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage needed. These ratios are not, however, reliable for excluding arte- (DPL) is a good screening test for intra-abdominal injuries. The rial injuries in the axilla or the groin. The presence of a good RBC threshold for abdominal exploration is lowered to Doppler signal does not exclude a vascular injury. 10,000/mm3 because isolated diaphragmatic injuries may not bleed. An intermediate RBC count (1,000 to 10,000/mm3) war- Blunt Trauma rants further evaluation with thoracoscopy or laparoscopy Systematic assessment The goal is to identify all potential- because DPL may contribute this degree of RBC contamina- ly life- and limb-threatening injuries. A comprehensive assessment tion.43 CT scanning may assist in diagnosing occult retroperi- is crucial to facilitate triage from the ED to the OR, the CT scan- toneal injuries, but it is not reliable for excluding penetrating ning suite, the interventional radiology suite, or the ICU. The diaphragmatic injuries.44 details of the patient’s medical history, as well as the details specif- ically related to the injury, are critical.The prehospital emergency Anterior abdomen Unstable patients should be transport- medical technicians are encouraged to provide a comprehensive ed to the OR with minimal resuscitation and testing. Biplanar account of the event and a thorough patient assessment. A mini- abdominal x-rays are often helpful in clarifying bullet trajectories; mal review of the patient’s medical history should include preex- entrance and exit wounds should be marked with radiopaque isting medical illnesses, current medications (and when they were objects. Intravenous pyelography (IVP) is not indicated, because most recently ingested), allergies, tetanus immunization status, it takes too much time. Management of stable patients depends and the time of the last meal. A rapid, systematic physical exami- on the mechanism of injury. Laparotomy is indicted for GSWs nation is done, literally from head to toe. Patients are completely that violate the peritoneal cavity. DPL or laparoscopy is indicated disrobed and, once spinal injury is excluded, rolled from side to for suspicious tangential GSWs. Laparotomy is indicated in side so that the back and the flanks can be inspected. A rectal patients with overt peritonitis after a stab wound. In other examination is done to look for blood and to evaluate sphincter patients, the stab wound should be explored. If there is no viola- tone; the perineum and the axillae are inspected; and neurologic tion of the anterior fascia, the patient can safely be discharged. If function and peripheral pulses are assessed. the fascia is violated, DPL is indicated; an RBC count higher than The cervical spine is rigidly immobilized, and long-bone frac-
  • 11. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 11 who have been exposed to a cold environment or who require massive volume replacement. A core temperature reading lower than 32° C (89.6° F) should be confirmed with an esophageal probe, and rewarming measures appropriate for the degree of hypothermia should be initiated.50 Tetanus prophylaxis is routine. Systemic antibiotics should be withheld until a specific indication arises. An electrocardiogram is obtained after blunt chest trauma, and an ABG analysis is done in select patients to confirm adequate ventilation and metabolic balance. In any patient with evidence of hypovolemia, a blood sample should be sent for blood-group typ- ing and coagulation studies if urgent blood transfusion is required. Rapid hemorrhage control Blunt trauma patients who arrive in shock and remain hemodynamically unstable pose diffi- cult triage decisions. Initial screening must be directed at identify- ing life-threatening bleeding that necessitates immediate OR inter- vention. Most hospitals do not have an interventional radiology suite immediately available; early notification is crucial in assem- bling the team. At our institutions, after normal working hours, this process consumes about 1 hour. Initial screening focuses on the chest, the abdomen, and the pelvis. A chest x-ray is the most reliable screening test for intratho- racic bleeding; it also confirms the location of endotracheal, naso- gastric, and thoracostomy tubes, as well as that of the central venous catheter. The presence of pleural fluid may be difficult to confirm on a supine chest x-ray: 1 L of blood may produce only a hazy appearance in a hemithorax. Hemothoraces should be drained promptly via tube thoracostomy [see Figure 2]. Continued bleeding must be monitored carefully by measuring chest tube Figure 7 (a) Shown are four transducer positions in the FAST output, obtaining serial chest films to detect retained intrapleural (focused assessment for sonographic evaluation of the trauma blood, and observing vital signs. The criteria used to decide when patient): (1) pericardial