• Save
Managing Media Work
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Managing Media Work

on

  • 2,225 views

This slideshow presents the key ideas and insights on contemporary media management theory and research, as collected in the edited volume "Managing Media Work" (publisher: Sage, 2010). Management is ...

This slideshow presents the key ideas and insights on contemporary media management theory and research, as collected in the edited volume "Managing Media Work" (publisher: Sage, 2010). Management is seen here as the management of media firms as well as the management of individual media careers. The people in the pictures used are in fact among the authors featured in the book.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,225
Views on SlideShare
2,212
Embed Views
13

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
0
Comments
2

5 Embeds 13

http://www.slideshare.net 5
http://www.twylah.com 3
http://localhost 2
https://twitter.com 2
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Introduction: to promote/present Managing Media Work (Summer 2010)
  • the MMW book: essays on how scholars see their work contributing to an understanding of the management of media work. What should media managers know about this work, and how could or should it influence their work? (Boczkowski: no palatable diagnoses/ empowering strategies here!); media management "is under-explored and under-theorized (Bozena Mierzejewska)
  • the MMW book: essays on how scholars see their work contributing to an understanding of the management of media work. What should media managers know about this work, and how could or should it influence their work? (Boczkowski: no palatable diagnoses/ empowering strategies here!); media management "is under-explored and under-theorized (Bozena Mierzejewska)
  • 2. What is MMW? management and creation of content in these industries have become increasingly interdependent. To understand the emergent relationship between ‘management’ and ‘creativity’ we need to consider first the shift away from a model of unique art works authored by individual artists towards a more complex model which embeds individual creativity in a broader system of cultural production (Chris Bilton)
  • 3. our choice in MMW thus focuses not so much on Rationalist (Content), Adaptive (Process) schools, but on Interpretive (Social Architecture / Organizational Culture) Schools of Strategic Management (Lucy Kueng)
  • 4. MMW considers: "agencement"/"agencies" found in the hybrid, material and distributed character of [media] work (Liz McFall)
  • 4. MMW considers: "agencement"/"agencies" found in the hybrid, material and distributed character of [media] work (Liz McFall)
  • 4. MMW considers: "agencement"/"agencies" found in the hybrid, material and distributed character of [media] work (Liz McFall)
  • 4. MMW considers: "agencement"/"agencies" found in the hybrid, material and distributed character of [media] work (Liz McFall)
  • 4. MMW considers: "agencement"/"agencies" found in the hybrid, material and distributed character of [media] work (Liz McFall)
  • 5. MMW focus: is on the individual media student, media practitioner, media professional (or "Pro-Am" by Charles Leadbeater & Paul Miller, "Amafessional" by Mark Penn in the WSJ, "produser" by Axel Bruns, "prosumer" by Alvin Toffler); at the heart of most concerns regarding MMW is: shift in power/control (over storytelling, authority, resources) away from professionals to audiences and corporations.
  • 5. MMW focus: is on the individual media student, media practitioner, media professional (or "Pro-Am" by Charles Leadbeater & Paul Miller, "Amafessional" by Mark Penn in the WSJ, "produser" by Axel Bruns, "prosumer" by Alvin Toffler); at the heart of most concerns regarding MMW is: shift in power/control (over storytelling, authority, resources) away from professionals to audiences and corporations.
  • direct consequence of taking creative work out of the exclusive hands of professionals and companies AND outsourcing work translocally: corporations cutting transaction/overhead costs of knowledge work & outsourcing to consumers
  • 6. overall, if we are to understand organizational practice in media organizations, there is a need to analyze the interaction of relations at the macro, meso and micro levels of the organization; MACRO: regulatory, technological and competitive environments; MESO: organizational culture, strategies and policies; MICRO: interactions, relationships (Tim Marjoribanks)
  • 7a. Context MMW MACRO: Media industries display two seemingly contradictory trends: a very high rate of new firm formation, and significant concentration of ownership in increasingly fewer hands of transnational conglomerates + Vertical disintegration, outsourcing, downsizing, and low barriers to entry via post-secondary education have created large pools of flexible, free-agent media labor (Charles Davis) new wave of creative cities and creative milieu and creative industries policies around the globe (Terry Flew)
