Careers in Science, Math, and Engineering

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The purpose of this counselor professional development was to inform counselors about STEM careers and how they can help prepare students for such occupations. An overview of major issues involved with gender stereotypes, bias, and disparities in STEM was introduced along with tools and resources to address such concerns in the K-12 environment. Interactive activities saught to develop the counselors’ confidence in advocating and counseling students for careers in STEM. This presentation was designed for the Plano ISD P-12 counselors. The majority of these counselors attended a workshop in 2008 about “What is Engineering?” Some of this workshop was a review, but careers in science and math were also introduced. This specific workshop was presented on Nov 30, 2010 by Meagan Ross (mail@meaganross.com).

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  • This is an activity to get the counselor’s warmed up, as well as wait for everyone to complete the pre-assessment test and other paperwork. We will refer back to these images throughout the workshop. After a few minutes, Facilitator will ask the counselors to openly discuss (large group) some of the things they discovered, Facilitator will make subtle connections between items and STEM careers, and point out some items that may have been missed.The point here: STEM is everywhere.
  • Click to this slide after making the point from the initial activity.
  • Move to introductions of facilitators and sponsors. Tegwin will introduce herself, the guest engineers, & Meagan/Facilitator.
  • If Tegwin, or WTIF want to speak briefly about the program.
  • Just over two years ago, the majority of you attended a workshop on Engineering. This workshop will be a refresher, but we will specifically discuss careers in science and math (little t & e), and the importance of science and math for all STEM careers. Science and math are essentially derivatives of technology and engineering … they are all intertwined and not mutually exclusive.We want you to leave today with two skills and an action plan.
  • Pre Test, introduction 8:30 -8:50We will spend the next 40 minutes learning about STEM careers, and how you can help prepare your students. Then we will spend half and hour discussing gender bias and stereotypes.Finally, you will spend 15 minutes working with your colleagues to develop an implementation and action plan. This time may not be sufficient, but you should have a good start to continue collaboration.
  • It’s important to first understand WHY we are here, and why we care about STEM. U.S. Department of Labor workforce projections for 2018 highlight that nine of the 10 fastest-growing occupations requiring at least a bachelor’s degree will necessitate significant scientific or mathematical training [1]. The United States’ science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce is aging while jobs requiring specialized training are growing at five times the rate of other occupations [1, 2]. STEM workers, who use science and math to solve problems, are needed to replace the many highly skilled workers who will retire over the next decade. A heterogeneous and culturally diverse workforce creates competitive advantage through greater creativity and innovation, and increased quality of team problem solving based on multiple perspectives [3-5]. Therefore, in order to sustain US capacity and increase global competitiveness for technological innovations, it is essential for people from a diverse representation of cultures, ages, and gender to enter STEM occupations.1. National Science Board, Science and engineering indicators 2010 (NSB 10-01). 2010, National Science Foundation: Arlington, VA.2. American Association of University Women, Improve Girls' and Women's Opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. 2010, American Association of University Women.3. Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science Engineering and Technology Development. Land of Plenty: Diversity as America’s Competitive Edge in Science, Engineering and Technology. 2000 12 November 2010; Available from: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2000/cawmset0409/cawmset_0409.pdf.4. Robinson, G. and K. Dechant, Building a Business Case for Diversity. Academy of Management Executive, 1997. 11: p. 21-31.5. American Management Association (AMA), Senior Management Teams: Profiles and Performance. 1998, New York, NY: American Management Association.PREVIOUS NOTES- America’s science, technology, and math workforce is aging while jobs requiring specialized training are growing at five times the rate of other occupations.[AAUW, 2010]If we are to compete effectively in the global marketplace, we must advance the full and equitable participation of all Americans in science, engineering, and technology fields. Since 2000, women have earned approximately half of all science and engineering bachelor’s degrees. However, further examination reveals that there is a significant gender gap in the number of women earning engineering degrees. In 1990, 15.4% of bachelor’s degrees in engineering were awarded to females. The trend peaked in 2000 at 20.6% and has been on a slow decline since, with the most recent data (2007) showing that only 18.6% of bachelor’s degrees in engineering are awarded to women. In a workforce where 41% of biological and life scientists, one third of lawyers and judges, and 30% of physicians are women, a diminutive 11 percent of women represent engineers.Our economy will not only be positively affected by bringing more women, underrepresented minorities, and persons with disabilities into the SET workforce, but our high-tech, scientific, and engineering industries will benefit from their diverse viewpoints and approaches, as well as their skills. (Land of Plenty, 2000)As the data indicate, an increased investment in SET education will boost U.S. global competitiveness by increasing productivity (Land of Plenty 2000)
  • Ask for a raise of hands, who attended 2008 workshop on engineering? Ask the counselors: what is engineering? This is a review from the 2008 workshop.educational research shows that k–12 teachers and students generally have a poor understanding of what engineers do (Cunningham et al., 2005; Cunningham and knight, 2004). Thus, A better understanding of engineering should encourage students to take higher level math and science courses in middle school, enabling them to pursue engineering education in the future. This is especially important for girls and underrepresented minorities, who have not historically been attracted to technical careers in large numbers.
