Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010
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Closing the Gender Gap in Engineering - June 2010

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This presentation was given to counselors, teachers, and administrators at the Texas Region X Summer Workshops on June 10, 2010.

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  • Classroom and workforce is a reflection of our culture
  • Life takes engineering is a theme identified that focuses on the field’s essential role and life-changing work. The goal is for the counselors to become aware of and identify the vast work of engineers all around them, and realize that life takes engineering. What is engineering? (Posit questions to determine current mental models of engineering, dispel myths and misconceptions – based on Changing the Conversation research)Where is engineering? (become aware of and identify the vast work of engineers all around them)(grounded in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) study: Changing the Conversation.)
  • Life takes engineering is a theme identified that focuses on the field’s essential role and life-changing work. The goal is for the counselors to become aware of and identify the vast work of engineers all around them, and realize that life takes engineering. What is engineering? (Posit questions to determine current mental models of engineering, dispel myths and misconceptions – based on Changing the Conversation research)Where is engineering? (become aware of and identify the vast work of engineers all around them)(grounded in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) study: Changing the Conversation.)
  • How can you use these activities to talk about engineering with your students? What is the impact?
  • Do you know an engineer? What do they do?Engineers make a world of difference and help shape the future is another message tested in the NAE study. From new farming equipment and safer drinking water to faster electric cars and faster microchips, engineers use their knowledge to improve people’s lives in meaningful ways. In addition, engineers use the latest science, tools, and technology to bring ideas to life. (grounded in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) study: Changing the Conversation.)
  • Former Dallas Cowboys Coach Tom Landry (1952 BSIE) was a graduate of the UH Cullen College of Engineering. Although most people still associate Landry with the University of Texas—because he played college football there as an undergraduate—Landry was also a UH graduate. Between 1966 and 1983, the Cowboys advanced to the NFL playoffs 17 times in 18 seasons, appeared in five Super Bowls and won two world championships. In the early years of the expansion Cowboys, between 1960 and 1965, Landry’s teams were often over-matched by superior talent. Landry responded by creating new schemes for offense and defense that altered the game of football itself.“He was not one of these ‘run-to-the-ball’ guys,” Landry Jr. says. “He had a system, and the flex defense, which we ran so well in the seventies and the sixties, was a very complicated defense. Players couldn’t let emotion take over because if they started running around outside the scheme, the defense wouldn’t work. Each player had to be in the right place. But once it worked, it was coordinated in a way that it could stop anybody.”By the mid 1960s, Landry had revolutionized the scouting and drafting of players by employing computers to analyze and detect players with the greatest potential, as well as talent and ability. Other teams in the league eventually adopted the same methods.
  • Business is 2nd @ ~15%Liberal Arts ~10%Economics ~10%Accounting ~7%
  • How can you use real life examples to introduce engineering to your students?
  • Video source : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXGDRrkaRgUWho is (and gets to be) an engineer?
  • What kind of education does an engineer have?
  • How can you use this knowledge to advocate career/education opportunities in engineering to your students?
  • Women are severely under-represented in the engineering profession. Currently only 20 percent of engineering undergraduates are women. Only ten percent of the engineering work force is women. Research shows that girls and young women lose interest in the fields of study leading to engineering careers by the time they enter college. Even academically prepared girls capable of pursuing engineering in college often don’t consider it as an option.Discuss why we care about the gender gapSource: http://www.eweek.org/NewsStory.aspx?ContentID=160 2. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey, 2007.http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/figh-1.htmImage source: http://shop.mattel.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4032107
  • • Sustaining the U.S. capacity for technological innovation.A better understanding of engineering would educate policy makers and the public as to how engineering contributes to economic development, quality of life, national security, and health.• Attracting young people to careers in engineering. A betterunderstanding of engineering should encourage students to take higher level math and science courses in middle school, thus enabling them to pursue engineering education in the future. This is especially important for girls and underrepresented minorities, who have not historically been attracted to technical careers in large numbers.• Improving technological literacy. To be capable, confidentparticipants in our technology-dependent society, citizens must know something about how engineering and science, among other factors, lead to new technologies (NAE and NRC, 2002).societal cues and environmental factors
