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Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
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Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
Chapter 1 Powerpoint2
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Chapter 1 powerpoint for PSYC 301

Chapter 1 powerpoint for PSYC 301

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  • 1.
    • Welcome to PSYC 301:
    • Psychology of Personal Development
    • Instructor: Marisa Mariano
    • Teacher’s Assistant: Alex De Guzman
  • 2. Psychology 301: Chapter 1 Challenges of Life Chapter 1
  • 3. “ Just Fine” - Mary J. Blige
    • Let it go…
    • Can’t let this thing called love get away from you
    • Feel free right now, going do what you want to do
    • Can’t let nobody take it away, from you, from me, from we
    • No time for moping around, are you kidding?
    • And no time for negative vibes, cause I’m winning
    • It’s been a long week, I put in my hardest
    • Gonna live my life, feels so good to get it right
    • So I like what I see when I’m looking at me
    • When I’m walking past the mirror
    • No stress through the night, at a time in my life
    • Ain’t worried about if you feel it
    • Got my head on straight, I got my mind right
    • I ain’t gonna let you kill it
    • ‘ you see I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just….
  • 4. “ Just Fine” (continued)
    • (Chorus)
    • Fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, ooooh
    • Fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, ooooh
    • Just fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, fine, oooh
    • You see I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just fine
    • Feels so good, when you’re doing all the things that you want to do
    • Get the best out of life, treat yourself to something new
    • Keep your head up high
    • In yourself, believe in you, believe in me
    • Having a really good time, I’m not complaining
    • And I’m still wear a smile if its raining
    • I got to enjoy myself regardless
    • I appreciate life, I’m so glad I got mine
    • So I like what I see when I looking at me
  • 5. “ Just Fine” (continued)
    • When I’m walking past the mirror
    • Ain’t worried about you and what you gonna do
    • I’m a lady so I must stay classy
    • Got to keep it hot, keep it together
    • If I want to get better
    • You see I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just…
    • (Repeat chorus)
    • I ain’t gon’ let nothing get in my way
    • No matter what nobody has to say
    • I ain’t gon’ let nothing get in my way
    • No matter what nobody has to say
  • 6. “ Just Fine” (continued)
    • Feels so good, when you’re doing all the things that
    • You want to do
    • Get the best out of life, treat yourself to something new
    • It’s a really good thing to say
    • That I won’t change my life, my life’s just fine
    • (Repeat chorus)
    • So I like what I see when I’m looking at me
    • When I’m walking past the mirror
    • No stress through the night, at a time in my life
    • Ain’t worried about if you feel it
    • Got my head on straight, I got my mind right
    • I ain’t gonna let you kill it
    • You see I wouldn’t change my life, my life’s just fine
    • (Repeat chorus)
  • 7. Why Psychology?
    • Because it is ideally suited to help us meet the challenges that we encounter in life.
    • Psychology is a scientific approach to the study of behavior and mental processes.
    • Psychology can be applied to our lives to help us adjust.
  • 8. What is Adjustment?
    • Adjustment (coping) is behavior that permits us to meet the demands of the environment.
    • People are not merely reactors to their environments. People are also actors who influence their surroundings. We act upon the environment to meet our needs and pursue our goals.
    • To achieve psychological fulfillment, we must act…not merely react. Adjustment allows us to grow as individuals.
  • 9. Nature versus Nurture
    • Psychologists are concerned with the degree to which our traits and behavior patterns reflect our nature (genetics) and our nurture (environment).
    • What do you think? Is biology our destiny? Or does the environment have more of an impact upon our behavior?
  • 10. Nature versus Nurture
    • It appears that genetic factors are involved in nearly all human traits and behavior.
    • Genes play a role in our response to stress, our levels of obesity and addictions to name a few.
    • However, genetic factors cause predispositions…not specific behavior patterns. Genetic factors interact with other factors such as learning experiences and personal choice to determine behaviors, disorders and traits.
  • 11. Activity:
    • “ What is challenging” worksheet
    • In the first chapter, we will hear about the stories of Beth, John, Maria, Lisa, and David, and the life challenges they face. Listed below are some common challenges that many individuals deal with on a daily basis. Have you considered which ones apply to you? Some can be regarded as concerns, some as hassles, some as crises, and some as openings for growth.
    • Try this: Skip any issues that do not concern you, but count the number of issues in the list below that are (1) issues you have had to adjust to and are examples of your growth, and (2) issues that remain a challenge.
  • 12. Homework
    • Review Syllabus and Course Outline!!
    • Sign Syllabus Contract
    • Begin reading Chapter 1
  • 13. “ Student Shock”
    • is a name given to the effects of an often overwhelming number of choices for a major field, severe stress, pressure to choose the right career (and major), and pressure to perform on today's college students.
    • Have any of you felt these pressures?