  • The field of engineering consists of a dozen or more disciplines, most of which are highly interdisciplinary. Biomedical engineering is currently THE fastest growing occupation. However, earning a degree in engineering means more than just that. I’ll introduce my bias here, but I believe an education in engineering is the ultimate launching pad towards almost any other career.Did you know, The most common undergraduate degree among Fortune 500 CEOs is Engineering.1 in 5 CEOs have an engineering degree. In 2000, 14% of MIT engineering graduates were being hired by financial firms for their well developed problem solving skills. (beyond technicalities)Here’s a trivia question: Who led an NFL team to advanceto the NFL playoffs 17 times in 18 seasons, appeared in five Super Bowls and won two world championships?Former Dallas Cowboys Coach Tom Landry (1952 BSIE) coached the Cowboys from 66-83. He was a graduate of the UH Cullen College of Engineering. Landry used his expertise in industrial engineering to create new schemes for offense and defense that altered the game of football itself. By the mid 1960s, Landry had revolutionized the scouting and drafting of players by employing computers to analyze and detect players with the greatest potential, as well as talent and ability. Texas Instruments makes it an effort to only hire engineers for their marketing and sales force. In order to market and sell to engineers, you have to know the language!Biomedicical or mechanical engineers may go onto medicine. Think of the applications of engineering on health, medicine, and all of the innovations allowing people better lives. So as we continue through this workshop, think about your students, and how it is our goal to set them up for success! Let’s learn about how we can encourage them to pursue an education that will enable them countless options. And it should start as soon as possible! Why? Immersed in a society that is dominated and driven by work, and vulnerable to social influences of prestige and gender bias, children as young as five years of age begin to postulate what career they will one day have(Gottfredson, 1981). Young people tend to choose professions that are familiar(Parker & Jarolimek, 1997), whether traditions in their family, or professions that have been exposed to them through education and experience. Consider, are you students aware that engineering or other STEM careers are available to them?
  • For today’s workshop, we are only going to highlight careers in Math & Science. We are going to quickly show some examples of potential careers your students could pursue using science and math skills. This list is available on a website for you to reference later. As we review these fun and exciting career options, think about the careers related to the items you selected in the magazines. These examples will allow you to make connections from the “real-world” to science and math careers. The purpose of exploring different careers in math in science is to provide you with an arsenal of examples to share with your students. Also, Try to recognize the themes of health, happiness, and safety among these careers.
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Source: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtmlAdditional Math careers:Economist, Math Teacher
  • ADD LINK TO handouts: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml
  • Ask for a few examples of careers counselors identified.Ask: Were you surprised by any of the careers we just learned about? Why? What themes of health, happiness, and safety among these careers did you recognize?What have you learned about careers in Science & Math? Do you have any questions about careers from the images you selected?
  • Ask for a few examples of careers counselors identified.Ask: Were you surprised by any of the careers we just learned about? Why? What themes of health, happiness, and safety among these careers did you recognize?What have you learned about careers in Science & Math? Do you have any questions about careers from the images you selected?
  • Ask for a few examples of careers counselors identified.Ask: Were you surprised by any of the careers we just learned about? Why? What themes of health, happiness, and safety among these careers did you recognize?What have you learned about careers in Science & Math? Do you have any questions about careers from the images you selected?