  • 7b. Context MMW MESO: Trends: 1) content a-la-carte; 2) content everywhere; 3) content for free; 4) user-generated content, open sourcing/crowdsourcing, online social networks (decentring of content creation (Chris Bilton)); 5) content goes global; 6) content about content (targeted advertising, marketing/ promotions) (Annet Aris)
  • 7c. Context MMW MICRO: All of these trends take us away from [the traditional cultural industries] value chain towards a more flexible, overlapping set of skills and competences, shared across and between enterprises and individuals (Chris Bilton)
  • 7c. Context MMW MICRO: All of these trends take us away from [the traditional cultural industries] value chain towards a more flexible, overlapping set of skills and competences, shared across and between enterprises and individuals (Chris Bilton)
  • 8. a note of caution: Epochal shifts or graduated change in media, optimistic or pessimistic appraisals? (Terry Flew)
  • 8. a note of caution: Epochal shifts or graduated change in media, optimistic or pessimistic appraisals? (Terry Flew)
  • 8. a note of caution: Epochal shifts or graduated change in media, optimistic or pessimistic appraisals? (Terry Flew)
  • 8. a note of caution: Epochal shifts or graduated change in media, optimistic or pessimistic appraisals? (Terry Flew)
  • 8. a note of caution: Epochal shifts or graduated change in media, optimistic or pessimistic appraisals? (Terry Flew)
  • 9a. MACRO: deregulatory policy environment (Terry Flew, Philip Napoli); globalization (Marina Vujnovic & Dean Kruckeberg, Annet Aris); NIDCL (Keith Randle, Toby Miller); casualization of labor (Deuze & Fortunati, Aphra Kerr); flux and uncertainty in media entertainment [and] new entrepreneurial opportunities are emerging (Susan Christopherson); fragile international incentive programs (Alisa Perren, Keith Randle)
  • 9b. MESO: Emphasis on swift and agile rather than lumbering monoliths (Sean Nixon); Why do we still talk about organization in an era that seems to celebrate looseness and non-commitment? (Ned Rossiter & Geert Lovink ); 1) deterioration in the “infrastructure” that once supported the production process and 2) new production strategies (Susan Christopherson); Organizational barriers to cross media (Jane Singer, Annet Aris); in part explained by "world is evil" outlook of firms (Marina Vujnovic & Dean Kruckeberg); no firm-internal labor market, high dynamism (Keith Randle); focus firmly on competitor-colleagues leading to mimicry/ imitation/ homogenization (Boczkowski); Lack of shared vision, clarity of goals, failure to allocate resources (Deuze & Fortunati); media workers either embrace or reject change linked in part to their perceptions of whether or not their boundaries of expertise and authority are being enhanced or constricted (Tim Marjoribanks)
  • 9c. MICRO: shift to immaterial labor breeds flexibiity AND precariousness (Toby Miller); demographics, working hours, the erasure of boundaries between work and play and the need for constant re and up-skilling; a high degree of mobility amongst industry workers; the high degree of burnout in the industry (Aphra Kerr); self-programmable labor (Manuel Castells) and individual creative entrepeneurship (Keith Randle) and 3 different perspectives on media self-employment (Charles Davis: industry self-renewal / the Hollywood model / precariat); convergence mentality/ hybrids (Chris Hackley & Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul, Chris Bilton, Susan Christopherson), soloist to director (Annet Aris) and superstar DJ as example of remix culture (Chris Bilton); self-branding and a cult of personality (Jane Singer, Charles Davis); but: Who we say we are requires validation from external sources (Chris Hackley & Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul); similar to media firms becoming part of the "lifeworld" of clients as well as consumers/communities - as communication and community functions become as important as content (Sean Nixon, Marina Vujnovic & Dean Kruckeberg, Lucy Kueng); [Individual Strategies / Coping Mechanisms]: 1) art side projects, 2) self-branding (persinal branding: SPWG branding), 3) creating promotional content (Alisa Perren); More focus on professional rather than organizational values needed (Bozena Merzejewska); idiosyncracy (Boczkowski); rediscovery of 'craft' in cultural production (to differentiate content (Chris Bilton); need for new orgnets (Ned Rossiter & Geert Lovink)
  • in conclusion/final thoughts Paul Romer: Perhaps the most important ideas of all are meta-ideas—ideas about how to support the production and transmission of other ideas. Source: http://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/EconomicGrowth.html Paul M. Romer is the STANCO 25 Professor of Economics in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He also founded Aplia, a publisher of Web-based teaching tools that is changing how college students learn economics.
  • 10. Conclusion - A Historical View: How to create the new/digital media company? 1) The top down approach: creating the world’s leading “multimedia content machines” [1990s-2001]; 2) Separation of online and offline activities [2002-2005]; 3) Careful build up of integrated functions [2006-onwards]; 4) The next wave: Skill based networks (Annet Aris)

