English 3 - Modern Poetry

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  • English 3 - Modern Poetry

    1. 1. Poetry!e Modern A" (1915-1946)
    2. 2. T. S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot1888 -1965Received more critical acclaim thanthat of any other American poet of histime.Eliot settled in England and became adevout member of the Church ofEnglandHis most famous poem, "The WasteLand," which contrasts the spiritualbankruptcy that Eliot saw as thedominant force in modern Europewith the values and unity thatgoverned the past.
    3. 3. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"Stream of Consciousness - A term originatedby American psychologist William James todescribe the natural flow of a personsthoughts. In this type of writing, writers abandoned transitions and other linking devices used in ordinary prose, instead connecting thoughts through the characters natural associations
    4. 4. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"Context: The poem takes place at a tea partyand the speaker anticipates addressing awoman he likesThe "you and I" most likely refers to twoaspects of the same person -- the pessimist andthe optimist.While these are common interpretations forthis poem, there are many different ones
    5. 5. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"Epigraph is from Dantes Inferno and describes Prufrock’s ideal listener: one who isas lost as the speaker and will never betray to the world the content of theupcoming confessions.Part I (lines 1-36): While contemplating tea with a woman, the speaker invites the"you"into a modern city in the evening and proceeds to describe images such as"half-deserted streets" and "yellow smoke."Part II (lines 37-110): the speaker asks questions about himself - his past andpresent life. Has he done enough? Is he capable of love? Human action?  Does it matter?Part III (lines 111-131) Prufock, the speaker, answers his questions as a negative. He sees him and others drowning in a sea of troubles. Life has no meaning and is concerned with petty vanity
    6. 6. Amy Lowell1874-1925Born in Brookline, Mass.Considered, along withEzra Pound, the leaderof the Imagist movement Pound found her poetry overly sentimental and he severed connections with the group
    7. 7. Imagism and Dramatic Monologue
    8. 8. Imagism and Dramatic MonologueImagism - A literary movement that flourished between 1912and 1927 led by Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound.
    9. 9. Imagism and Dramatic MonologueImagism - A literary movement that flourished between 1912and 1927 led by Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound. These poets rejected 19th century poetic forms and language
    10. 10. Imagism and Dramatic MonologueImagism - A literary movement that flourished between 1912and 1927 led by Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound. These poets rejected 19th century poetic forms and language They wrote short poems that used ordinary language and free verse to create sharp, exact, concentrated pictures.
    11. 11. Imagism and Dramatic MonologueImagism - A literary movement that flourished between 1912and 1927 led by Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound. These poets rejected 19th century poetic forms and language They wrote short poems that used ordinary language and free verse to create sharp, exact, concentrated pictures.Dramatic Monologue - A poem in which one character speaks toone or more silent listeners at a critical point in the speakerslife
    12. 12. Imagism and Dramatic MonologueImagism - A literary movement that flourished between 1912and 1927 led by Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound. These poets rejected 19th century poetic forms and language They wrote short poems that used ordinary language and free verse to create sharp, exact, concentrated pictures.Dramatic Monologue - A poem in which one character speaks toone or more silent listeners at a critical point in the speakerslifeSimilar to a play in which one of the actors performs asoliloquy.
    13. 13. "Patterns"
    14. 14. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.
    15. 15. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.Four Parts:
    16. 16. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.Four Parts: Part I (lines 1-27) - Image of an 18th-century lady walking in her garden
    17. 17. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.Four Parts: Part I (lines 1-27) - Image of an 18th-century lady walking in her garden Part 2 (lines 28-55) - The lady dreams of ridding herself of the stiff costume, running through the garden, and yielding to the caresses of a phantom lover in military dress
    18. 18. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.Four Parts: Part I (lines 1-27) - Image of an 18th-century lady walking in her garden Part 2 (lines 28-55) - The lady dreams of ridding herself of the stiff costume, running through the garden, and yielding to the caresses of a phantom lover in military dress Part 3 (lines 56-90) - Its revealed that she received a message that her fiancé had died in battle.
    19. 19. "Patterns"Although there are many romantic elements in the poem, which isuncharacteristic of Imagism, "Patterns" is Lowells most successfulpoem.Four Parts: Part I (lines 1-27) - Image of an 18th-century lady walking in her garden Part 2 (lines 28-55) - The lady dreams of ridding herself of the stiff costume, running through the garden, and yielding to the caresses of a phantom lover in military dress Part 3 (lines 56-90) - Its revealed that she received a message that her fiancé had died in battle. Part 4 (lines 91-107) - She decides to keep up her appearances and to wonder about the breaking of patterns in life and war.
    20. 20. H.D. (Hilda Doolittle)H.D. has been called theperfect ImagistIn her poetry, H.D. favorsshort line in which asingle descriptive detailor action stands alone, asif for momentaryconsideration for its ownsake.