  • Refer to articles:Ros, M., S. Schwartz, et al. (1999). "Basic individual values, work values, and the meaning of work." Applied psychology 48(1): 49-71.Duffy, R. and W. Sedlacek (2009). "What is most important to students' long-term career choices: analyzing 10-year trends and group differences." Journal of Career Development 34(2): 149-163.A sample of 31,731 students were surveyed from 1995 to 2004, and results revealed that men placed a greater emphasis on making money, women placed a greater emphasis on working with people and contributing to society.White students placed a greater emphasis on having independence and intrinsic interest in the field, and African Americans and Asian Americans espoused higher extrinsic work values. Additional analyses revealed significant cohort differences, as over the 10-year period students reported a 10% increase in the selection of intrinsic values, a 5% decrease in selection of extrinsic values, and a 5% decrease in selection of prestige values. This suggests that students may be placing more emphasis on intrinsic interest and autonomy in their career choice and less emphasis on making money and finding prestigious careers.[duffy, 2009]Based on what you’ve learned, how can STEM careers appeal to all students? STEM Careers are interesting, and many roles can allow for independence, STEM Careers are highly collaborative and make significant contributions to society, STEM Careers are high-paying and are in high demand, STEM Careers are prestigious & respected occupationsHave them refer to handout fig5_aauw_whysofew. Ask them to take a minute to examine the table. Acknowledge the disparities.
  • White Paper prepared for U. S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley. Math Equals Opportunity. 1997 12 November 2010]; Available from: www2.ed.gov/pubs/math/mathemat.pdf.These contrasts signal that many students do not understand the importance of, and requirements for, taking rigorous mathematics and science courses in high school, including the need to take algebra by the 8th grade.How does this align with your experience counseling students?STEM preparation will give students more career choices and options and the chance to have a good standard of living
  • Introduce first that it is important for students to be aware of careers in STEM, particularly engineering. Activities should spark interest. 1.  Engineering makes a world of difference,  2.  Engineering is essential to our health, happiness and safety.Help students gain the confidence to pursue careers in STEM, particularly in areas typically male gendered.Review these strategies, and have the counselors suggest more ways, write on board.
  • Each table will have a selection of cards with a scenario. (3) [See HANDOUTS] The teachers will practice using the knowledge and skills they’ve learned to come up with solutions for ways to introduce and counsel students and parents on careers in STEM. This will lead directly into their action plans at the end of the workshop.
  • Ask a few groups that selected scenario X to share.Challenge them to relate to awareness, interest, and confidence
  • Ask a few groups that selected scenario X to share.Challenge them to relate to awareness, interest, and confidence
  • Ask a few groups that selected scenario X to share.Challenge them to relate to awareness, interest, and confidence
  • Should be 9:30.Well done! Excellent work. Thanks for your participation. We are now going to move on to the next portion of the workshop.
  • Whitney Darrow, Jr. (August 22, 1909 – August 10, 1999) was a prominent American cartoonist, who worked most of his career for The New Yorker, with some 1,500 of his cartoons printed in his nearly 50-year-long career with the magazineThis book: I’m Glad I’m a Boy! I’m glad I’m a Girl was published in 1970. Let it be noted that Darrow was a satirist, however this book was widely circulated, popular, and representative of the period.
  • Comical interjection: This is to highlight where we’ve come from as a society… and emphasize where we are going. Gender bias is a deeply rooted issue that will continue to permeate our society until we train up our children to not perpetuate stereotypes. In 2008 , across 62 reporting federal law enforcement agencies there were about 90,000 sworn officers, of whom approximately 18,200 (20%) were womenAccording to the Federal Aviation Administration, of the nearly 600,000 active pilots in the United States, approximately six percent are womenDuring the past 3 decades the proportion of physicians who are female has risen from 8 percent to nearly one in three physicians.  Recent trends suggest that within the next 2 decades women will constitute nearly half the physician workforce. <10% of nurses are male. (5.4% as of 2000)What about teachers, counselors?Source: U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, as cited in the Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Tables 603 and 1047 <http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/>http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/wle8708.pdf http://www.wai.org/about.cfmhttp://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/physicianworkforce/female.htm
  • C1970: A survival manual for the girl who wants it all:Why shouldn't a girl have everything: career, husband, children, and a fascinating social life.Address Gender bias in the workplace, still exists today. Share personal experience?
