Media Life: Teaching & Pedagogy

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Slideshow documenting our approach to teaching massive (400+ students) lecture classes about the Media Life concept. This approach covers practical and pedagogical issues when teaching broad overview …

Slideshow documenting our approach to teaching massive (400+ students) lecture classes about the Media Life concept. This approach covers practical and pedagogical issues when teaching broad overview classes on related topics such as: (New) Media & Society, Introduction to (Mass) Communication and/or Media, Media Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication.

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  • Teaching Massive Classes - A T101 Media Life Case Study A Workshop by Mark Deuze - February 18, RTV 226, 12:30-1:45pm. Systems of higher education worldwide are growing rapidly: programs  consolidate, colleges diversify, and class sizes grow. Some speak of  the contemporary university as a 'edufactory', forcing students into  faceless and demeaning massive lecture halls where no serious work or  communication can take place. Teaching large (100+) or massive (400+) student classes is certainly  not easy. However, if you find a way to make it work, it can count as  highly marketable skill for your academic job application - and  empower you to provide meaningful and inspiring answers to what  arguably is one of the defining trends at universities and colleges in  the US and elsewhere: the massification of higher education. Over the last five years, faculty and graduate students have  transformed T101 Media Life - a University Division course with 420+  students offered every Fall and Spring semester - into a interactive,  technologically advanced, theoretically challenging, and altogether  fun event. In this T600 session, T101 Media Life is unpacked and its 'secrets'  will be revealed. The workshop will seek your thoughts, questions, and  input regarding things like: 1. Lectures - how we take attendance without taking attendance - how we interact with students in real-time while lecturing at the  same time - how we move beyond media literacy to go deep into media theory  without students even knowing it - how we encourage students to use all their media devices during  class and still lecture effectively - how we record, archive and share all the audio and video used  throughout the course. - how we have almost completely abandoned reading materials in favor  of visual storytelling and learning 2. Discussion Sections - how we have the discussion sections self-organize to add value to  the lectures - how we allow students to make media in order to understand media - how we co-author a handbook for associate instructors providing a  blueprint for each semester - how we have students collaboratively define every concept of the  course in 140 characters or less 3. Assignments and Exams - how we share the exam questions with students before the semester  starts - how we ask open-ended exam questions and still manage to grade all  exams in a single day - how we make assignments required and optional at the same time - how we allow students to create their own exams and study guide - how we get students to forget who they are in order to find  themselves in media 4. Grading - how we have finally abolished any kind of grading in the course - how we involve students in the evaluation of their own work Please note: after the presentation, all T101 materials (study guide,  syllabi, key concepts document, lecture slideshows, lecture audio  recordings, AI workbook) will be made available to anyone interested.
  • From a 2003 study, we can see that only does the average American (regardless of age, class or gender) spend about 11 hours PER DAY using media - but he or she also does not realize nor remember their media use most of the time. in the twenty-first century, we navigate through a vast mass media environment unprecedented in human history. Yet our intimate familiarity with the media often allows us to take them for granted. Media use has become: automatic.
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/20/education/20wired.html ML = praxeo-onto-epistemological, mediatic a priori, materiality & immateriality of media and so on (literature review): its all included; ML is as a POV the logical next step, and its simple: we live in, not with, media intellectual history: Harold Innes, Marshal McLuhan, …
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/20/education/20wired.html ML = praxeo-onto-epistemological, mediatic a priori, materiality & immateriality of media and so on (literature review): its all included; ML is as a POV the logical next step, and its simple: we live in, not with, media intellectual history: Harold Innes, Marshal McLuhan, …
