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Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
Telling Stories - Nonfiction
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Telling Stories - Nonfiction

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Telling StoriesComponents of a personal narrative
    • 2. Five main (there are others)components to telling astory:
    • 3. No. 1 - Narrative Tell a story. Your personal essay should have a beginning middle and end. Begin with the lead.
    • 4. No. 2 - Dialogue What did people say? Give your characters a voice. You don’t have to remember what was said EXACTLY. Just be close.
    • 5. No. 3 - Reflection While telling your story, be sure to include reflection. Ask yourself, “What reasons caused me to behave or react this way?” or “What was I thinking?” or allow yourself some type of philosophical thought.
    • 6. No. 4 - Description Describe the prominent features of places, people and objects. Give your story a real-world sense. What did it or he or she smell, look, taste, feel or sound like?
    • 7. No. 5 - Setting Where and when is your story taking place? Do you have some good descriptions of the scenes?
    • 8. Other storytelling guidelines
    • 9. 1. Each paragraph shouldaccomplish only one thing.
    • 10. Keep your paragraphs short.Three sentences MAX.
    • 11. This means that the five-to-eight sentence paragraphsyou are used to will befrowned upon here.
    • 12. One-sentence or even one-word paragraphs areperfectly fine.
    • 13. Think about the impact of this sentence: She left me.
    • 14. Would that action have the same impact if itappeared in your essay like this? I had my dog since she was a pup. She grew up with me. She was, in fact, my only friend throughout high school. I often thought about what would happen when she aged. What would I do? Would I be able to “put her to sleep”? Kill her? I didn’t know. But I didn’t have to worry about it. She left me.
    • 15. Don’t bury the impactingsentence
    • 16. Remember to require only asingle function from eachparagraph.
    • 17. So write it like this:I had my dog since she was a pup. She grew up withme. She was, in fact, my only friend throughout highschool. (narrative)I often thought about what would happen when sheaged. What would I do? Would I be able to “put her tosleep”? Kill her? (reflection)I didn’t know. But, it turned out I didn’t have to worryabout it. (narrative)She left me. (narrative with impact)
    • 18. Your essay grade WILLsuffer if you turn in one largechunk of text.
    • 19. 2. Write dialogue simply.
    • 20. Start a new paragraph wheneversomeone starts and then finishesspeaking--don’t bury the dialogueat the end of a paragraph
    • 21. Use simple attribution.
    • 22. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.
    • 23. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.
    • 24. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”
    • 25. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”-Your quotes should look like this. Don’t use fancyattribution (“stated,” “cried,” “moaned”) and don’tbegin with the attribution (Jack said, “Quote.”)
    • 26. Use simple attribution.-“Quote,” he said.-“Quote,” she said.-“Beginning quote,” he said. “Morequote.”-Your quotes should look like this. Don’t use fancyattribution (“stated,” “cried,” “moaned”) and don’tbegin with the attribution (Jack said, “Quote.”)-You want ALL attention on what the speaker says,not your attribution.
    • 27. 3. Know your audience
    • 28. Who are you writing yourstory for? Is it for teenagers?Adults? Parents? Teachers?Know this and then startwriting.
    • 29. 4. Proofread
    • 30. If you don’t care about yourstory, why should theaudience?
    • 31. I’ve shown you how topunctuate quotes. You knowhow to punctuate everythingelse. Be perfect.
    • 32. I will not read your story ifyou have a single lowercase“i” ... as in “i will not readyour story.”
    • 33. Know what their/there/they’re to use.
    • 34. Contractions are OK. And youmay begin a sentence or twowith “and” or “but” because thisadds emphasis.
    • 35. 5. Read your story out loud.
    • 36. Nothing in the world can tell youabout the quality of your writing asreading it out loud.

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