area, (2) right upper quadrant, (3) left thoracotomy is indicated are similar to those used in cases of pen- upper quadrant, and (4) pelvis. etrating trauma, but far fewer blunt trauma patients meet these criteria, and intrathoracic bleeding is rarely a reason for immedi- tures are splinted to minimize pain, blood loss, and soft tissue ate OR triage.51 damage. Insertion of a nasogastric tube decompresses the stom- The abdomen is notoriously difficult to evaluate and is much ach and reduces the risk of pulmonary aspiration, but because more likely than the chest to harbor occult life-threatening bleed- maxillofacial injury may provide a pathway into the cranial vault,49 ing. The peritoneal cavity may sequester as much as 3 L of blood the tube should be placed orally when midfacial fractures are pres- with only minimal abdominal distention. Head injury or intoxica- ent. Blood in the gastric aspirate may be the only sign of an oth- tion frequently alters the patient’s response to acute injury, and erwise occult injury to the stomach or the duodenum. pain from associated fractures may overshadow peritoneal irrita- tion secondary to bleeding. Ultrasonography [see Figures 7 and 8] Placement of a Foley catheter empties the bladder, may disclose is the most rapid method of identifying free blood, but it may yield hematuria, and permits the physician to monitor urinary output. false negative results in as many as 15% of patients on initial The Foley catheter should not, however, be inserted until abdom- examination.52,53 DPL [see Figure 9] remains the most reliable inal ultrasonography is completed, and it should not be placed on method of identifying significant intraperitoneal hemorrhage: in an urgent basis in male patients with suspected urethral injuries patients with life-threatening bleeding, its sensitivity approaches (i.e., those with blood at the meatus, a perineal hematoma, 100%.54 A grossly positive aspirate (> 10 ml of blood) mandates a high-riding prostate, or an extensively displaced anterior pelvic emergency laparotomy. fracture). If urethral injury is suspected, a retrograde urethrogram, Assessment of bony stability by means of physical examination followed by a cystogram (to exclude bladder injury) is obtained, and plain films of the pelvis is crucial for the early identification of prioritized in accordance with the given setting. In females, the major pelvic fractures. Life-threatening hemorrhage occurs most urethra is shorter and better protected and thus is rarely injured. commonly with fracture patterns involving the posterior columns Routine x-rays performed simultaneously with the ABCs [see Figure 10].30,55 Appropriate initial management of unstable include lateral cervical spine, anteroposterior chest, and pelvic patients who have a high-risk pelvic fracture on initial pelvic x-ray films. Once life-threatening injuries have been addressed, thoracic includes blood volume replacement (including early blood and and lumbar spine films should be obtained in patients who com- fresh frozen plasma [FFP]) and application of a pelvic binder; plain of back pain, those with neurologic deficits, and those with wrapping with a sheet is also effective [see Figure 11]. high-risk mechanisms of injury in whom physical examination is The next step is to evaluate the response to initial resuscitation unreliable. X-rays of extremities with suspected fractures (includ- and then perform ultrasonography or DPL to determine whether ing the joint above and the joint below) should also be obtained. significant intra-abdominal bleeding is present.56,57 An unstable Given that trauma victims are uniquely susceptible to hypo- patient with clearly positive findings from ultrasonography or thermia, a rectal or bladder temperature probe is essential in those DPL should undergo laparotomy because of the high probability
  • 12. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 12 a b Figure 8 (a) Sagittal ultrasound image of liver, kidney, and diaphragm yields normal findings. (b) Sagittal ultrasound image of right upper quadrant shows blood between liver and kidney and between liver and diaphragm. Figure 9 Illustrated here is the semiopen technique for peri- toneal lavage. A 3 to 4 cm incision is made over the infraumbilical ring, and the linea alba is incised vertically for 1 cm. The fascial edges are grasped with towel clips and elevated. A standard peri- toneal dialysis catheter is introduced into the peritoneum at a 45° angle and then advanced into the pelvis without use of the trocar. If 10 ml of gross blood is aspirated, the study is considered to be positive. Otherwise, 1 L of normal saline (10 ml/kg for children) is infused. The lavage fluid is retrieved by gravity siphonage; the empty saline bag is dropped to the floor. Ultrasonography is help- ful for confirming intraperitoneal fluid infusion. A 50 ml sample of the fluid is submitted for laboratory analysis.
