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Introduction to The Great Gatsby
 

Introduction to The Great Gatsby

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My introduction to The Great Gatsby's time period and to the author.

My introduction to The Great Gatsby's time period and to the author.

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    Introduction to The Great Gatsby Introduction to The Great Gatsby Presentation Transcript

    • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldMonday, January 14, 13
    • What do you think of when you hear “Roaring Twenties”?Monday, January 14, 13
    • Monday, January 14, 13
    • This decade saw the rise (and demise) of many things, such as...Monday, January 14, 13
    • huge parties with big bands, lots ofalcohol and lots of love.Monday, January 14, 13
    • the influx of black artists, like singer,dancer and actress Josephine Baker.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The rise of flappers.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The rise of film and movie stars.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The rise of the modern Broadway musical.Monday, January 14, 13
    • Social InequalityMonday, January 14, 13
    • It saw good times for the wealthy.Monday, January 14, 13
    • ... but tough times for the poor.Monday, January 14, 13
    • Top .1% (114,000 Americans) Bottom 42% (48 million Americans) 50% 50% Text The wealth controlled by the very few equaled the wealth of almost half the countryMonday, January 14, 13
    • Prohibition and GangstersMonday, January 14, 13
    • The 18th Amendment, or the prohibition of alcohol, was instituted in 1920Monday, January 14, 13
    • Prohibition led to ...Monday, January 14, 13
    • bootlegging, or the illegal movement and sale of alcohol.Monday, January 14, 13
    • speakeasies, or illegally operated bars, which were usually run by gangsters.Monday, January 14, 13
    • crime lords, and bootlegging king pens, like AlCapone.Monday, January 14, 13
    • rise in mob violence, which culminated in the 1929 St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.Monday, January 14, 13
    • ScandalsMonday, January 14, 13
    • In 1919, eight members of the Chicago White Soxwere accused of throwing the World Series.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The Jewish mobster Arnold Rothstein, who funded the scandal (this is an actor from Boardwalk Empire) is fictionalized in The Great Gatsby as Meyer WolfsheimMonday, January 14, 13
    • Citizens lost trust in the police because of cops purchased by organized crime and lost trust in government because of several scandals.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The Teapot Dome ScandalMonday, January 14, 13
    • Themes The history of the era contributes to many of the novel’s themes.Monday, January 14, 13
    • As American society becomes more materialistic and loses faith in ideals, the green land turns into a valley of ashes.Monday, January 14, 13
    • The very wealthy are insensitive to others and exhibit a moral laxness because of their riches.Monday, January 14, 13
    • Because he does have a dream, energy, and enthusiasm, Gatsby is superior to the idle rich he wishes to emulate.Monday, January 14, 13
    • About the author F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940)Monday, January 14, 13
    • Many of the events that happen in The Great Gatsby closely resemble those that occurred in Fitzgerald’s life.Monday, January 14, 13
    • Quick FactsMonday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, MinnesotaMonday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota 2. Went to Princeton and then went off to join the army*Monday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota 2. Went to Princeton and then went off to join the army* * Nick Carraway does the same in GatsbyMonday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota 2. Went to Princeton and then went off to join the army* 3. He is part of The Lost Generation of writers who moved to Europe following the war. * Nick Carraway does the same in GatsbyMonday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota 2. Went to Princeton and then went off to join the army* 3. He is part of The Lost Generation of writers who moved to Europe following the war. 4. While at Princeton, he fell in love with the young socialite, Ginevra King. When Fitzgerald is overseas, she informs him that she’s marrying someone of her social class.** * Nick Carraway does the same in GatsbyMonday, January 14, 13
    • Quick Facts 1. Born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota 2. Went to Princeton and then went off to join the army* 3. He is part of The Lost Generation of writers who moved to Europe following the war. 4. While at Princeton, he fell in love with the young socialite, Ginevra King. When Fitzgerald is overseas, she informs him that she’s marrying someone of her social class.** ** Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby’s love, is modeled * Nick Carraway does the same in Gatsby on this characterMonday, January 14, 13
    • Fitzgerald’s wife , Zelda, suffered from alcoholism and schizophrenia.Monday, January 14, 13