  • These researchers discovered that nation-level implicit stereotypes predicted nation-level sex differences in 8th-grade science and mathematics achievement. They suggest that implicit stereotypes and sex differences in science participation and performance are mutually reinforcing[48]. The findings suggest that a nation’s average implicit stereotyping (and not explicit) is uniquely related to gender inequality in science and math achievement and, by extension, to other markers of a diverse scientific workforce such as interest, participation, and presence in scientific leadership. Experimental research has frequently demonstrated causal effects of implicit stereotypes on such inequalities, and suggests that observation of inequalities can influence stereotypes[48].Luckily, stereotypes, bias, and other cultural beliefs can change; often the very act of identifying a stereotype or bias begins the process of dismantling it.Refer to link on resources site to take gender-science, gender-career IAT.So, DOES BIAS STILL EXIST?
  • No need to say the words on the slide: say this Why so few: p38: A large body of experimental research has found that negative stereotypes affect women’s and girls’ performance and aspirations in math and science through a phenomenon called “stereotype threat.” Even female students who strongly identify with math—who think that they are good at math and being good in math is important to them—are susceptible to its effects (Nguyen & Ryan, 2008). Stereotype threat may help explain the discrepancy between female students’ higher grades in math and science and their lower performance on high-stakes tests in these subjects, such as the SAT-math (SAT-M) and AP calculus exam. Additionally, stereotype threat may also help explain why fewer girls than boys express interest in and aspirations for careers in mathematically demanding fields. Girls may attempt to reduce the likelihood that they will be judged through the lens of negative stereotypes by saying they are not interested and by avoiding these fields.Why so few, p 22: A belief that one can succeed in a STEM field is important but is not the only factor in establishing interest in a STEM career. Culturally prescribed gender roles also influence occupational interest (Low et al., 2005). A review of child vocational development by Hartung et al. (2005) found that children—and girls especially— develop beliefs that they cannot pursue particular occupations because they perceive them as inappropriate for their gender.Strong implicit biases associated with gender and science influence early socialization and perpetuate gender stereotypes. Persistence: in order to persist in a male dominated field, a female must be very confident and reslilient. Equates to high attrition rate in undergrad, and perhaps the workplace. Areas where consistent gender differences have emerged are children’s and adolescents’ beliefs about their abilities in math and science, their interest in math and science, and their perceptions of the importance of math and science for their futures. (Halpern 2007 – Enc Boys & Girls)Girls are more likely to choose courses and careers in math and science if their interest in these fields is sparked and cultivated throughout the school years. Wigfield2006Awareness, Interest, Confidence1. U.S. Department of Education - National Center for Education Statistics. 2005 NAEP High School Transcript Study. February 2010 12 November 2010]; Available from: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/hsts/.2. College Board. Program Summary Report. 2009; Available from: http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/program-summary-report-09.pdf.3. Campbell, D.M. and e. al., Trends in Advanced Placement Science and Mathematics Test-Taking Among Female Students in California: A Latent Variable Approach. Electronic Journal of Science Education, 2009. 13(2): p. 62-82.
  • In studies of high mathematics achievers, women are more likely to secure degrees in the humanities, life sciences, and social sciences than in math, computer science, engineering, or the physical sciences; the reverse is true for menMost people do not view STEM occupations as directly benefiting society or individuals. As a result, STEM careers often do not appeal to women (or men) who value making a social contribution.Research shows that girls and young women lose interest in the fields of study leading to engineering careers by the time they enter college. Even academically prepared girls capable of pursuing engineering in college often don’t consider it as an option.Women are severely under-represented in the engineering profession. Currently only 18.6 percent of engineering undergraduates are women. Only 11% of the engineering work force is women. In today’s schools, equity is not the same as equality. Rather than equal treatment, equity may mean differential treatment and opportunities in order to compensate for one groups’ lack of experience, skills, knowledge, or confidence (Kahle 1996)Barbie has come a long way since 1992, when the blond doll was programmed to say, “Math class is tough.” Computer engineer will be the 126th career for Barbie, who turned 50 last year. For the first time, Mattel, which makes the doll, asked people to vote for her career, choosing among computer engineer, architect, environmentalist, news anchor and surgeon. PreviousI can be… Barbies: pizza chef, babysitter, preschool teacher, rockstar, ballroom dancer, news anchor, bride, ballerina, kitty vet, baby doctor, and NOW… computer engineer.Consider the images children and teens receive that reinforce negative stereotypes and gender roles… perpetuating bias in our culture/society. I am not an expert in pop culture, but what are some of the STEM stereotypes that our children and youth see in the media?Image source: http://shop.mattel.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4032107
  • It is first important to note that This is not a gender war! It is a very complex issue, with many contributing factors. Some say the issue is a leaky pipeline… that we are losing potential STEM participants along the way. Others say it is the chilly climate, or STEM environments (ie Man’s world) that discourage women from entering STEM & staying. Fact of the matter is: Gender stereotypes about gender roles in STEM areas may encourage girls to feel anxious and less confident, and choose not to pursue or persist in STEM fields, particularly engineering, and technology. We MUST Attract and retain more women in the STEM workforce to maximize innovation, creativity, and competitiveness.