  • 13. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 13 gram depends on the patient’s hemodynamic stability. A CT scan can be helpful in refining triage by identifying extravasation of I.V. contrast (i.e., a blush) and in diagnosing HVIs. A blush should prompt consideration of angiography. Early angiography is a helpful adjunct in managing liver and kidney injuries, though its role in managing acute splenic injuries remains to be estab- lished.60-64 HVIs are notoriously difficult to diagnose; extravasa- tion of oral contrast is rare.65,66 When all signs (e.g., unexplained free fluid, bowel wall thickening, mesenteric streaking, and free air) are considered, however, the sensitivity of CT in making the diagnosis approaches 90%. In questionable cases of HVI in sta- bilized patients, we advocate delayed DPL to search for eleva- tions in WBC count, amylase level, and alkaline phosphatase level. Identification of traumatic brain injury Approximately 20% of blunt trauma patients who arrive in shock have a TBI.67 During initial evaluation, it is important to identify TBI patients who might benefit from an emergency craniotomy.The neurolog- ic examination is of utmost importance.The initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score in the field should be confirmed with prehos- pital personnel, and short-acting sedatives/paralytics should then Figure 10 Pelvic angiography with selective embolization may be an integral component in the early management of a major pelvic crush injury with continuing hemorrhage. of major hepatic, splenic, or mesenteric bleeding. If there is a large pelvic hematoma at the time of laparotomy and the patient is unstable, embolization of the internal iliac artery may be per- formed with a slurry of autogenous clot, microfibrillar collagen, thrombin, and calcium chloride.58 A hemodynamically unstable patient in whom the ultrasonogram is normal and DPL yields confirmatory negative results should undergo prompt pelvic arte- riography for selective embolization.59 Fast track CT scanning to refine triage In unstable pa- tients who respond to initial interventions, the priorities are as fol- lows: (1) identify and quantitate ongoing sources of bleeding, (2) identify TBI, especially in those patients who require immediate craniotomy, and (3) identify any other injuries that call for urgent intervention (e.g., thoracic aortic injury [TAI]) or special precau- tions (e.g., spine fractures). With the widespread availability of multidetector CT scanners, rapid whole-body imaging is now fea- sible, permitting accurate triage for these competing priorities. The important question is whether the patient is stable enough to survive for the time such imaging takes. At our institutions, prepa- ration, transport, and scanning take, in all, roughly 40 minutes. The decision to order CT scanning is made early, while the ABCs are being addressed and ultrasonography and initial plain x-rays are being performed, and depends on the age of the patient, any obvious injuries identified, and the patient’s hemodynamic stabil- ity.The decision is less clear-cut in the common situation in which a previously unstable patient has a positive abdominal ultrasono- gram. The key issue here is which injuries identified by CT scan- ning would alter the decision to perform an urgent laparotomy. Identification of abdominal injuries The decision to per- Figure 11 Shown is the wrapping technique currently used for form an urgent laparotomy in a patient with a positive ultrasono- support of a mechanically unstable pelvic fracture.
  • 14. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 14 be given sparingly. A GCS score lower than 8 and a lateralizing cotomy.71 Currently, however, antihypertensive therapy and ICU neurologic examination indicate a significant risk that emergency monitoring allow delayed repair in patients with significant asso- craniotomy will be needed and, therefore, justify obtaining a CT ciated injuries.72 Delayed repair is safe but is associated with scan of the head if hemodynamic stability permits.68,69 increased infectious complications and longer ICU stays.73 Identification of thoracic aortic injury Initial plain films Identification of limb ischemia The absence of distal should be examined for evidence of TAI. We use the overpene- pulses in a fractured or dislocated extremity should be addressed trated mediastinal view and specifically look for evidence of a urgently. Fractures and dislocations should be reduced, and the mediastinal hematoma. In the multi-institutional study from the extremity should be closely examined for signs of ischemia. American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST), how- Distal SBP measurements comparing injured limbs with nonin- ever, 7% of patients with TAI had a normal ED chest x-ray. We jured limbs (i.e., the ankle-ankle index [AAI] or the ankle- therefore obtain a chest CT scan on the basis of the mechanism brachial index [ABI]) should be obtained. If the ABI or AAI is of injury.70 At our institutions, CT scanning has replaced angiog- less than 0.90 after reduction, CT angiography or formal raphy for the diagnosis of TAI. An occasional angiogram is done angiography should