  • What this means, is that we are all living inside our own TRUMAN SHOW, as the Jim Carrey character in the movie of that tile did: surrounded by omnipresent media, being recorded and monitored all the time, making and consuming media constantly, being connected to everyone else through increasingly digital, portable and networked media devices all the time - and unwilling or indeed unable to switch any of this off. The question now is: what skills and attitude do you need to cope with this kind of life? How do you survive inside your own Truman Show? THAT is what T101 is all about.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raoul_Vaneigem media life is a life where we observe ourselves live this in turn enables and powers a reflective position vis-à-vis our own behavior our argument is that this position should always be aesthetic and ethical, like the Bil’in/Avatar example: it is fun and seriously consequential at the same time. 4. and this is how we need to look at ourselves in order to be able to take responsibility for our desires
  • Syllabus!
  • Assignment 1-3: Personal Information Economy, Google Essay, Analysis of a Media Phenomenon
  • Assignment 1-3: Personal Information Economy, Google Essay, Analysis of a Media Phenomenon
  • Assignment 1-3: Personal Information Economy, Google Essay, History of Twitter
  • The research essay is basically a historical and critical analysis of a significant contemporary media phenomenon. In this assignment, you pick a contemporary breakthrough online phenomenon and put it in historical context (who invented the technology and what preceded this digital phenomenon, how it evolved and how its use spread), in technological context (how does the technology work? what does it allow you to do? does the technology have flaws or drawbacks? what do you use the technology for?), in cultural context (how does this technology influence your life and others' life?), and possibly in policy context (are there legal and/or ethical problems associated with the technology? is the use of this digital communication technology regulated? how?). Be careful to clearly discuss all these four contexts when reporting on your research.
  • Assignment 5: creative assignment:http://www.youtube.com/t101medialife Student Videos: http://www.youtube.com/my_playlists?p=DA46A8C474D3ABD9
  • exam
  • exam
  • http://tel101medialife.wikia.com/wiki/Media_Life_Wiki
  • twitter.com/t101medialife
  • attendance video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwZhh5gOOWs Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/58851420@N07/ Places: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Woodburn-Hall/127327130648125
  • discussion section: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nceWDUlMCo Mike's Media Life 2011
  • Teaching Massive Classes - A T101 Media Life Case Study A Workshop by Mark Deuze - February 18, RTV 226, 12:30-1:45pm. Systems of higher education worldwide are growing rapidly: programs  consolidate, colleges diversify, and class sizes grow. Some speak of  the contemporary university as a 'edufactory', forcing students into  faceless and demeaning massive lecture halls where no serious work or  communication can take place. Teaching large (100+) or massive (400+) student classes is certainly  not easy. However, if you find a way to make it work, it can count as  highly marketable skill for your academic job application - and  empower you to provide meaningful and inspiring answers to what  arguably is one of the defining trends at universities and colleges in  the US and elsewhere: the massification of higher education. Over the last five years, faculty and graduate students have  transformed T101 Media Life - a University Division course with 420+  students offered every Fall and Spring semester - into a interactive,  technologically advanced, theoretically challenging, and altogether  fun event. In this T600 session, T101 Media Life is unpacked and its 'secrets'  will be revealed. The workshop will seek your thoughts, questions, and  input regarding things like: 1. Lectures - how we take attendance without taking attendance - how we interact with students in real-time while lecturing at the  same time - how we move beyond media literacy to go deep into media theory  without students even knowing it - how we encourage students to use all their media devices during  class and still lecture effectively - how we record, archive and share all the audio and video used  throughout the course. - how we have almost completely abandoned reading materials in favor  of visual storytelling and learning 2. Discussion Sections - how we have the discussion sections self-organize to add value to  the lectures - how we allow students to make media in order to understand media - how we co-author a handbook for associate instructors providing a  blueprint for each semester - how we have students collaboratively define every concept of the  course in 140 characters or less 3. Assignments and Exams - how we share the exam questions with students before the semester  starts - how we ask open-ended exam questions and still manage to grade all  exams in a single day - how we make assignments required and optional at the same time - how we allow students to create their own exams and study guide - how we get students to forget who they are in order to find  themselves in media 4. Grading - how we have finally abolished any kind of grading in the course - how we involve students in the evaluation of their own work Please note: after the presentation, all T101 materials (study guide,  syllabi, key concepts document, lecture slideshows, lecture audio  recordings, AI workbook) will be made available to anyone interested.