  • Image: http://www.momlogic.com/2009/06/gender_bias_in_middle_school_charles_orlando.php Refer to worksheet on 7 forms of bias, David Sadker
  • Halpern, D., et al., Encouraging Girls in Math and Science. IES Practice Guide. NCER 2007-2003. National Center for Education Research, 2007: p. 55.
  • Allow participants about 5 minutes for TPS. Then invite them to share with their colleagues at their table. (Counselors may have sensitive issues that they are uncomfortable sharing with the ENTIRE group.)
  • Should be 9:30.Well done! Excellent work. Thanks for your participation. We are now going to move on to the next portion of the workshop.
  • There is a guide for participants to use in the worksheet folder.
  • Image: http://blogs.southtownstar.com/money/2008/12/the_value_of_gratitude.html
  • From NAE Technically Speaking Ask: What Is Technology?Explain: In its broadest sense, technology is the process by which humans modify nature to meet their needs and wants. However, most people think of technology only in terms of its artifacts: computers and software, aircraft, pesticides, water-treatment plants, birth-control pills, and microwave ovens, to name a few. But technology is more than its tangible products. An equally important aspect of technology is the knowledge and processes necessary to create and operate those products, such as engineering know-how and design, manufacturing expertise, various technical skills, and so on. Technology also includes all of the infrastructure necessary for the design, manufacture, operation, and repair of technological artifacts, from corporate headquarters and engineering schools to manufacturing plants and maintenance facilities.
  • ASK: What Is Technological Literacy?EXPLAIN: Technological literacy encompasses three interdependent dimensions— knowledge, ways of thinking and acting, and capabilities. Like literacy in reading, mathematics, science, or history, the goal of technological literacy is to provide people with the tools to participate intelligently and thoughtfully in the world around them. The kinds of things a technologically literate person must know can vary from society to society and from era to era. ASK: Why Technological Literacy?EXPLAIN: Individuals and the country as a whole would benefit greatly from a higher level of technological literacy. For one thing, people at all levels of society would be better prepared to make well-informed decisions on matters that affect, or are affected by, technology. A technologically literate public would generate a more abundant supply of technologically savvy workers who would be more likely to have the knowledge and abilities—and find it easier to learn the skills they need—for jobs in today’s technology-oriented workplaces. To the extent the study of technology encourages students to pursue scientific or technical careers, then improving our technological literacy would also lessen our dependence on foreign workers to fill jobs in many sectors.From NAE Technically Speaking
  • Business is 2nd @ ~15%Liberal Arts ~10%Economics ~10%Accounting ~7%
  • Former Dallas Cowboys Coach Tom Landry (1952 BSIE) was a graduate of the UH Cullen College of Engineering. Although most people still associate Landry with the University of Texas—because he played college football there as an undergraduate—Landry was also a UH graduate. Between 1966 and 1983, the Cowboys advanced to the NFL playoffs 17 times in 18 seasons, appeared in five Super Bowls and won two world championships. In the early years of the expansion Cowboys, between 1960 and 1965, Landry’s teams were often over-matched by superior talent. Landry responded by creating new schemes for offense and defense that altered the game of football itself.“He was not one of these ‘run-to-the-ball’ guys,” Landry Jr. says. “He had a system, and the flex defense, which we ran so well in the seventies and the sixties, was a very complicated defense. Players couldn’t let emotion take over because if they started running around outside the scheme, the defense wouldn’t work. Each player had to be in the right place. But once it worked, it was coordinated in a way that it could stop anybody.”By the mid 1960s, Landry had revolutionized the scouting and drafting of players by employing computers to analyze and detect players with the greatest potential, as well as talent and ability. Other teams in the league eventually adopted the same methods.
