• Save
Data utilization presentation conference 2010
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Data utilization presentation conference 2010

on

  • 3,143 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,143
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
3,038
Embed Views
105

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 105

http://www.cpc.unc.edu 96
http://www.slideshare.net 6
https://www.cpc.unc.edu 2
http://testweb.cpc.unc.edu 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Stress that the purpose of M&E is to inform ACTION. So, use of M&E information at the program level is inherent in its purpose. M&E is an essential process in providing effective and efficient services and ensuring that programs are relevant and successful. For example, it helps us make informed decisions about such questions as appropriate staffing and other necessary resources. M&E helps us know whether a program is being true to its stated goals and objectives. For instance, …. M&E helps us evaluate whether our programs are having their desired impact. If we want to know how a program is performing we might assess it against targets that have been set for specific indicators by the program or funding agency or government. For instance, we might assess if a breastfeeding program is reaching its goals in providing counseling to pregnant women during ANC and by the percentage of children under six months who are exclusively breastfed. However, for M&E to have this desired impact, M&E data and information must be used strategically by programs, service delivery organizations, policymakers and other stakeholders.
  • Evidence based decisions lead to better health outcomes. The use of data helps to design and manage health programs, and results in better health outcomes.
  • Something that can be seen all over the globe in programs and business is that oftentimes people see M&E as policing or as a process meant to criticize and undermine their work. In other situations, an M&E unit is only established for the purpose of reporting… Policymakers, program managers and M&E specialists can be partners in progress – designing new programs, making improvements to plans and programs, policymaking, and at the facility level – identifying gaps and opportunities.
  • Data demand and utilization are central to achieving evidence-based decision making. We need to consider three aspects of demand for information – not only the quality of the information (technical approach), but also the individuals who use or should use the information, and the health or organizational systems within which they operate. This is called the PRISM framework. This approach to Data Demand and Use is best illustrated by the strategic triangle linking Technical, Individual Behavior, and System. Sustainable demand for high quality health information is most likely to result from a strategy that simultaneously focuses on three fronts - improving technical quality of data and data tools, building individual capacity for understanding and using data, and strengthening the organizational context in support of data collection and use. This strategy should be pursued with a clear appreciation of the importance of understanding the political, cultural, and social context of decision making. In the slides that follow, we will fold individual behavior into systems and consider two ways of initiating the discussion – through the systems in which decisions are made, or through the information which is used or needed. These approaches are not mutually exclusive, but meet up in the middle. However, they do represent different ways of approaching the result of increased user demand.
  • Ask participants to brainstorm some types of decisions that fit into these categories
  • Ask participants to brainstorm some types of decisions that fit into these categories
  • This slide leads nicely into the Decision Calendar
  • It is important to note that there are many other legitimate factors that influence decision-making outside of evidence-based data and information.
  • Understanding how programs work and the reporting systems of the organizations reporting data, can help you to establish effective and useful feedback to reporters and other stakeholders at the community, district and regional levels. It is a two-way process. By understanding the intended audiences and what is important to them and their programs, ensuring that people are seeing the value in their reporting of data, will also help to ensure on-time reporting, as well as better quality data. - Also, considering the triangle that I showed earlier, we need to engage stakeholders to discuss what deicsions they make and what information they may find helpful. Training and supervision to support reporting and documentation is very important – including quality feedback to lower levels. Finally, a common understanding among those who deliver services and report on them, those who analyze the data and those who need the information

