advertising, marketing communications & public relations = production of culture technology laws & regulations organizatio...
<ul><li>technology: everything online, mobile & integrated </li></ul><ul><li>laws: self-regulation & standards </li></ul><...
 
technology: everything online
technology: everything mobile & integrated
idea idea idea idea idea idea idea idea TV Radio Print OOH online PR DR
idea Meez MMS Foursquare Facebook MyBlog Twitter Mocospace IM email SMS Flickr YouTube MySpace TV Radio Print DOOH online ...
laws: industry self-regulation
institutions: the hourglass
institutions: power shift
organization: project ecologies
 
 
careers: giving “a little extra”
careers: leaving home [is] easy
markets: globalization, avoidance, credibility
 
keeping up with the field is easy to do
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Advertising

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Media Life is a course intended for undergraduate students across campus. Its goal is to make people aware of the role that media play in their everyday life. The key to understanding a "media life" is to see our lives not as lived WITH media (which would lead to a focus on media effects and media-centric theories of society), but rather IN media (where the distinction between what we do with and without media dissolves). This presentation was co-designed with Phoebe Elefante.

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  • POC: Technology; Law &amp; Policy; Organization of Work; Careers; Markets some cool ads: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6PSbUl_68k http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NvJs3KNdkw
  • http://www.nonstopfernando.com/
  • TECHNOLOGY: Technology: Everything Online and Mobile
  • example: Halo 3 campaign: http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2007/09/dissecting-halo/ Phase 1: Starry Nights. During Monday Night Football last Dec. 4, Microsoft hit 7.9 million households (and 1.8 million of its target 18-34 audience) with an eerie spot featuring Master Chief grabbing his helmet and jumping into the fray. Tag: &amp;quot;Finish the fight.&amp;quot; It has since been viewed on YouTube more than 3 million times. Phase 2: The Beta. In May, fans could enter to win a chance to try a multiplayer beta version at Halo3.com. A third of a million people entered. Additionally, anyone who purchased the title Crackdown could play the beta. Before the beta expired on June 10, 820,000 participants spent more than 12 million hours of playing online. Using its saved films feature, where you can capture snippets of gameplay and download it, more than 350 terabytes of Halo 3 data was downloaded from Xbox Live (which is the equivalent of 82 million music downloads). Phase 3: Project Iris. This five-part viral effort harkens back to Halo 2&apos;s cryptic &amp;quot;Ilovebees&amp;quot; effort. Beginning with a fake ad planted in Best Buy circulars, &amp;quot;Halo nation&amp;quot; sought out clues via an online/offline scavenger hunt to unlock new information about Halo 3 and its back-story. Phase 4: Promotional Partner Activity. Much like movie franchises look to secure key category partners, so did Halo 3. It locked up Pontiac, which committed $5 million in media to the game&apos;s launch, and Mountain Dew which has been heavily promoting its Halo 3-themed Game Fuel flavor on TV, plus Burger King, Game Stop,7-Eleven, Samsung and Comcast. It is even sponsoring Linkin Park&apos;s current tour. Phase 5: Believe. Microsoft began re-running Starry Nights last month leading up to the Believe campaign this week. A week-long celebration featuring the making of specials, tournaments and media frenzy typical of a Hollywood blockbuster will lead up to a midnight madness event. In the U.S. alone, 10,000 stores will open at midnight to give fans the chance to buy the product first. &amp;quot;This is very different from the launch of Halo 2,&amp;quot; said Jeff Bell, vp-interactive entertainment for global marketing. &amp;quot;We had our secret program, Ilovebees, but we didn&apos;t have a beta, or participate at E3, we just kind of burst on the scene. This time around, we wanted to draw a broader audience. We wanted to invite everyone in.&amp;quot; or HBO True Blood by Campfire: http://www.campfirenyc.com/2009/09/02/true-blood-revelation/
  • DOOH = Digital Out Of Home: “ DOOH Reaches Two-Thirds of US Adults ” DR = Direct Response; “The direct response advertising business is a $250 Billion dollar industry.”
  • LAW: Laws: Self-Regulation &amp; Standards: Advertising Standards Association UK (children, tobacco/alcohol, violent imagery; vgl FTC US); Elave commercial
  • So how is work organized? Key structure of the global media industries: HOURGLASS. Here an example of the advertising industry PUBLICIS: LA HOLISTIC DIFFERENCE
  • INSTITUTION: power shift
  • Organization: Project Ecologies
  • MARKETS: Globalization also: in store tv network: http://www.burgerbusiness.com/?p=2354
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTZPuxc0VEo https://www.adbusters.org/campaigns/bnd
  • Transcript of "Advertising"

    1. 1. advertising, marketing communications & public relations = production of culture technology laws & regulations organizations careers markets
    2. 2. <ul><li>technology: everything online, mobile & integrated </li></ul><ul><li>laws: self-regulation & standards </li></ul><ul><li>institutions: shift from creative to consultant </li></ul><ul><li>organizations: project ecologies </li></ul><ul><li>careers: everybody is supposed to leave </li></ul><ul><li>markets : globalization, credibility, avoidance </li></ul>
    3. 4. technology: everything online
    4. 5. technology: everything mobile & integrated
    5. 6. idea idea idea idea idea idea idea idea TV Radio Print OOH online PR DR
    6. 7. idea Meez MMS Foursquare Facebook MyBlog Twitter Mocospace IM email SMS Flickr YouTube MySpace TV Radio Print DOOH online PR DR junk
    7. 8. laws: industry self-regulation
    8. 9. institutions: the hourglass
    9. 10. institutions: power shift
    10. 11. organization: project ecologies
    11. 14. careers: giving “a little extra”
    12. 15. careers: leaving home [is] easy
    13. 16. markets: globalization, avoidance, credibility
    14. 18. keeping up with the field is easy to do

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