  • Ask the questions.Allow counselors to respond. Make sure to guide them to all forms of bias and stereotypes for both sexes. This is to get a feel for their level of understanding and potential bottlenecksGender bias: tendencyorinclination to unfairly cause partiality or favoritism
  • What kind of education does an engineer have?
  • How can you use real life examples to introduce engineering to your students?
  • • Sustaining the U.S. capacity for technological innovation.A better understanding of engineering would educate policy makers and the public as to how engineering contributes to economic development, quality of life, national security, and health.• Attracting young people to careers in engineering. A betterunderstanding of engineering should encourage students to take higher level math and science courses in middle school, thus enabling them to pursue engineering education in the future. This is especially important for girls and underrepresented minorities, who have not historically been attracted to technical careers in large numbers.• Improving technological literacy. To be capable, confidentparticipants in our technology-dependent society, citizens must know something about how engineering and science, among other factors, lead to new technologies (NAE and NRC, 2002).societal cues and environmental factors
  • [From Workshop 5 Handout]
  • Duffy, R. and W. Sedlacek (2009). "What is most important to students' long-term career choices: analyzing 10-year trends and group differences." Journal of Career Development 34(2): 149-163.
  • Duffy, R. and W. Sedlacek (2009). "What is most important to students' long-term career choices: analyzing 10-year trends and group differences." Journal of Career Development 34(2): 149-163.
  • http://www.bls.gov/oco/oco2003.htmPredictions for 2008-2010
  • Careers in Science, Math, and Engineering

    1. 1. 30 November 2010<br />Careers in <br />Science & Math<br />Meagan Ross<br />Ph.D. Student <br />Engineering Education<br />Purdue University<br />Tegwin Pulley<br />Strategic Planning & Diversity<br />Women of TI Fund<br />A partnership with the Dallas Women’s Foundation<br />
    2. 2. Pre-survey is in your packet on yellow paper<br />After you’ve finished your Survey, <br />Flip through a magazine &select any images or articles that you feel have any relation to ScienceTechnology Engineering orMath<br />Activity<br />
    3. 3. Science, Technology, <br />Engineering & Math <br />….EVERYWHERE!<br />Discussion<br />
    4. 4. 30 November 2010<br />Careers in <br />Science & Math<br />Meagan Ross<br />Ph.D. Student <br />Engineering Education<br />Purdue University<br />Tegwin Pulley<br />Strategic Planning & Diversity<br />Women of TI Fund<br />A partnership with the Dallas Women’s Foundation<br />
    5. 5.
    6. 6. Objectives <br />You will be able introduce and counsel students (and parents) on careers in SteM<br />You will be able to recognize and address gender bias and stereotypes<br />You will develop a plan to introduce students and inform parents of careers in SteM<br />
    7. 7. Agenda<br />
    8. 8. Status<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />STEM is necessary for sustaining US capacity and global competition for technological innovations<br />
    9. 9. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />What is Engineering?<br />Engineers make a world of difference and help shape the future <br />Engineering is essential to our health, happiness & safety<br />Engineers are creative & collaborative problem-solvers <br />REVIEW<br />
    10. 10. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Mechanical<br />Civil<br />Environmental<br />Chemical<br />Electrical<br />CEO<br />Coach<br />Doctor<br />Patent <br />Lawyer<br />Finance, Marketing& Sales<br />
    11. 11. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Name that Career!<br />As we review career opportunities in science & math, try to connect your magazine items to a career. Note themes of health, happiness, and safety.<br />Activity<br />
    12. 12. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Science Careers<br />A biologist could…<br />
    13. 13. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Science Careers<br />A chemist could…<br />
    14. 14. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Science Careers<br />An environmental scientist could…<br />
    15. 15. Math Careers<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />A mathematician could…<br />
    16. 16. Math Careers<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />An actuary could…<br />
    17. 17. Math Careers<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />A statistician could…<br />
    18. 18. Careers in STEM<br />You can learn:<br />Link on resource site<br />subjects to study in high school<br />degree required<br />median salary<br />projected job growth<br />overview<br />read interviews<br />
    19. 19. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Name that Career!<br />What themes of health, happiness, and safety among these careers did you recognize?<br />Discussion<br />