be performed to exclude the presence of a to confirm the diagnosis of great vessel injury or to clarify the vas- vascular injury.74,75 A pulseless extremity is best evaluated in the cular anatomy before thoracotomy. OR by means of on-table angiography. Delayed diagnosis as a The management of TAI has changed markedly over the past result of waiting for formal angiography is a preventable cause of decade. Traditionally, a diagnosis of TAI mandated urgent thora- limb amputation. Discussion Prehospital Care include RSI have been instituted. This practice may, however, be associated with worse outcomes.3 Patients intubated in the field ADVANCED TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT are routinely hyperventilated, and this state has adverse physio- The growing sophistication of emergency medical services has logic consequences. Increased intrathoracic pressure obstructs expanded the scope of prehospital care, but the extent of prehos- venous return to the heart, impairs venous drainage from the pital interventions remains a highly controversial issue.1,2 In trau- brain, and, in hypovolemic patients, decreases cardiac output. ma, advocates of the so-called scoop-and-run philosophy argue Additionally, a low PaCO2 causes cerebral vasoconstriction. that resuscitative efforts in the field unnecessarily delay provision Routine end-tidal capnometry for TBI patients undergoing field of definitive care and have detrimental effects on physiology and intubation has been proposed as the standard of care for prevent- survival when overzealously applied.3,5 At present, there is little ing excessive hyperventilation.4 evidence to support the use of ATLS in prehospital management of urban trauma patients. ATLS skills may be of value in rural Prehospital Volume Resuscitation areas where transport time exceeds 30 minutes, but unfortunate- A provocative 1994 clinical trial found that for hypotensive ly, the limited volume of serious trauma in such areas makes it dif- patients with penetrating torso injuries, survival improved when ficult to gain the experience necessary to maintain this expertise. fluid resuscitation was delayed until surgical intervention had controlled the source of hemorrhage.6 A subsequent subset analy- Airway Management sis, however, revealed that survival was improved only in patients The goal of initial resuscitation is to restore adequate oxygen who had sustained cardiac injuries, not in patients who had sus- delivery to vital organs. Efforts to improve tissue perfusion will be tained major vascular, abdominal solid organ, or noncardiac tho- unproductive unless the oxygen content of the circulating blood is racic injuries.78 Although this clinical trial had some methodolog- sufficient. Airway patency and maintenance of adequate ventilation ic flaws, it is important because it emphasizes that source control are thus the initial priorities. However, intubation and positive of hemorrhage is an overriding priority in hemodynamically pressure ventilation inhibit venous return to the heart and detri- unstable patients. mentally decrease cardiac output in hypovolemic patients.76 In Whether fluid resuscitation should be withheld until control of addition, emergency airway control after blunt trauma should be hemorrhage is achieved is doubtful; such an approach is clearly performed with the assumption that an unstable cervical spine not the current standard of care. The point at issue is whether it fracture exists until such injuries are excluded radiologically, but is preferable to administer fluids to restore oxygen delivery to tis- this policy does not preclude RSI.The current recommendation— sue, thus potentially causing hemodilution and disruption of early orotracheal intubation with in-line manual stabilization of the head hemostatic clots, or to withhold fluid resuscitation, thus prolong- and neck—has proved safe in clinical series to date. When orotra- ing cellular shock to the point where it may be irreversible by the cheal intubation fails, the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is a rapid, time operative control is accomplished. At present, the rational safe, and effective technique for maintaining temporary airway compromise between these two approaches is hypotensive resus- control until definitive medical care becomes available.77 For citation with moderate volume loading.79,80 Whereas this patients with extensive maxillofacial trauma that precludes oral approach is becoming the standard of care for penetrating trau- intubation, cricothyrotomy has been the traditional alternative, but ma, its application to blunt trauma is not as clear. Some 20% of this procedure has some risks, particularly in children. patients with major torso trauma have a serious concomitant TBI; if they are inadequately resuscitated, reduced cerebral perfusion Prehospital Intubation of Patients with TBI pressure may lead to devastating secondary brain injury. The Because hypoxia has been associated with increased mortality anticipated availability of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers may in patients with TBI, aggressive prehospital airway protocols that further confound the hypotensive resuscitation debate.