Transcript

  • 1. T101 Media Life
    • Department of Telecommunications
    • University Division Course
  • 2. teaching massive lecture classes
  • 3.
    • T101 Media Life
    • so what? the learning goal
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 4. MEDIA LIFE: the point of it all
  • 5. concurrent media exposure
  • 6. media using is media making
  • 7.
    • Dr. Michael Rich, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Boston who directs the Center on Media and Child Health, said that with media use so ubiquitous, it was time to stop arguing over whether it was good or bad and accept it as part of the children’s environment, “like the air they breathe, the water they drink and the food they eat.”
    January 20, 2010
  • 8.
    • Dr. Michael Rich, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Boston who directs the Center on Media and Child Health, said that with media use so ubiquitous, it was time to stop arguing over whether it was good or bad and accept it as part of the children’s environment, “ like the air they breathe , the water they drink and the food they eat.”
    January 20, 2010
  • 9.  
  • 10. “ Whoever discovered water, it almost certainly wasn’t a fish.”
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13. MEDIA
  • 14.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 18. assignments: optional, menu-based, creative
  • 19. the autobiographical essay
  • 20.  
  • 21. the personal information economy essay
  • 22. the research paper
  • 23. the creative work: http://www.youtube.com/t101medialife
  • 24.  
  • 25.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 26. midterm and final exams
  • 27. color-coding the exams
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 34. T101 Media Life XP and Star Systems
    • Discussions: 10 XP (each)
    • Group Debate: 0 to 50 XP
    • Assignments: 0 to 110 XP
    • Exams: 0 to 20 XP per question
    • Research Participation 50 XP
    • Pop Quiz 10 XP (each)
    • Creative Work: 10 XP (each)
    • Multivisions: 5 XP
    • Twitter: 0 to 20 XP
    • Yellow star = 1 to 8 ratings
    • Blue star = 9 to 15 ratings
    • Purple star = 16 to 19 ratings
    • Yellow shooting star = 20 ratings
  • 35. communal grading
  • 36.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 37. t101 twitter channel: http://twitter.com/t101medialife
  • 38.  
  • 39. visual storytelling: the story
  • 40. Fall 2005 T101 Living in the Information Age 122 Students, Section GPA: 2.810, Midterm: 75; Final: 77 Spring 2006 T101 Living in the Information Age 116 Students, Section GPA: 2.993, Midterm: 80; Final: 82 Fall 2006 T 101 Living in the Information Age 115 Students, Section GPA: 3.127, Midterm: 79; Final: 76 Spring 2008 T 101 Media Life 388 Students, Section GPA: 3.174, Midterm: 77; Final: 80 Fall 2008 T 101 Media Life 385 Students, Section GPA: 3.374, Midterm: 82; Final: 83 Spring 2009 T 101 Media Life 391 Students, Section GPA: 3.187, Midterm: 77; Final: 83 Fall 2009 T 101 Media Life 418 Students, Section GPA: 3.239, Midterm: 78; Final: 78 Spring 2010 T 101 Media Life 407 Students, Section GPA: 3.121, Midterm: 83; Final: 80
  • 41. Fall 2005 T101 Living in the Information Age 122 Students, Section GPA: 2.810, Midterm: 75; Final: 77 Spring 2006 T101 Living in the Information Age 116 Students, Section GPA: 2.993, Midterm: 80; Final: 82 Fall 2006 T 101 Living in the Information Age 115 Students, Section GPA: 3.127, Midterm: 79; Final: 76 Spring 2008 T 101 Media Life 388 Students, Section GPA: 3.174, Midterm: 77; Final: 80 Fall 2008 T 101 Media Life 385 Students, Section GPA: 3.374, Midterm: 82; Final: 83 Spring 2009 T 101 Media Life 391 Students, Section GPA: 3.187, Midterm: 77; Final: 83 Fall 2009 T 101 Media Life 418 Students, Section GPA: 3.239, Midterm: 78; Final: 78 Spring 2010 T 101 Media Life 407 Students, Section GPA: 3.121, Midterm: 83; Final: 80
  • 42.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 47.  
  • 48. version 1.0: Mark Deuze, Spencer Williams Stuart, Chase Bowen Martin version 2.0: Asta Zelenkauskaite, Venkata Ratnadeep Suri version 3.0: Sunitha Chitrapu, Moises Montenegro, Katie Birge, Kythaparampil Jacob Koruth version 4.0: Mark Bell, Laura Speers, Phoebe Elefante version 5.0: Travis Ross, Geoff Weiss, Linday Ems version 6.0:, Peter Blank, Siyabonga Africa
  • 49. engagement, participation, doing things
  • 50.
    • t101 media life
    • so what?
    • syllabus: contract
    • assignments: options
    • exams: open and wiki-based
    • grading without grading: the XP & star system
    • lectures: visual storytelling & the Twitter feed
    • taking attendance without taking attendance
    • discussion sections: making it work
    • lesson learned
  • 51. in (a) media life, media co-constitute the learning environment & experience
  • 52. BUSHY. Madam, your Majesty is too much sad. You promis'd, when you parted with the king, To lay aside life-harming heaviness, And entertain a cheerful disposition. QUEEN. To please the King, I did; to please myself I cannot do it; yet I know no cause Why I should welcome such a guest as grief, Save bidding farewell to so sweet a guest As my sweet Richard: yet again methinks, Some unborn sorrow, ripe in fortune's womb, Is coming towards me, and my inward soul With nothing trembles; at some thing it grieves More than with parting from my lord the king. BUSHY. Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows, Which shows like grief itself, but is not so; For sorrow's eye, glazed with blinding tears, Divides one thing entire to many objects; Like perspectives which, rightly gaz'd upon, Show nothing but confusion; ey'd awry, Distinguish form: so your sweet Majesty, Looking awry upon your lord's departure, Find shapes of grief more than himself to wail; Which, look'd on as it is, is nought but shadows Of what it is not. Then, thrice-gracious Queen, More than your lord's departure weep not: more's not seen; Or if it be, 'tis with false sorrow's eye, Which for things true weeps things imaginary.
  • 53. BUSHY. Madam, your Majesty is too much sad. You promis'd, when you parted with the king, To lay aside life-harming heaviness, And entertain a cheerful disposition. QUEEN. To please the King, I did; to please myself I cannot do it; yet I know no cause Why I should welcome such a guest as grief, Save bidding farewell to so sweet a guest As my sweet Richard: yet again methinks, Some unborn sorrow, ripe in fortune's womb, Is coming towards me, and my inward soul With nothing trembles; at some thing it grieves More than with parting from my lord the king. BUSHY. Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows, Which shows like grief itself, but is not so; For sorrow's eye, glazed with blinding tears, Divides one thing entire to many objects; Like perspectives which, rightly gaz'd upon, Show nothing but confusion; ey'd awry, Distinguish form : so your sweet Majesty, Looking awry upon your lord's departure, Find shapes of grief more than himself to wail; Which, look'd on as it is, is nought but shadows Of what it is not. Then, thrice-gracious Queen, More than your lord's departure weep not: more's not seen; Or if it be, 'tis with false sorrow's eye, Which for things true weeps things imaginary.
  • 54. T101 Media Life
    • Department of Telecommunications
    • University Division Course