    20. 20. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Name that Career!<br />What careers did you identify from your magazine items?<br />Discussion<br />
    21. 21. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Name that Career!<br />What have you learned about careers in Science & Math? <br />Discussion<br />
    22. 22. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Work Values<br />White <br />females<br />African Amer.<br />African Amer.<br />Asian<br />Asian<br />males<br />Latino/a<br />How can STEM careers appeal to all students?<br />
    23. 23. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Approximately 50% of middle school students indicate that they do not plan to take mathematics and science courses beyond what their schools require. <br />However, the same students indicate that they would be interested in going to college, and taking college-level mathematics courses. <br />
    24. 24. Strategies<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />for Introducing Students to Careers in STEM<br />Use common technology artifacts to initiate conversations (food packaging, office supplies, electronics) to introduce STEM careers.<br />Use the environment around you (construction sites, news articles, healthcare, etc.) as tools to introduce importance & value of STEM careers.<br />Connect students with mentors or host guest speakers. (DFW-STEC)<br />Take advantage of course selection conversations to navigate students toward STEM careers.<br />Talk to parents about encouraging their children to consider STEM careers. <br />Awareness<br />Interest<br />Confidence<br />Application<br />
    25. 25. Role Play<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Objective: You will be able to introduce and counsel students (and parents) on careers in STEM<br />Using the strategies you’ve learned, role play with a neighbor with one of the scenarios on your table. <br />Activity<br />
    26. 26.
    27. 27.
    28. 28.
    29. 29. Objectives <br />You will be able introduce and counsel students (and parents) on careers in SteM<br />You will be able to recognize and address gender bias and stereotypes<br />You will develop a plan to introduce students and inform parents of careers in SteM<br />
    30. 30. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />1970<br />
    31. 31. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />F: 20% <br />F: 6%<br />F: 30%<br />M: 8%<br />
    32. 32. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />C1970: <br />A survival manual for the girl who wants it all<br />Why shouldn't a girl have everything: career, husband, children, and a fascinating social life.<br />
    33. 33. Implicit bias<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />About 70% of more than half a million Implicit Association Tests completed by citizens of 34 countries revealed expected implicit stereotypes associating science with males more than with females<br />Implicit stereotype = gender inequality<br />
    34. 34. Girls<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />In Math & Science<br />Girls earn more credits in math & science courses than boys<br />Female high school graduates have a higher combined GPA in math & science courses than boys<br />In 2009, 55 percent of AP test-takers were girls, but in STEM-related areas on 41%<br />While more females are participating in AP math & science, they are not performing at the levels of their male counterparts<br />Awareness<br />Interest<br />Confidence<br />Application<br />
    35. 35. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Gender Gap in Engineering<br />Remaining steady over the past two decades, only 18.6% of undergraduate engineering students are women.<br />In the workforce, only 1/10 engineers is a woman.<br />Computer Engineer <br />2010 Barbie Doll<br />
    36. 36. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Leaky Pipeline<br />vs.<br />Chilly Climate<br />Attracting and retaining more women in the STEM workforce will maximize innovation, creativity, and competitiveness<br />
    37. 37. Forms of Bias<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Invisibility- 1<br />Stereotyping- 2<br />Unreality- 3<br />Imbalance and Selectivity- 4<br />Fragmentation & Isolation- 5<br />Linguistic Bias- 6 <br />Cosmetic Bias- 7<br />
    38. 38. Strategies<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />strategies to <br />encourage females in STEM<br />teaching females students that success in mathematics and science is not based on innate ability<br />increasing exposure of female students to successful female mathematicians and scientists<br />providing “prescriptive, informational feedback” <br />creating classroom environments that engage and create lasting interest in science and math<br />Have girls recruit girls: attain a critical mass <br />Emphasize usefulness and relevance<br />Start early and young<br />Application<br />
