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Media History
 

Media History

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Media Life is a course intended for undergraduate students across campus. Its goal is to make people aware of the role that media play in their everyday life. The key to understanding a "media life" ...

Media Life is a course intended for undergraduate students across campus. Its goal is to make people aware of the role that media play in their everyday life. The key to understanding a "media life" is to see our lives not as lived WITH media (which would lead to a focus on media effects and media-centric theories of society), but rather IN media (where the distinction between what we do with and without media dissolves).

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  • New Media: PREJUDICE; utopia vs dystopia
  • What are people actually doing?
  • Web 2.0
  • www.bringtheloveback.com
  • key moments in media history
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • the 20th century's distinctive contribution to the interface between people and machines: JOYSTICK
  • the 20th century's distinctive contribution to the interface between people and machines: JOYSTICK
  • the 20th century's distinctive contribution to the interface between people and machines: JOYSTICK
  • the 20th century's distinctive contribution to the interface between people and machines: JOYSTICK
  • the 20th century's distinctive contribution to the interface between people and machines: JOYSTICK
  • Wii remote accidents…
  • Biggest moments in media history: 1950s REMOTE CONTROL; 1960s VCR (1990s: DVR); 1970s JOYSTICK & COMPUTER MOUSE: all put the user increasingly in the driver’s seat
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4kp9Ciy1nE On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90-minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session in the of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared-screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface.
  • Cells for mobile phone base stations were invented in 1947 by Bell Labs engineers at AT&T and further developed by Bell Labs during the 1960s; first cellular network in 1979 in Japan by NTT. The first "modern" network technology on digital 2G (second generation) cellular technology was launched by Radiolinja (now part of Elisa Group) in 1991 in Finland on the GSM standard
  • http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/05/the-evolution-of-cell-phone-design-between-1983-2009/
  • Increased user control & remediation
  • history
  • history
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQVuLpkKqno

Media History Media History Presentation Transcript

    • media history
    • recap: concurrent media exposure
    • recap: media are pervasive and ubiquitous
    • recap: media are remixed
    • utopian vs. dystopian views on media
    • “ new” media remediate “old” media
    • media today: where are we now, how did we get here?
    • structural trends in (new) media
  • ultimate remix media: culture jamming
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  • media today: where are we now?
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  • some observations on media today: urban, conversational, cacophony, branded content and experience
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  • media dilemma: provide content or build relationships?
  • media today: how did we get here?
  • baby steps: the remote control (1950s)
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  • the big leap: videorecording (1960s)
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  • a long time coming: the joystick (1970s)
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  • the computer mouse (1970s)
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  • and… the mobile phone (1980s)
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  • 1967: Cordless telephones enter the phone system. 1968: First digital wireless network, Linkabit , created in San Diego. 1970: FM stations target population segments, introducing "narrowcasting". 1971: Cellphone is invented. 1972: Polaroid camera can focus by itself. 1976: Sony's Betamax and JVC's VHS battle for home market. Sony will lose. 1978: Space Invaders , the first video game to reach mainstream public. 1979: News groups arrive on the Internet 1979: Sony Walkman tape player starts a fad. 1981: The laptop computer is introduced by Tandy. 1982: Pac-Man attracts girls as well as boys to home video games. 1983: Audio music cassettes outsell LP records. 1984: Portable compact disc player arrives. 1986: Japanese introduce Game Boy , with 8-bit operating system. 1988: Jarkko Oikarinen writes Internet Relay Chat software program. 1989: Vacationers can buy single use, throwaway cameras. 1991: 3 out of 4 U.S. homes own VCRs 1992: Text-based browser opens World Wide Web for general usage. 1993: Nokia sends text messages between mobile phones. 1996: The shooter game Quake allows users to create their own levels. 1997: The first weblogs, or ‘blogs’ 1997: From Kodak, the first point-and-shoot digital camera.
  • 1998: Music industry up in arms as fans download MP3 sound files for free. 1998: Sony's Everquest multiplayer online game attracts thousands worldwide. 1998: Net users are judges of a TV sports event: world champion ice skating. 1999: Also at the movies: The Matrix 2000: 3G (3rd generation) licenses sold for wireless internet. 2001: Personal headsets display movies, video games, spreadsheets. 2001: The iPod music player 2001: Start of Wikipedia , a free collaborative encyclopedia 2002: Cheap, hand-held computers are a big sales item. 2004: Survey: U.S. women spend more online game time than men, teens. 2005: Valve Software (makers of Half-Life ) starts Valve Developer Community 2006: Microsoft introduces XNA Game Studio Express : players create games 2006: Nintendo game controller responds to hand, body movements 2006: Study reports growing loneliness of Americans 2006: In a year and a half, YouTube posts 100 million videos; adds 70,000 daily 2006: DirecTV experiment lets viewers choose baseball game camera angles 2007: iPhone surfs Web, emails, makes phone calls, takes pictures, A/V player 2007: Cell phone can now tune into television programs 2007: More than six million “residents” of Second Life 2008: Young Japanese women (mostly) write texting novels on cellphones 2008: Apple presents MacBook Air (0.16-0.76 inches thick) 2008: more than ten million subscribers to World of Warcraft 2009: introduction internet-enabled televisions 2009: cellphone carriers warn for “digital traffic jam” during Obama inauguration
    • Converged
    • Interactive
    • Personalized
    • Screen-based
    • Wireless
    • Networked
    • Miniaturized
  • future media devices and what we may do with them…