  • 15. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 15 Resuscitation with Hypertonic Saline BLOOD VOLUME RESTITUTION Small-volume hypertonic saline (HS) has been shown to be as Crystalloid versus Colloid effective as large-volume crystalloid in expanding plasma volume and enhancing cardiac output.81 Furthermore, HS increases per- Resuscitation with isotonic crystalloids has been the standard fusion of the microcirculation, presumably by inducing selective of care in the United States since the late 1960s. A number of arteriolar vasodilation and by reducing the swelling of RBCs and clinical trials were performed in the 1970s and 1980s that com- endothelium82; however, this improved microcirculation could pared isotonic crystalloid resuscitation with colloid resuscita- lead to increased bleeding. The resuscitative effectiveness of HS tion. Individually, these trials were underpowered and reported can be further enhanced by combining it with dextran (hyper- conflicting results. When subjected to meta-analysis, they yield- tonic saline dextran [HSD]).83 ed no consistent differences in overall outcome.91 When the In view of the small volumes needed to achieve the desired same data were subjected to subgroup analysis, however, the use effects, there has been great interest in employing these fluids for of isotonic crystalloids in trauma patients appeared to be associ- field resuscitation in both military and civilian settings. A number ated with improved survival. A large clinical trial published in of trials investigating the use of HS and HSD have been per- 2004 found no differences in outcome between crystalloid and formed. Individually, these trials reported inconsistent results in colloid resuscitation in ICU patients, but again, subgroup analy- terms of improved survival; however, collectively, the trials did sis demonstrated improved outcomes in trauma patients receiv- confirm that a bolus of either HS or HSD was safe.84 Meta-analy- ing crystalloids.92 Although these subgroup analyses are not sis of the data suggested that HS was no better than the current definitive, they are consistent with the early laboratory studies, standard of care (isotonic crystalloid fluids) but that HSD might which indicated that survival in hemorrhagic shock is optimized be better.83 Subgroup analysis of the data showed that the patients by administering isotonic crystalloids and blood in a 3:1 ratio. who benefited most from HSD were those who presented with Subsequent animal studies suggested that the optimal ratio rises shock and concomitant severe TBI. The results of this analysis to 8:1 in severe shock.93,94 However, several current reports sug- agreed with laboratory data showing that in comparison with iso- gest that “damage control” surgery combined with aggressive tonic crystalloid, both HS and HSD raised cerebral perfusion ICU resuscitation appears to be saving the lives of many patients pressure, lowered intracranial pressure, and reduced brain who previously would have exsanguinated, but it also appears to edema.85 be causing adverse edema in the brain (increased ICP), the lung The argument in favor of HS resuscitation is even more com- (worsened pulmonary edema), and the gut (the abdominal com- pelling with the recognition that this approach markedly reduces partment syndrome).27 the inflammatory response (specifically, neutrophil cytotoxicity) Choice of Crystalloid in animal models of hemorrhagic shock, ischemia and reperfu- sion, and sepsis. However, one well-executed trial that tested HS The selection of a crystalloid engenders less controversy than for field resuscitation of TBI patients in shock did not demon- the choice between crystalloid and colloid. Although newer form- strate any benefits.86 ulations (e.g., Ringer’s ethyl pyruvate) are being tested clinically,95 NS and LR remain the most commonly used fluids. In theory, LR is preferable to NS because it provides a better buffer for meta- Emergency Department Management bolic acidosis, but to date, investigators have not documented any important differences in outcome.96,97 One laboratory study EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT RESUSCITATIVE THORACOTOMY found that NS and LR were equivalent in the setting of moderate ED thoracotomy is an integral part of the initial management hemorrhagic shock but that, in the setting of massive hemorrhage, of trauma patients who arrive in extremis.87 When blood volume NS was associated with greater physiologic derangement (e.g., is depleted or pericardial tamponade is present, closed-chest hyperchloremic acidosis) and higher mortality.25 Clinical experi- compression is ineffective in maintaining systemic blood flow,88 ence confirms the adverse effects of iatrogenic hyperchloremia.98 whereas open cardiac massage maintains coronary and cerebral NS is preferred, however, when blood is being transfused simul- perfusion for as long as half an hour. Adjunctive thoracic aorta taneously.99 There is some concern that the calcium in LR could occlusion enhances both coronary and cerebral perfusion by exceed the chelating capabilities of the citrate in the stored blood, maintaining aortic diastolic pressure and increasing carotid sys- resulting in the formation of clots that could enter the circulation tolic pressure. Aortic cross-clamping also decreases subdiaphrag- and compromise the microcirculation, but at present, there is no matic bleeding in the event of associated abdominal injury.89 hard evidence that this is a significant issue. These benefits are obtained at the expense of increased