    39. 39. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Think – Pair – Share<br />Objective: <br />You will be able to recognize <br />and address gender bias and stereotypes.<br />Share a time you experienced or observed gender bias or stereotyping in STEM. Using the strategies you’ve learned, discuss ways you can address this in the future.<br />Activity<br />
    40. 40. Objectives <br />You will be able introduce and counsel students (and parents) on careers in SteM<br />You will be able to recognize and address gender bias and stereotypes<br />You will develop a plan to introduce students and inform parents of careers in SteM<br />
    41. 41. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Implementation<br />Objective: You will be able to develop a plan to<br />introduce students and inform parents of STEM careers<br />Using the strategies you’ve learned, and working with your colleagues, develop a plan to introduce STEM careers to your students, and/or inform parents of how to help guide their children in STEM career preparation.<br />Activity<br />
    42. 42. Survey<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />As you are wrapping up your action plan, please begin the post-survey. <br />Pass it in when you are finished.<br />For information on the purpose of this assessment, please see your handout. <br />–Thank you<br />Survey<br />
    43. 43. Objectives <br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />You will be able introduce and counsel students (and parents) on careers in SteM<br />You will be able to recognize and address gender bias and stereotypes<br />You will develop a plan to introduce students and inform parents of careers in SteM<br />REVIEW<br />
    44. 44. Engineering makes a world of difference<br />Career exploration and planning for STEM careers is important<br />Gender bias exists & hurts students<br />Enduring Understandings<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />REVIEW<br />
    45. 45. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Questions?<br />Discussion<br />
    46. 46. Request speakers<br />Janet Butler<br />jbutler@dfwstec.orgwww.destinationdigital.org<br />
    47. 47. BACKUP <br />Extra slides<br />
    48. 48. Technological Literacy<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />What is <br />TECHNOLOGY?<br />Technology is the process by which humans modify nature to meet their needs and wants.<br />
    49. 49. Technological Literacy<br />SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />What is <br />Technological Literacy?<br />the goal of technological literacy is to provide people with the tools to participate intelligentlyand thoughtfullyin the world around them<br />
    50. 50. Engineers <br />make a world of <br />difference and help<br /> shape the future<br />Example<br />
    51. 51. The most common undergraduate degree among Fortune 500 CEOs is Engineering.<br />1 in 5 CEOs have an engineering degree.<br />Engineers <br />make a world of <br />difference and help<br /> shape the future<br />Source: Spencer Stuart <br />2005 Report<br />Example<br />
    52. 52. Tom Landry<br />Industrial Engineer<br />Engineers <br />make a world of <br />difference and help<br /> shape the future<br />Example<br />
    53. 53. SteM Careers, Preparing Students<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />Implementation<br />Survey<br />Questions & Closing<br />Gender Bias & Stereotypes<br />What are some gender biases & stereotypes?<br />Discussion<br />
    54. 54. How do engineers think?<br />Engineering <br />Design Process<br />Engineersare creative and <br />collaborative <br />problem-solvers <br />Boston <br />Museum Of Science<br />
    55. 55. Average starting salary offers for engineers<br />Engineersare creative and <br />collaborative <br />problem-solvers <br />Source: 2009 survey by the <br />National Association of Colleges and Employers<br />
    56. 56. Engineers make a world of difference and help shape the future <br />How can you use real life <br />Examples to introduce engineering <br />to your students?<br />Application<br />
    57. 57. Why do we care <br />about the gender gap <br />in engineering?<br />Gender gap<br /> in Engineering<br />Discussion<br />
    58. 58. Scenarios<br />Zoe<br />Maura<br />Rebecca<br />Gender bias<br /> in the classroom<br />Activity<br />
    59. 59. Strategies<br />Start early and young. <br />Have girls recruit girls: attain a critical mass. <br />Emphasize usefulness and relevance. <br />Use role models. <br />Revisit curriculum and teaching styles. <br />Teach the parents. <br />Teach other teachers and staff. <br />Do it again next year. <br />Closing the <br />gap in engineering<br />Application<br />
    60. 60. References<br />mail@MeaganPollock.com<br />Closing the <br />gap in engineering<br />
    61. 61. Resources to help you<br />List of resources that they can use to advise students.<br />Closing the <br />gap in engineering<br />
    62. 62.
    63. 63.
    64. 64. high<br />Capabilities<br />low<br />limited<br />poorly developed<br />highly <br />developed<br />Knowledge<br />Ways of <br />Thinking & Acting<br />extensive<br />

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