Telling Stories - Nonfiction

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  • Telling Stories - Nonfiction

    1. 1. Telling StoriesComponents of a personal narrative
    2. 2. Five main (there are others)components to telling astory:
    3. 3. No. 1 - Narrative Tell a story. Your personal essay should have a beginning middle and end. Begin with the lead.
    4. 4. No. 2 - Dialogue What did people say? Give your characters a voice. You don’t have to remember what was said EXACTLY. Just be close.
    5. 5. No. 3 - Reflection While telling your story, be sure to include reflection. Ask yourself, “What reasons caused me to behave or react this way?” or “What was I thinking?” or allow yourself some type of philosophical thought.
    6. 6. No. 4 - Description Describe the prominent features of places, people and objects. Give your story a real-world sense. What did it or he or she smell, look, taste, feel or sound like?
    7. 7. No. 5 - Setting Where and when is your story taking place? Do you have some good descriptions of the scenes?
    8. 8. Other storytelling guidelines
    9. 9. 1. Each paragraph shouldaccomplish only one thing.
    10. 10. Keep your paragraphs short.Three sentences MAX.
    11. 11. This means that the five-to-eight sentence paragraphsyou are used to will befrowned upon here.
    12. 12. One-sentence or even one-word paragraphs areperfectly fine.
    13. 13. Think about the impact of this sentence: She left me.
    14. 14. Would that action have the same impact if itappeared in your essay like this? I had my dog since she was a pup. She grew up with me. She was, in fact, my only friend throughout high school. I often thought about what would happen when she aged. What would I do? Would I be able to “put her to sleep”? Kill her? I didn’t know. But I didn’t have to worry about it. She left me.
    15. 15. Don’t bury the impactingsentence
    16. 16. Remember to require only asingle function from eachparagraph.
    17. 17. So write it like this:I had my dog since she was a pup. She grew up withme. She was, in fact, my only friend throughout highschool. (narrative)I often thought about what would happen when sheaged. What would I do? Would I be able to “put her tosleep”? Kill her? (reflection)I didn’t know. But, it turned out I didn’t have to worryabout it. (narrative)She left me. (narrative with impact)
    18. 18. Your essay grade WILLsuffer if you turn in one largechunk of text.
    19. 19. 2. Write dialogue simply.
    20. 20. Start a new paragraph wheneversomeone starts and then finishesspeaking--don’t bury the dialogueat the end of a paragraph
    21. 21. Use simple attribution.
    22. 22. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.
    23. 23. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.
    24. 24. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”
    25. 25. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”-Your quotes should look like this. Don’t use fancyattribution (“stated,” “cried,” “moaned”) and don’tbegin with the attribution (Jack said, “Quote.”)
    26. 26. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”-Your quotes should look like this. Don’t use fancyattribution (“stated,” “cried,” “moaned”) and don’tbegin with the attribution (Jack said, “Quote.”)-You want ALL attention on what the speaker says,not your attribution.
    27. 27. 3. Know your audience
    28. 28. Who are you writing yourstory for? Is it for teenagers?Adults? Parents? Teachers?Know this and then startwriting.
    29. 29. 4. Proofread
    30. 30. If you don’t care about yourstory, why should theaudience?
    31. 31. I’ve shown you how topunctuate quotes. You knowhow to punctuate everythingelse. Be perfect.
    32. 32. I will not read your story ifyou have a single lowercase“i” ... as in “i will not readyour story.”
    33. 33. Know what their/there/they’re to use.
    34. 34. Contractions are OK. And youmay begin a sentence or twowith “and” or “but” because thisadds emphasis.
    35. 35. 5. Read your story out loud.
    36. 36. Nothing in the world can tell youabout the quality of your writing asreading it out loud.

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