myocar- dial oxygen demand and poor perfusion of the lower torso. Transfusion Trigger Clinical experience suggests that 30 minutes is the limit for pre- The optimal hemoglobin level continues to be a subject of live- vention of splanchnic ischemic sequelae. ly debate.100 Early laboratory studies demonstrated that survival The possibility of patient salvage is largely determined by the was improved when the hemoglobin concentration was main- mechanism of injury, as well as by the patient’s condition at the tained in the range of 12 to 13 g/dl.101 Subsequent studies using time of thoracotomy. Success rates approach 50% in patients arriv- isovolemic hemodilution models, however, indicated that the ing in shock from a penetrating cardiac wound and 20% in patients optimal level for maintaining oxygen delivery was 10 g/dl, and with penetrating wounds as a whole. On the other hand, patient until relatively recently, this value represented the recommended outcome is dismal when ED thoracotomy is performed in the set- level for critically ill patients.102,103 Currently, there is a growing ting of blunt trauma; it is now considered futile in patients lacking recognition that administration of stored packed RBCs can cardiac activity. Adding laparotomy in the emergency department adversely affect outcome by modulating the inflammatory for definitive control of abdominal hemorrhage has not improved response (amplifying early proinflammation and aggravating late outcomes.90 immunosuppression) and by impairing tissue perfusion (limiting
  • 16. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 16 access to or obstructing the microcirculation as a consequence of Major Torso Trauma reduced RBC deformability).104-106 A 1999 randomized trial found that patients who received transfusions according to a restrictive policy (i.e., transfusion when the hemoglobin concen- tration fell below 7 g/dl) did as well as, and possibly better than, Active patients who received transfusions on a more liberal basis (i.e., Hemorrhage transfusion when the hemoglobin concentration fell below 10 g/dl).107 Admittedly, this study was done in a select group of eu- Progressive Coagulopathy Iatrogenic volemic patients; thus, it is not clear precisely how applicable the Factors results are to severely injured trauma patients requiring resuscita- tion from shock. In addition, if blood transfusions are to be restricted during acute resuscitation, it is not clear which alterna- Core Cellular Hypothermia Shock tive fluids should be used. Choice of Blood Product Metabolic Tissue Fully crossmatched blood is rarely available for ED trauma Acidosis Injury resuscitation. Uncrossmatched type-specific whole blood or packed RBCs can be safely administered,108,109 and either alterna- Contact Massive tive is available in most hospitals within 20 minutes. If type-specif- Activation Transfusion ic blood is unavailable, reconstituted O-negative packed RBCs should be used. Type O-negative blood has no cellular antigens; therefore, the risk of major hemolytic reactions caused by patient Clotting Factor antibodies attacking donor RBC antigens is minimal. When O- Deficiencies Preexisting negative packed RBCs are unavailable, O-positive packed red Diseases blood cells may be used.The patient will become sensitized to the Rh factor, which is significant for women of childbearing age. Figure 12 The so-called bloody vicious cycle is a syndrome that Blood Substitutes has a multifactorial pathogenesis. The usual manifestations include coagulopathy, hypothermia, and metabolic acidosis.118 As a consequence of the limited supply of stored blood and the recognition that transfusions contribute to adverse patient outcomes, there has been a resurgence of interest in blood sub- been tested extensively in phase I and phase II trials in trauma stitutes. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers date back to 1933, patients and has proved to be safe and effective.113,114 A phase III when it was shown that hemolysates could transport oxygen in prehospital trial is under way. mammals.110 Unfortunately, when these solutions were infused EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF NONRESPONDERS into humans, they had excessively toxic effects (i.e., vasocon- striction, acute renal failure, and abdominal pain), which were BP and HR are the current standard-of-care monitors of shock attributed to stromal contamination. Although the next genera- resuscitation in the field and in the ED. Both, however, are insen- tion of carrier solutions was stroma-free, toxic effects persisted sitive markers of early compensated shock; alternative monitors are and were attributed to the instability of the hemoglobin badly needed for assessing the adequacy of tissue perfusion with a tetramer, which spontaneously dissociates into dimers and view to avoiding both underresuscitation and overresuscitation. monomers.111 Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a simple technique that mon- One formulation of stabilized tetramer, diaspirin cross-linked itors oxygen saturation in tissue, has been shown to track oxygen hemoglobin, was authorized for a phase III study in trauma delivery reasonably well during shock resuscitation and is being patients.112 However, the trial was prematurely stopped because of tested as an ED monitor.115 Transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) the unexpectedly high mortality in the treatment group (24/52 monitoring and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) monitor- [46%], compared with 8/46 [17%] in