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Chapter 7 powerpoint
 

Chapter 7 powerpoint

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Chapter 7 powerpoint Chapter 7 powerpoint Presentation Transcript

  • Social Influence Chapter 7
  • Factors for Persuasion
    • Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM):
    • 2 different routes persuasion works
        • Central route
        • Peripheral route
  • Use in the Media and Advertising
    • Central route –
      • Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPJpkgqLQ_M
    • Peripheral route –
      • Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8nJKa13sBo
    • Do you have any examples?
  •  
  • Say What? Say How? Say How Often?
    • Other factors that impact how persuasive a message is.
    • Repeated Exposure
      • Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEG4Q6BCX_4&feature=related
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79tMMFja-Fw&feature=PlayList&p=D289C0FD426BE73E&index=0&playnext=1
    • Counter-arguments:
      • Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzK6MqVG_PM
    • Emotional Appeal:
      • You tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvYb4BLIAQw&feature=PlayList&p=CF03D6817A58FF63&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=1
  • Persuasion: The Communicator and Context
    • Persuasive communicators are characterized by
      • credibility,
      • likeability,
      • trustworthiness,
      • attractiveness, and
      • similarity with their audiences.
    • Ex. Celebrities, health professionals and attractive individuals.
    • Music
    • Mood
    • Surprise!!
  • Are you a person who can’t say “no”?
    • High self-esteem vs. low self-esteem
    • Anxious individual vs. self-assured
    • Review examples of thoughts that impact why some can or cannot refuse an unreasonable request.
  • Sales Ploys
    • The Foot-in-the-Door
    • Low-Balling
    • Bait-and-Switch
    • Test you own ability to resist these ploys. Fill out the worksheet on page 239.
  • 3 Types of Group Influences
    • Obedience to Authority
    • Conformity
    • Mob mentality
  • Obedience to Authority
    • Psychologists have long been concerned with the nature of blind obedience. Why are so many people willing to commit crimes against humanity when they are ordered to do so?
      • People are more concerned by approval than their own morality.
    • Stanley Milgram also wondered about this and conducted an experiment to determine how many people would resist authority figures who made immoral requests.
  • Factors in Blind Obedience
    • Propaganda
    • Socialization
    • Lack of Social Comparison
    • Perception of legitimate authority
    • The foot-in-the-door technique
    • Inaccessibility of values
    • Buffers
  • Example of Propoganda
  • CONFORMITY
    • Conform: To change one’s attitudes or behaviors to adhere to social norms.
    • Social norms: Explicit and implicit rules that reflect social expectations and influence the ways people behave in social situations.
    • The tendency to conform to social norms.
  • CONFORMITY
    • The tendency to conform to social norms can be positive or maladaptive
    • Many like to think of themselves as non-conformists, but a classic study (with matching lines) by Solomon Asch demonstrated that we are more likely to conform than we think.
  • Factors Influencing Conformity
    • Belonging to a collectivist rather than an individualistic society
    • Desire to be liked by other members of the group
    • Low self-esteem
    • Social shyness
    • Lack of familiarity with the task
    • Group size
    • Social support
  • Mob Behavior
    • Deindividuation
    • Factors:
      • Anonymity
      • Diffusion of responsibility
      • Arousal due to noise and crowding
      • Attending to social norms of group rather than moral values.
    • Ex. Riots
  • Altruism and the Bystander Effect.
    • Altruism: Unselfish concern for the welfare of others. Altruism is characterized by helping behavior.
    • Bystander effect: The tendency for bystanders to fail to act to help a person in need.
  •  
  • The Helper: Who Helps?
    • Mood (good mood = more likely to help) and
    • Empathy
    • If they know the victim (more likely to help people they know)
    • Women more likely to help people in need
    • Race and identity impact as well.
  • The Victim: Who is Helped?
    • If victim is more similar to helper (ie. Dress)
    • Women more likely to be helped than men
    • People with more baby-faced features are more likely to be helped
    • Race and identity impact as well .
  • Assertiveness Activity
  • Steps to becoming more assertive
    • Self-Monitoring: Self-monitoring of social areas can help you pinpoint problem areas.
    • Confronting Irrational Beliefs: While monitoring behavior, pay attention to irrational beliefs that lead to unassertive or aggressive behavior.
    • Modeling: Much of our behavior is modeled after that of people we respect and admire. A therapist can help an individual mold their new behaviors.
    • Behavior Rehearsal: It is a good idea to try out new behaviors in non-threatening situations, such as before a mirror. This will accustom you to the sounds of assertive talk.