  • 14. Activity
    • Break up into pairs and explore these questions with each other.
      • How has “student shock” affected you?
      • Do you feel you have been pushed to grow up or take on too much responsibility too fast?
      • What are your biggest fears about the future?
      • How have you, or your classmates, attempted to cope with student shock and what suggestions might you have for others coping with this phenomenon.
      • How might such heavy demands to cope keep you, eventually, from growing?
  • 15. Youtube video
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEx7I31-iW8&feature=related
  • 16. Human Diversity
    • The nation now contains more kinds of people and more ways of doing and viewing things than most of us might imagine. One type of diversity is ethnicity.
    • Ethnic Groups: Groups of people who can be distinguished by characteristics such as their cultural heritage, common history, race and language.
  • 17. Who We Are Today
  • 18. 2050
  • 19. Gender
    • Gender is the state of being male or being female.
    • Gender is a psychosocial concept…not biological.
    • Historically, women have been discriminated against.
    • Not until recently have women in our culture been afforded the opportunity to earn a higher education.
  • 20. Female Ph.D. Recipients in Psychology
  • 21. Other Forms of Diversity
    • Ethnic/Racial Identity
    • Age
    • Physical Ability
    • Socioeconomic Class
    • Sexual Orientation
    • Religious differences
  • 22. Why study diversity?
    • Experiences of ethnic groups in the United States highlight the impact of social, political, and economic factors upon human behavior and development
    • To appreciate both the rich heritage and the historical struggles of various ethnic groups.
    • To help us better understand and fully appreciate the true extent of human behavior and mental processes.
    • To comprehend the dramatically changing ethnic composition of our society.
  • 23. Group Activity
    • Break up into seven groups
    • In your groups you will be given one of the forms of diversity.
    • Draw/write the diversity issues you feel these groups face in today’s society.
    • Each group will present to the class
  • 24. Homework
    • Continue to read Chapter 1.
    • New students: turn in syllabus contract on Wednesday, August 26 in class.
  • 25. You Tube:
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRo8N_ZNpjM
    • What were the themes that we heard in the song?
    • What were images that we saw that are related to diversity and critical thinking?
    • Why is it important to consider critical thinking when discussing diversity?
  • 26.
    • Now,
    • let’s revisit our personality test results…
  • 27. Be critical of…
    • Pseudosciences – A method or system that claims to have a scientific basis but does not, such as astrology. A false or sham science.
    • Barnum effect – “A good circus had a little something for everyone”. The tendency of people to accept over generalized descriptions of personality as accurate appraisals of their own personalities.
    • Examples: Astrology, self-help books, infomercials, talk shows, psychics, etc.
  • 28. Critical Thinking
    • Thoughtfully analyzing the statements and arguments of other people.
    • Examining definitions of terms, examining the assumptions behind arguments
    • Scrutinizing the logic with which arguments are developed
  • 29. Critical Thinking and adjustment
    • Why is it essential to your adjustment?
      • It will help you make decisions and choices.
        • Ex. Whether to vote for a politician.
      • It will help you learn more about yourself and others.
        • Ex. Whether your friend’s stories makes sense, whether to believe self-help books or things you hear on tv.
  • 30. Be wary of “Selective Perception”
      • is the natural process by which people pay attention to (and remember) things that feel good and that agree with their basic values and attitudes, and forget or blind themselves things that conflict with their basic beliefs or values.
    • this could affect both the researcher and the subject in the case study method or another research method.
    • Can you think of things that may be altered by Selective Perception?
    • It’s important to note how Selective Perception can alter our attitude and behavior towards things.
  • 31. Critical Thinking recap
    • Psychology is a science and provides us with a scientific approach to coping with the challenges of life. The scientific approach utilizes critical thinking.
    • Critical thinking is an approach to thinking characterized by skepticism and thoughtful analysis of statements and arguments—for example, probing arguments’ premises and the definition of terms.
  • 32. Critical Thinking
    • Critical thinking is essential to our adjustment as it allows us to critically evaluate our environment (arguments of a political candidate, whether a diet will work, whether someone is telling us the truth).
  • 33. Recap on Critical Thinking Skills
  • 34. Features of critical thinking
    • Maintain a healthy skepticism .
    • Exam the definition of terms.
    • Examine the assumptions or premises of arguments.
    • Be cautious in drawing conclusions from “evidence”.
    • Consider alternative interpretations of research evidence, especially of evidence that seems to show cause and effect.
    • Don’t oversimplify .
    • Don’t overgeneralize .
    • Apply critical thinking to all areas of life!!!
  • 35. Critical Thinking and Surfing
    • ANYONE can post information online.
    • Who is posting the material?
    • What are their credentials?
    • Trustworthy information comes from well-established scientific sources.
    • Let the Buyer Beware!