the control group). ing have also shown promising results in the ED environment.116 Although this event was judged a major setback for clinical imple- The challenge is to identify as early as possible those patients mentation of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, the product used who are not responding to early interventions. Blind and aggres- had already been shown to increase pulmonary and systemic vas- sive volume loading in the hope of normalizing BP and HR, with- cular resistance in animals. Tetrameric hemoglobin extravasates out appropriate emphasis on control of hemorrhage, sets the stage from the vascular space, binds nitric oxide within the vessel wall, for the so-called bloody vicious cycle or the abdominal compart- and thereby results in unopposed vasoconstriction.This issue has ment syndrome. been effectively addressed by polymerizing the hemoglobin BLOODY VICIOUS CYCLE tetramer. The additional benefit of these larger moieties is that they exert less colloid osmotic activity, which means that a higher Among the most devastating complications of massive blood dose can be administered. and fluid resuscitation is a bleeding diathesis. Paradoxically, A further limitation of earlier hemoglobin-based oxygen carri- although clotting is accelerated at the capillary level because of ers was that because of the loss of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, oxygen shock and tissue damage, the circulating blood becomes hypoco- affinity was greatly increased; the partial pressure of oxygen agulable.117-119 The pathogenesis of this bloody vicious cycle is required to produce 50% saturation (P50) decreased from the nor- complex [see Figure 12]. Factors predictive of a severe coagulo- mal 26 mm Hg to 12 mm Hg. This problem was addressed by pathic state include (1) massive rapid blood transfusion (10 pyridoxylation of the hemoglobin tetramer, which raised the P50 units/4 hr), (2) persistent cellular shock (oxygen consumption to 29 mm Hg. One such polymerized hemoglobin solution has index < 110 ml/min/m2; lactate concentration > 5 mmol/L), (3)
  • 17. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 17 progressive metabolic acidosis (pH < 7.20; base deficit > 14 lism.124 Acidosis in the trauma patient is caused primarily by a rise mEq/L), and (4) refractory core hypothermia (< 34° C).120 in lactic acid production secondary to tissue hypoxia and usually Stored blood is deficient in factors V and VIII and platelets but resolves when the volume deficit has been corrected. Administra- replete with fibrin split products and vasoactive substances. tion of sodium bicarbonate may cause a leftward shift of the oxy- Timely administration of FFP and platelets will minimize the risk hemoglobin dissociation curve, reducing tissue oxygen extraction, of coagulopathy after massive transfusion.29,30 Presumptive factor and it may worsen intracellular acidosis caused by carbon dioxide replacement, though not usually indicated in the early resuscita- production.119 On the other hand, adrenergic receptors may tion phase, is appropriate in patients with massive hemorrhage become desensitized with protracted acidosis. Studies indicate that caused by unstable pelvic fracture. vasopressin may be more effective than epinephrine as hemor- Also germane to the initial period of massive blood transfusion rhagic shock approaches irreversibility.125,126 Bicarbonate infusion, are the potential complications of acidosis, hypothermia, and therefore, should be limited to persons with protracted shock. hypocalcemia. Moderate hypothermia (< 32° C) causes platelet Hypocalcemia caused by citrate binding of ionized calcium sequestration and inhibits the release of platelet factors that are does not occur until the blood transfusion rate exceeds 100 important in the intrinsic clotting pathway. In addition, it has con- ml/min (1 U/5 min). Decreased serum levels of ionized calcium sistently been associated with poor outcome in trauma patients.121 depress myocardial function before impairing coagulation.127,128 Core temperature often falls insidiously because of exposure at Calcium gluconate (10 mg/kg I.V.) should be reserved for cases the scene and in the ED and because of administration of resus- in which there is ECG evidence of QT interval prolongation or, citation fluids stored at ambient temperature. The first step is to in rare instances, for cases of unexplained hypotension during prevent further heat loss by covering the body (including the massive transfusion. head) and infusing warm blood and fluid. Another simple tech- ABDOMINAL COMPARTMENT SYNDROME nique is to heat and aerosolize ventilator gases. Active external rewarming with heating blankets and increased room tempera- Abdominal compartment syndrome has emerged as a virtual ture should also be employed. These techniques are not, howev- epidemic in busy trauma centers that practice damage-control er, very effective in reversing established hypothermia. surgery and goal-oriented ICU resuscitation.129 This syndrome is The use of bicarbonate in the treatment of systemic acidosis an early event, and its clinical trajectory can be accurately pre- remains controversial. Moderate acidosis (pH < 7.20) impairs dicted within 3 to 6 hours after ED admission.27 At admission to coagulation,122 myocardial contractility,123 and oxidative metabo- the ICU, high-risk patients have significant intra-abdominal hypertension and are in persistent shock. Contrary to conven- tional wisdom, they do not respond well to preload-directed Prolonged Shock resuscitation.130 