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Fhf pbis 09v2
 

Fhf pbis 09v2

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Families can improve the effectiveness of school-based PBIS by understanding their school's model and implementing parallel practices in the home.

Families can improve the effectiveness of school-based PBIS by understanding their school's model and implementing parallel practices in the home.

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  • Ask participants to think about their child’s school climate and district’s discipline policy. What do they like? What worries them? Give them time to list their ideas. Facilitate discussion of their ideas.
  • Reactive strategies include these types of responses. Note, they are only applied after there is trouble. They do little or nothing to prevent trouble. There is considerable evidence that most of these strategies do not have a lasting effect on behavior.
  • The outcome of reactive approaches to school discipline often look like this.
  • Children who are excluded from school because of discipline problems cannot learn academic or behavioral skills. This loss of learning bears long-term costs. Performance on high-stakes exams suffers placing children at-risk of grade level retention.
  • Total student losses Grade 7 - 12. DCR reports this as about 5% based upon total student population (K-12). Higher values represent percentage of students 7-12 that drop out.
  • Individuals with a BA/BS earn twice what a high school drop out earns annually. Over a lifetime (55 years) this could amount to an increased income of $1,188,000.
  • We must change what we are doing if we want to see a different result.
  • Engage: Interlock with; to bind; to pledge oneself. Bridges, rather than barriers at the boundaries can increase a student’s chances of successfully navigating sometimes divergent systems - Sheridan, S. M. (2003) How can we use SWPBS principles to interlock systems to support children?

Fhf pbis 09v2 Fhf pbis 09v2 Presentation Transcript

  • School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports Prepared by Michael Welch, SSP, NCSP Louisiana State University in Shreveport Prepared for Families Helping Families Region 7 Effective behavior strategies at school and at home
    • Why SWPBS?
    • What is SWPBS?
    • SWPBS: Effective Behavior Strategies at School and Home
    • Think about your child’s current school climate and discipline policies?
      • What pleases you?
      • What concerns you?
      • What can you do to impact school climate?
    5 4 3 2 1
    • What concerns me is that popular policies often are overly reliant on reactive and punitive strategies
    “ Traditionally, the national response to discipline in the schools has been reactive, in the form of punitive measures instead of preventive or effective practices” Walker & Terry, 1994, p. 216.
  • Suspension Paddling Office Referral Counseling Punishment Arrest
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    • School discipline problems impair teaching and learning opportunities
      • Children lose instruction
      • Lost instruction leads to lost potential
    • We can and must change school climate and discipline
    • We all have a stake and a role in improving school climate and discipline
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Suspensions
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Suspensions
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Suspensions
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Suspensions
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Percent of students at or above Basic level
  • Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx Percent of students at or above Basic level
  • Percent of students in grades 7 - 12 who drop out Louisiana State Department of Education: District Composite Report: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/pair/1613.aspx
  • National Center for Education Statistics: The Condition of Education 2009 - http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2009/section2/indicator17.asp
    • “ Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result”
            • Albert Einstein
    • Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them
            • Albert Einstein
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    • Proactive
      • Establish Expectations
        • What behaviors are needed for success?
      • Teach Expected Behaviors
        • Ensure child can perform the behavior
      • Reinforce Positive Performance
  • CPR 2 Linwood Middle School Expectations by Setting Matrix Settings & Expected Behaviors Expectation Cafeteria Rules Hall Rules Commons Rules Restroom Rules Bus Area Rules Cooperative Stand in a single file line. Keep your area clean. Dispose of all items in the proper place. Walk facing forward. Stay to the right. Move quickly to the designated area and stay there. Use the restroom and supplies properly & quickly. Walk quickly to your bus and enter orderly. Problem Solver Resolve conflicts quickly and peacefully. Resolve conflicts quickly and peacefully. Think of new ways to improve traffic flow. Resolve conflicts quickly and peacefully. Resolve conflicts quickly and peacefully. Report plumbing and cleanliness problems. Resolve conflicts quickly and peacefully. Responsible Wash your hands Move forward when it is your turn. Food remains inside. Follow dress code. Walk quickly to your destination. Be on time to all classes. Follow dress code. Respond quickly to the bell and the direction of duty personnel. Follow dress code. Dispose of personal items properly. Adjust clothing to follow dress code before exiting. Go immediately to the bus area when the bell sounds. Enter the bus in a single file & take your seat. Dress code applies until you reach home. Respectful Stand behind last person in line. Use your 6-inch voice. Be polite to all cafeteria workers Use zero voice in the main hall and when directed to by teachers or duty personnel. Dispose of concession packaging in proper container. Keep hands, feet and objects to self Keep the area clear of graffiti and clean for yourself & your classmates. Follow all of the rules of the bus driver for the safety of yourself & your classmates.
  • 80% of Students ~15% ~5% Tertiary Prevention: Specialized, Individualized Systems for students with High-Risk Behavior Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings
    • Primary support systems - Home, School, & Community
      • When all are engaged children benefit!
    Sugai, G. (2004) Student Systems School Systems Family Systems
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      • One way to engage with the school is to extend PBS practices into the home.
      • Schools and parents working together as co-equal parties to provide behavioral guidance communicates Unity, Caring , and Safety . It enhances Continuity which predicts successful behavior outcomes.
    • Research conducted by staff of the Northwest Educational Development Laboratory states that some parent involvement programs have produced effects on student achievement "ten times as large as that of socioeconomic status”.
    “ Reducing the Dropout Rate” E. Gregory Woods ( 2001) Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
    • Get to know your school’s SWPBS practices
      • What expectations has your school selected?
        • Bulldogs
          • B e Prepared
          • A ct Responsibly
          • R espect Everyone
          • K eep Safe
  • 1. Expectation (Concept): Respect 2. Definition/Critical Attributes: To show concern or consideration: Behaviors that help people feel calmer, safer, friendlier, and more cooperative. 3. Examples: Listening to others 3. Non-Examples: Calling names 4. Activities to enhance concept development: Have child list and share behaviors that they think being respectful looks like. 5. Activities to check comprehension: Present examples and non-examples and ask child to identify which are/are not respectful. 6. Activities to extend concept development: Have child record and graph their respectful behavior each day. Reinforce success.
    • Similar routines between school and home
      • 5 difficult times for children during a day
          • At School - 1. Arrival, 2. Transitions, 3. Lunch, 4. Recess, 5. Dismissal
          • At Home - 1. Getting up, 2. Getting out in the morning, 3. Returning home, 4. Dinner, 5. Bed time.
    Breen, K., Downs, C., & Albamonte, S. (2004).
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  • Michael D. Welch Louisiana State University Shreveport Department of Psychology One University Place Shreveport, LA 71115 (318) 797-5143 [email_address]