Ch08 principles of design

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Principles of Design

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Ch08 principles of design

  1. 1. Principles of Design
  2. 2. Principles of Design Balance Emphasis Proportion and ScaleRhythm and Repetition Unity and Variety
  3. 3. Leonardo da Vinci. Study of Human Proportion: The Vitruvian Man. c. 1492.
  4. 4. Frank Gehry residence. 1977–78.
  5. 5. BalanceSymmetricalAsymmetrical Radial
  6. 6. Symmetry Absolute Bilateral
  7. 7. Taj Mahal. Mughal period, c. 1632–48.
  8. 8. Enguerrand Quarton. Coronation of the Virgin. 1453–54. 72 x 86 5/8 in.
  9. 9. Asymmetrical Balance Balance can be achieved even when the two sides of the compositionlack symmetry, if they seem to possess the same visual weight.
  10. 10. Childe Hassam. Boston Common at Twilight. c. 1885-86. 42 x 60 in.,
  11. 11. Jan Vermeer. Woman Holding a Balance. c. 1664. 15 7/8 x 14 in., framed: 24 3/4 x 23 x 3 in.
  12. 12. Radial BalanceWhere everything radiates outward from a central point.
  13. 13. Rose window. Chartres Cathedral. c. 1215.
  14. 14. EmphasisArtists employ emphasis in order to draw the viewer’s attention to one area of the work.That area is called the focal point.
  15. 15. Anna Vallayer-Coster. Still Life with Lobster. 1781. 27 3/4 x 35 1/4 in.
  16. 16. Georges de La Tour. Joseph the Carpenter. c. 1645. 18 1/2 x 25 1/2 in.
  17. 17. Anselm Kiefer. Parsifal I. 1973. 127 7/8 x 86 1/2 in.
  18. 18. Fransisco Goya. The Third of May 1808. 1810-1812.
  19. 19. Radial BalanceWhere everything radiates outward from a central point. Jackson Pollock. Number 1. 1948.
  20. 20. Larry Poons. Orange Crush. 1963. 80 x 80 in.
  21. 21. Scale and Proportion Scale = used to describe the dimensions of an art object in relation to the original object that it depicts or in relation to the objects around it. Proportion = refers to the relationshipBetween the parts of an object and the whole, or to the relationship between an object and Its surroundings.
  22. 22. Do-Ho Suh. Public Figures. 1998–99. 10 x 7 x 9 ft.
  23. 23. Do-Ho Suh
  24. 24. Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. Spoonbridge and Cherry. 1988. 29 ft. 6 in. x 51 ft. 6 in. x 13 ft. 6 in.
  25. 25. Hokusai. The Great Wave off Kanagawa, from the series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji. 1823–29. 10 x 15 in.
  26. 26. Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Untitled. 1991.billboard dimensions vary with installation.
  27. 27. Polykleitos. Doryphoros. 450 BCE. height 84 in.
  28. 28. Parthenon. 447–438 BCE. 111 x 237 ft. at base.
  29. 29. Repetition and Rhythm Repetition = when we see the same thing over and over again. often implies monotonyRhythm = when the same or like elements are repeated over and over again in a composition, a certain visual rhythm will result.
  30. 30. Jacob Lawrence. Barber Shop. 1946. 21 1/8 x 29 3/8 in.
  31. 31. Laylah Ali. Untitled. 2000. 13 x 19 in.
  32. 32. Auguste Rodin. Gates of Hell with Adam and Eve. 1880–1917. 250 3/4 x 158 x 33 3/8 in.
  33. 33. Auguste Rodin. The Three Shades. 1881–86, posthumous cast authorized by Musée Rodin, 1980. 75 1/2 x 75 1/2 x 42 in.
  34. 34. Unity and VarietyUnity = An ordering of all elements in a work of art or literature so that each contributes to a unified aesthetic effect. Variety = The quality or condition of being various or varied; diversity.
  35. 35. James Lavadour. The Seven Valleys and the Five Valleys. 1988. 54 x 96 in.
  36. 36. Louise Lawler. Pollock and Tureen. 1984. 28 x 39 in.
  37. 37. Las Vegas, Nevada.

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