In fact, continued aggressive resuscitation pre- cipitates the full-blown syndrome [see Figure 13]. Fundamental changes are needed in pre-ICU resuscitation. Failure to recognize ongoing bleeding, indiscriminate crystalloid Gut Ischemia-Reperfusion infusion, and failure to prioritize definitive measures for hemor- rhage control have been identified as key issues in the ED.131 We share the belief that colloids may reduce the incidence of abdom- Overwhelming of Antiedema inal compartment syndrome, but in our view, this possible bene- Safety Factors fit must be weighed against the potentially detrimental effects of colloids. In severe hemorrhagic shock, the permeability of capil- lary membranes increases, allowing the entry of colloids into the Crystalloid Gut Edema Filtration Secretion interstitial space, which can then exacerbate edema and impair Resuscitation IAP tissue oxygenation. The theory that these high-molecular-weight agents plug capillary leaks that occur during neutrophil-mediated Gut Dysfunction organ injury has not been proved.132,133 Furthermore, it has been suggested that resuscitation with albumin induces renal failure Transcapillary and impairs pulmonary function.134 Fluid Flux Similarly, hydroxyethyl starch (Hetastarch; Baxter Healthcare, Abdominal Compartment Deerfield, Illinois) has been shown to induce renal dysfunction in Syndrome patients with septic shock and in recipients of kidneys from brain- dead donors.135 Hetastarch also has a limited role in massive Venous Compression resuscitation because it causes coagulopathy and hyperchloremic acidosis as a result of its high chloride content. Another hydrox- yethyl starch preparation (Hextend; BioTime, Berkeley, Cardiac Preload California) has been developed that purportedly does not cause these adverse effects, but it has not been studied in the setting of massive resuscitation.136,137 Figure 13 Depicted is the so-called saltwater vicious cycle, which In addition, alternative crystalloid solutions are being devel- results in the development of abdominal compartment syndrome. oped that not only expand the intravascular space and replenish The term filtration secretion refers to the process by which increasing gut edema causes interstitial pressure to rise to high the extracellular fluid but also have anti-inflammatory properties levels, leading to disruption of the interstitial matrix. Ultimately, (e.g., Ringer’s ethyl pyruvate).95 The data currently available sug- as a result, the villus tips spring leaks, through which interstitial gest that crystalloid administration should be restrained. fluid passes into the gut lumen. (IAP—intra-abdominal Alternative means of enhancing tissue oxygen delivery may pressure) involve earlier use of inotropic or vasoactive agents.
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  • 20. © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. ACS Surgery: Principles and Practice 7 TRAUMA AND THERMAL INJURY 1 INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING TRAUMA — 20 123. Clowes GHA Jr, Sabga GH, Konitaxis A, et al: cemia: clinical and experimental studies. J 135. Schortgen F, Lacherade JC, Bruneel F, et al: Effects of acidosis on cardiovascular function in Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 78:185, 1979 Effects of hydroxyethyl starch and gelatin on surgical patients. Ann Surg 154:524, 1961 129. Trunkey D, Carpenter MA, Holcroft J: Calcium renal function in severe sepsis: a multicenter ran- 124. Fry DE, Ratciffe DJ,Yates JR: The effects of aci- flux during hemorrhagic shock in baboons. J domized study. Lancet 357:911, 2001 dosis on canine hepatic and renal oxidative phos- Trauma 16:633, 1976 136. Gan TJ, Bennett-Guerrero E, Phillips-Bute B, et phorylation. Surgery 88:269, 1980 130. Balogh Z, McKinley BA, Cox CS, et al: Ab- al: Hextend, a physiologically balanced plasma dominal compartment syndrome: the cause or expander for large volume use in major surgery: 125. Douglas ME, Downs JB, Mantini EL, et al: effect of multiple organ failure? Shock 20:483, a randomized phase III clinical trial. Anesth Alteration of oxygen tension and oxyhemoglobin 2003 Analg 88:992, 1999 saturation: a hazard of sodium bicarbonate administration. Arch Surg 114:326, 1979 131. Balogh Z, McKinley BA, Cocanour CS, et al: 137. Boldt J, Haisch G, Suttner S, et al: Effects of a Patients with impending abdominal compart- new modified, balanced hydroxyethyl starch 126. Haas T, Voelckel WG, Wiedermann F, et al: ment syndrome do not respond to early volume preparation (Hextend) on measures of coagula- Successful resuscitation of a traumatic cardiac tion. Br J Anaesth 89:722, 2002 arrest victim in hemorrhagic shock with vaso- loading. Am J Surg 186:602, 2003 pressin: a case report and brief review of the lit- 132. Ley K: Plugging the leaks. Nat Med 7:1105, erature. J Trauma 57:177, 2004 2001 Acknowledgments 127. Morales D, Madigan J, Cullinane S, et al: 133. Conhaim RL, Watson KE, Potenza BM, et al: Reversal by vasopressin of intractable hypoten- Pulmonary capillary sieving of Hetastarch is not Figures 1 and 3 Carol Donner, revised by Tom sion in the late phase of hemorrhagic shock. altered by LPS-induced sepsis. J Trauma 46:800, Moore. Circulation 100:226, 1999 1999 Figures 2, 4a, 4b, and 9 Carol Donner. 128. Stulz PM, Scheidegger D, Drop LJ, et al: 134. Lucas CE: The water of life: a century of confu- Figures 4c, 5, and 11 Tom Moore. Ventricular pump performance during hypocal- sion. J Am Coll Surg 192:86, 2001 Figure 12 Seward Hung.

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