Managing Media Work Managing Media Work Presentation Transcript

  • Managing Media Work Mark Deuze & Brian Steward
    • Bozena Mierzejewska
    • Philip Napoli
    • Toby Miller
    • Jane Singer
    • Stephen Quinn
    • Keith Randle
    • Alisa Perren
    • Liz McFall
    • Sean Nixon
    • Dean Kruckeberg
    • Chris Hackley
    • Ned Rossiter
    • RosalindGill
    • Aphra Kerr
    Lucy Kung Tim Marjoribanks Chris Bilton Annet Aris Pablo Boczkowski Terry Flew Charles Davis Leopoldina Fortunati Geert Lovink Susan Christopherson Marina Vujnovic Amy Tiwsakul Brian Steward Mark Deuze
  •  
  • “ Even though media management aims to build a bridge between the general management theory and […] the media industry, the field is far from clearly defined or cohesive. Additionally it is under-explored and under-theorized.” - Bozena Mierzejewska
  • NO palatable diagnoses empowering strategies comprehensive solutions
  • “ Academic distinctions between autonomous art and controlling managerialism overlook the synergies and connections between artists and managers in the art world, and in the daily practice of artists.”
  • New forms of management in the creative sector Theories of creativity and innovation in management Management of Culture, Culture of Management Management theory Creative industries
  • Approaches to Strategic Media Management Rationalist focus on content Adaptive focus on process Interpretive focus on social architecture
  • EVERYTHING IS MEDIA MANAGEMENT - Liz McFall
  • EVERYTHING IS MEDIA MANAGEMENT - Liz McFall the industry
  • EVERYTHING IS MEDIA MANAGEMENT - Liz McFall the technology
  • EVERYTHING IS MEDIA MANAGEMENT - Liz McFall the workforce
  • EVERYTHING IS MEDIA MANAGEMENT - Liz McFall the worker
  • all your base are belong to us current trend in media management:
  • … and to us
  • precarity in media work 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009 2009 total: 14,190+ jobs Layoffs and buyouts at U.S. newspapers in 2009
  • 2009 2009 total: 14,190+ jobs Layoffs and buyouts at U.S. newspapers in 2009 2009: Advertising's Black Thursday: Layoffs, Spend Cuts, Hiring Freezes and Client Collapses Bedevil the Biz
  • 2009 2009 total: 14,190+ jobs Layoffs and buyouts at U.S. newspapers in 2009 2009: Advertising's Black Thursday: Layoffs, Spend Cuts, Hiring Freezes and Client Collapses Bedevil the Biz On-location film and TV shoots in L.A. hit lowest levels on record
  • 2009 2009 total: 14,190+ jobs Layoffs and buyouts at U.S. newspapers in 2009 2009: Advertising's Black Thursday: Layoffs, Spend Cuts, Hiring Freezes and Client Collapses Bedevil the Biz Game industry suffered 8,450 job losses since July 2008 On-location film and TV shoots in L.A. hit lowest levels on record
  • MACRO regulations technology competition MESO culture strategies policies MICRO interactions relationships networks understanding organizational practice in media companies
  • the macro context of managing media work: concentration and disintegration in the hourglass
  • the mesocontext of managing media work: content is kings content a-la-carte content everywhere content for free content by users content goes global content about content
  • the microcontext of managing media work: value chains…
  • the microcontext of managing media work: … value networks
  • A BRIEF REST AND A WORD OF CAUTION
  • OPTIMISM!
  • or PESSIMISM?
  • EPIC TRANSFORMATION!
  • or GRADUAL CHANGE?
  • “ The most valuable insights […] will come from a capacity to synthesize an understanding of the political economy of new media, the wellsprings of creativity and innovation, and the enabling role of the nation-state” - Terry Flew
  • MACRO a new international division of cultural labor
  • MESO flexible, swift and agile companies (rather than lumbering monoliths)
  • MICRO role change: from soloist to superstar DJ
  • Concluding Thoughts: Meta-Ideas and OrgNets
  • Brian Steward <bdsteward@indiana.edu> Mark Deuze <mdeuze@indiana.edu>