Data utilization presentation conference 2010 Data utilization presentation conference 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Using M&E Data to guide Policy formulation, programme planning and improvement Kola Oyediran and Samson Bamidele MEASURE Evaluation John Snow Incorporated
  • Presentation Outline
    • Importance of monitoring and evaluation
    • Possible uses of data and information
    • Barriers to data and information use
    • Using data to inform decision-making
    • Examples of data use
  • Purposes of monitoring and evaluation
    • Determine whether a plan or program is on schedule with planned activities
    • Assess whether a policy, plan or program has produced desired impacts
    • Generate knowledge:
      • Identify factors (individual, community, programmatic) that influence health outcomes
    • Inform policy, planning or program decisions: new services, resource allocation, corrections
    • Evidence-based decisions lead to better health outcomes
  • There are no enemies in M&E
    • Policymakers, program managers and M&E specialists can be partners
    • Strong decision-making and management relies on high quality M&E information
    • Data quality is linked to data use
    • Inform policies and plans
    • Advocate for additional resources, policies and programs
    • Strengthen programs and improve results
    • Ensure accountability and reporting
    • Improve quality of services provided
    • Contribute to global lessons learned
    We can use information to…
  • Using NNRIMS data to inform resource allocation
    • HIV/AIDS M&E focal person for LACA in Doma, Nassarawa State, submitted NNRIMS quarterly report to LGA Chairman;
    • 53 people in Doma tested HIV positive in the first quarter of 2006;
    • Chairman procured 480 HIV Test Kits to be distributed through 4 local health facilities, enabling more people to get tested in Doma.
  • Strategy for Strengthen sub-national M&E system
    • NACA in collaboration with stakeholders conducted an assessment of HIV/AIDS M&E system
    • Relatively strong M&E system at national level but weaker at the sub-national level
    • Develop program strategy to engage development /implementing partners on how sub-national level capacity will be strengthened.
  • What Determines Data Demand and Information Use? POLITICS CULTURE SOCIETY Decision making occurs within political, cultural, and social contexts * Based on PRISM analytical framework (LaFond, Fields et al. 2005 The PRISM: An Analytical Framework for Understanding Performance of Health Information Systems in Developing Countries. MEASURE Evaluation). SYSTEMS APPROACH TECHNICAL APPROACH INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR
  • Data are often underutilized because of…
    • Technical constraints
      • Technical skills,
      • Availability of computers,
      • Data system design,
      • Definition of indicators,
      • Lack of data quality assurance protocols
    • Organizational Constraints
      • Structural – roads, telecommunication
      • Organizational – clarity of roles, support, flow of information
      • Political interference
    * Based on PRISM analytical framework (LaFond, Fields et al. 2005 The PRISM: An Analytical Framework for Understanding Performance of Health Information Systems in Developing Countries. MEASURE Evaluation).
  • Data are often underutilized because of…
    • Individual constraints
      • Decision maker attitudes,
      • Staff motivation,
      • Lack of “data culture”
    * Based on PRISM analytical framework (LaFond, Fields et al. 2005 The PRISM: An Analytical Framework for Understanding Performance of Health Information Systems in Developing Countries. MEASURE Evaluation).
  • How to ensure that information is being used to make inform decisions?
    • Steps include ……
      • Understand how data are produced and used
      • Identify and address barriers to using information
      • Strengthen decision-making
  • Barriers …. To data use
    • “ We are always giving patient forms and data to our M&E Unit, who then gives data to donors and the government. I am the head doctor and I never have the chance to look through the data before they go up. We just keep giving data up and up, and we never hear back about it…”
    • Head of ART facility, Nigeria
  • Decisions
    • Policies and plans
      • Advocate for new policies and plans
      • Select priorities for strategic plans
    • Program design and planning
      • Select messages for prevention campaigns
      • New strategies to increase coverage
    • Program management, improvement and operations
      • Training and supervision of program staff
      • Logistics and supply management
    • Different people need information for different kinds of decisions
    • Engage in dialogue with stakeholders to fully understand the
    • decisions they make,
    • information they need, and
    • best way to present that information.
  • Factors other than evidence-based information influence decisions
    • Power relationships
    • Timing
    • Competing priorities
    • Public opinion
    • Political ideology
    • Arbitrariness
    • Local culture of decision-making
    • Other information sources
  • What do they need to know?
    • Policies and Plans (Policymakers, leaders)
      • Population health status
      • Principal causes of mortality
      • Evaluation of policies
    • Program design (Directors, Program managers)
      • Cultural practices
      • Population knowledge and attitudes
      • Groups at high risk
    • Management and Operations (Managers, service providers)
      • Do providers have supplies they need?
      • Are clients getting the right services?
      • Are people being turned away?
  • In order to make information useful, we need:
      • Understanding of how programs work, how they collect and report information.
      • To engage others to discuss what decisions they make and what information they may find helpful
      • Training and supervision to support reporting and documentation – including feedback.
      • Common understanding among those who deliver services and report on them, those who analyze the data and those who need the information.
    • Decisions based on evidence lead to better health outcomes
    • We all have a role in M&E – partners in progress
    • Purpose of M&E is not just to produce more information but to improve action
    • High quality information is needed for decision-making at policy, advocacy, planning, management and program levels
    • Investments in improved information systems will be wasted if not used to inform decisions
    Key Messages
  • THANK YOU! Visit us online at http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through Cooperative Agreement GHA-A-00-08-00003-00 and is implemented by the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in partnership With Futures Group International, John Snow, Inc., Macro International Inc., Management Sciences for Health, and Tulane University. The views expressed in this presentation do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States government.