  • PEDAGOGY ISSUES FOR GIRLS IN THE STEM CLASSROOM 1. SOCIAL RELEVANCE. Most girls have been socialized into wanting to help others. They therefore tend to be interested in STEM applications that have a role in helping others. How can you transform dull, boring, abstract STEM problems into problems that illustrate the pervasive presence and importance of the subject in our lives? How can you show girls (and boys) that STEM matters in everyday life and has the potential to improve life for many people? 2. SOCIAL PROCESSING. Most girls have been socialized to value, function well in, and enjoy social interaction. Given the importance of collaborative lab group work in STEM, how can you ensure that girls working in collaborative groups don’t passively take the support jobs such as setting up the equipment, entering the data, keyboarding others’ ideas, taking notes, or cleaning up, and don’t routinely accept these roles from other group members? How can you help students learn from each other and verbally process what they are learning? 3. HISTORY OF WOMEN. When girls see mentions of women’s presence in STEM and STEM-related careers, past and present, they come to feel they can have a place there, too. How can you find out who the notable women were, and are, in your subject? How can you introduce women currently working in relevant careers to your female (and male) students? How can you include projects, assignments, or problems that involve women in your subject? 4. EXPERIENCE GAP. Because girls are socialized to take fewer risks with the physical world (e.g., they have less experience with electricity, are less encouraged to take things apart to see how they work), it is likely that fewer girls than boys will have the hands-on experience that is helpful for intuitive understanding of STEM concepts. How do you encourage a classroom in which: · The less experienced girls (and boys) don’t feel ignorant, stupid, or discouraged · The less experienced girls (and boys) get extra, remedial hands-on time · The more experienced students help the less experienced? The culture of the US is reflected in the classroom. How do these things help or hurt encouraging women to become engineers (STEM)How do we counteract this?5. SPEED AND COMPETITIVENESS. The culture of some STEM classes emphasizes speed and competitiveness, while many girls have been socialized to approach tasks thoughtfully, deliberately, and cooperatively. How do you assess how much of a role speed and/or competitiveness play in your classroom? If they play a significant role, how can your organize your classroom to emphasize a more thoughtful, deliberate and cooperative approach, at least some of the time?
  • [From Workshop 5 Handout]
  • Meagan shares her story and how her teachers, counselors, and administrators influenced her decision to pursue engineering.
  • Discussion
  • From Gender Equity Sample Training Toolkit (Item 5)What are the influencing factors in this scenario?As Zoe’s teacher/counselor, how do you respond? Why would Zoe even need an advanced math class?
  • From Gender Equity Sample Training Toolkit (Item 5)How do you answer Maura? Why? How can you supplement the classroom to make up for the inefficiencies of the text?How could you encourage her ideas to construct a hologram or wheel chair?How do you think Maura’s ideas for a final project would differ from a boys?
  • From Gender Equity Sample Training Toolkit (Item 5)How often do you think this happens? Is it always a conscious thought to dismiss dreams on the part of the student?How do you respond to what has happened to Rebecca? Why? If you didn’t know Rebecca well, how would you be able to keep her from “falling through the cracks?”
  • [From Workshop 1 Handout]Questions and answers. Teachers … · Call on boys more than girls. · Accept boys’ called-out answers more than those of girls. · Wait longer for boys’ answers than those of girls. · Allow boys to talk longer than girls. · Frown more during girls’ answers than boys’. · Pose simple factual questions more to girls, more challenging or multi-part questions more to boys. · Allow themselves to be interrupted more easily when girls are speaking than when boys are. · Check the time more frequently when girls are speaking than when boys are. · Call on boys more often by name than girls. Praise, criticism, and feedback. Teachers … · Give girls more neutral responses (“Okay”, “Uh-huh”) and boys more complex responses, both positive and negative. · Praise girls more for the form or appearance of their work, and boys more for the content of their work. · Give boys a hint for how to solve problems for themselves, but solve girls’ problems for them: learned helplessness. · Discipline boys more than girls for similar behavior. · Give boys more criticism and corrective feedback than girls. Physical movement. Teachers … · Position their bodies more toward boys than girls. · Circulate more to boys’ seats or to the “boys’” area of the room. · Make more eye contact with boys than with girls. Student-to-student behavior. Teachers … · Permit students to make gender-biased comments or behaviors to each other. · Permit students to self-segregate by sex. · Permit boys to take more time with hands-on classroom resources such as computers or science equipment. · Permit students to assume tasks in small group work based on gender (female note-taker, male decision-maker, etc.) Other. Teachers … · Assign different tasks on the basis of gender. · Display more wall illustrations of males than females. · Mention the work of more illustrious males in the field than females. · Invite more males to visit the class than females.
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