  • 36. Studying Adjustment
    • Psychologists use the scientific method to study adjustment issues.
    • Scientific method : A method for obtaining scientific evidence in which a hypothesis is formed and tested.
  • 37.  
  • 38. How Psychologists do Research.
    • We will cover various methods used:
      • Case-Study Method
      • Survey Method
      • Naturalistic-Observation Method
      • Correlational Method
      • Experimental Method
  • 39. Case-Study Method
    • research based on a carefully drawn biography obtained through interviews, questionnaires, or psychological tests.
    • Plus: allows researchers to better understand behavior
    • Weakness: the social desirability bias, which is a tendency for the person being studied to respond in socially desirable ways. (to learn about yourself, fill out the questionnaire on page 26)
  • 40. The Survey Method
    • gathering information from large numbers of individuals through interviewing or asking them to complete questionnaires in order to learn about their attitudes or behaviors.
    • often administered to samples and then the results are generalized to the larger population.
  • 41. Surveys and Random Sampling
    • Psycholgists use samples to represent target populations. If accurately represent, then they can generalize the results.
    • Sample - a segment of the population.
    • Random Sampling – sample drawn such that every member of a population has an equal chance of being selected.
    • Weakness: Need to be aware of accurate representation of target population and volunteer bias .
  • 42.  
  • 43. Naturalistic-Observation Method
    • A scientific method in which organisms are observed in their natural environments .
    • Strength : the ability to see “natural” behavior
    • Challenge: study using unobtrusive methods.
    • Unobtrusive methods - measures that do not interfere with a subject’s behavior.
  • 44. Correlational Method
    • A scientific method that studies the relationships between variables .
    • Correlation coefficient : A number between +1.00 to -1.00 that expresses the strength and direction (positive or negative) of the relationship between two variables.
    • Plus: shows relationships
    • Weakness: does not show cause and effect relationship between two variables.
  • 45.  
  • 46. The Experimental Method
    • seeks to confirm or discover cause-and-effect relationships by introducing independent variables and observing their effects on dependent variables .
    • Ex. Whether alcohol incites aggressive behavior.
  • 47. Experimental Method
    • Independent variable: A condition in a scientific study that is manipulated so that it’s effects my be observed.
    • Dependent variable: A measure of an assumed effect of an independent variable.
    • Experimental Group: A group of subjects who receive a treatment (independent variable).
    • Control Group: A group of subjects whose members don’t receive the treatment , while other conditions are held constant. Therefore, one may conclude that group differences following treatment will result from the treatment.
  • 48. Experimental Method (continued)
    • To address bias and increase validity and reliability of experiment. Psychologists use:
    • Random Assignment: A procedure for randomly assigning subjects to experimental or control groups.
    • Placebo: A bogus treatment that has the appearance of being genuine.
    • Double-blind studies: Experiments in which neither the subjects nor the researchers know who has been given the active treatment or drug and who has not.
  • 49. Experiment Example:
    • Double blind study on the effects of alcohol.
    • Used Vodka and Tonic Water that could not be discerned by taste
    • Recruited college men who described themselves as social drinkers
    • (refer to next slide)
  • 50.  
  • 51. Experiment results
    • Result 1: Men who believed they had drunk vodka responded more aggressively to a provocation than men who believed they had drunk tonic water only.
    • Result 2: Men who had drunk alcohol acted no more aggressively than men who had drunk tonic water only.
    • What does this mean?
    • Conclusion: Actual content of drink was immaterial it depended more on the person than the alcohol.
  • 52. An active approach to learning…
    • Research as taught us that an active approach to learning results in better grades than a passive approach.
    • What is active learning ?
  • 53. Active learning is…
    • Pacing yourself
    • Planning ahead
    • Studying different subjects each day
    • Being an active note taker
    • Expanding your attention span
    • Eliminate Distractions
    • Practice self-reward
    • Dedication! Stick with it!!
  • 54. SQ3R study method
    • One method that can help in mastering this textbook and material is SQ3R .
    • S = Survey – preview each chapter to get a sense of the topics and how chapter is organized.
    • Q = Question – Use the questions in the textbook as a guide to your reading; they highlight key issues and points. You can also generate additional questions for yourself to help you remember things.
  • 55. SQ3R study method (cont’)
    • R – Read – try to answer survey questions and make sure you understand key concepts before moving on.
    • R – Recite – Recite each answer outloud. This helps strengthen retention of material. Writing down can also help.
    • R – Review – Use the Module Review sections at the end and review your notes and materials throughout the week. Don’t cram right before the quiz!!
  • 56. End of Chapter 1
    • Any questions?
  • 57. Homework
    • For 1 week keep track of how you spend your time.
      • Use the time management sheet.
    • Form is due back on Monday, Wednesday, Sept. 9.

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