    21. 21. "Pear Tree"
    22. 22. "Pear Tree"In "Pear Tree" the poet expresses her feelingsabout seeing the tree in blossom
    23. 23. "Pear Tree"In "Pear Tree" the poet expresses her feelingsabout seeing the tree in blossomFirst she pictures the blossoms as a mass of silverdust that has been picked from the earth
    24. 24. "Pear Tree"In "Pear Tree" the poet expresses her feelingsabout seeing the tree in blossomFirst she pictures the blossoms as a mass of silverdust that has been picked from the earthThen she contrasts their solid and silveryappearance of any white flower
    25. 25. "Pear Tree"In "Pear Tree" the poet expresses her feelingsabout seeing the tree in blossomFirst she pictures the blossoms as a mass of silverdust that has been picked from the earthThen she contrasts their solid and silveryappearance of any white flowerFinally she addresses the tree, calling it theharbinger of summer
    26. 26. Edna St. Vincent Millay1892-1950Will always be associatedwith the unconventionallifestyle and artisticexperience of GreenwichVillage in New YorkLike other modern writers,her poetry expresses arebellious attitude andexplores the uncertaintyand disillusionment ofmodern life
    27. 27. "Renascence""Renascence" is a dramatic monologueTheme - The central idea or insight about life thata writer hopes to convey in a literary workIn "Renascence," Millay explores the universaltheme that a person can be reborn or reawakenedto discover a new understanding of the world.Millay wrote "Renascence" when she was 17
    28. 28. "Renascence" in Five Parts
    29. 29. "Renascence" in Five PartsPart 1 (Line 1-28) - The speakers feels her vision of the world limited by thelandscape around her, particularly the roof of the sky
    30. 30. "Renascence" in Five PartsPart 1 (Line 1-28) - The speakers feels her vision of the world limited by thelandscape around her, particularly the roof of the skyPart 2 (Lines 29-90) - The sky proves to be no boundary rather, it opens upto her a vision of eternity and infinity. She gains understanding andcompassion of all human life
    31. 31. "Renascence" in Five PartsPart 1 (Line 1-28) - The speakers feels her vision of the world limited by thelandscape around her, particularly the roof of the skyPart 2 (Lines 29-90) - The sky proves to be no boundary rather, it opens upto her a vision of eternity and infinity. She gains understanding andcompassion of all human lifePart 3 (Lines 91-146) - This burden sinks the speaker to her grave, which isrestful. However, she misses the natural world and prays that God wouldgrant her a new birth
    32. 32. "Renascence" in Five PartsPart 1 (Line 1-28) - The speakers feels her vision of the world limited by thelandscape around her, particularly the roof of the skyPart 2 (Lines 29-90) - The sky proves to be no boundary rather, it opens upto her a vision of eternity and infinity. She gains understanding andcompassion of all human lifePart 3 (Lines 91-146) - This burden sinks the speaker to her grave, which isrestful. However, she misses the natural world and prays that God wouldgrant her a new birthPart 4 (Lines 147-202) - She is reborn to a new appreciation of nature andGods presence in it.
    33. 33. "Renascence" in Five PartsPart 1 (Line 1-28) - The speakers feels her vision of the world limited by thelandscape around her, particularly the roof of the skyPart 2 (Lines 29-90) - The sky proves to be no boundary rather, it opens upto her a vision of eternity and infinity. She gains understanding andcompassion of all human lifePart 3 (Lines 91-146) - This burden sinks the speaker to her grave, which isrestful. However, she misses the natural world and prays that God wouldgrant her a new birthPart 4 (Lines 147-202) - She is reborn to a new appreciation of nature andGods presence in it.Part 5 (Lines 203-214) - She concludes that those with spirituality have nolimits.
    34. 34. E. E. Cummings1894-1962 (born Edward Estlin)Cummingss poems tend to beunconventional in form and styleHe explores subjects as love andnature, while innovatively usingcapitalization, punctuation, andgrammar to reinforce meaningGraduated from HarvardUniversity and served in theambulance corps during WWI.Settled in Greenwich Village
    35. 35. Cummings and Style
    36. 36. Cummings and StyleStyle - Refers to the manner in which a writerputs his or her ideas into words.
    37. 37. Cummings and StyleStyle - Refers to the manner in which a writerputs his or her ideas into words.In poetry, style is determined by factors likechoice and arrangement of words, length andarrangement of lines, stanza length and format,use of punctuation and capitalization, and useof literary devices
    38. 38. Cummings and StyleStyle - Refers to the manner in which a writerputs his or her ideas into words.In poetry, style is determined by factors likechoice and arrangement of words, length andarrangement of lines, stanza length and format,use of punctuation and capitalization, and useof literary devicesCummings was as concerned with the visual
    39. 39. "since feeling is first"In "since feeling is first," the speaker addressesa weeping woman. He asks her to yield to hisaffection and not to insist on formality."syntax" - orderly or systematic arrangement
    40. 40. Robert Frost
    41. 41. Robert Frost1874-1963
    42. 42. Robert Frost1874-1963One of Americas most loved andrespected poets.
    43. 43. Robert Frost1874-1963One of Americas most loved andrespected poets.Won four Pulitzer Prizes and read ata presidential inauguration
    44. 44. Robert Frost1874-1963One of Americas most loved andrespected poets.Won four Pulitzer Prizes and read ata presidential inaugurationOften wrote vividly about the NewEngland landscape
    45. 45. Robert Frost1874-1963One of Americas most loved andrespected poets.Won four Pulitzer Prizes and read ata presidential inaugurationOften wrote vividly about the NewEngland landscapeFrost on a poems effect on readers:"Like a piece of ice on a hot stovethe poem must ride its ownmelting ... Read it a hundred times:it will forever keeps its freshness asa petal keeps its fragrance."
    46. 46. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"
    47. 47. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"The speaker pauses during a nighttime journey throughthe woods to watch the falling snow.
    48. 48. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"The speaker pauses during a nighttime journey throughthe woods to watch the falling snow.He realizes, because of his horse, that he cannot stay forlong. He has commitments to keep and has miles to gobefore he can sleep
    49. 49. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"The speaker pauses during a nighttime journey throughthe woods to watch the falling snow.He realizes, because of his horse, that he cannot stay forlong. He has commitments to keep and has miles to gobefore he can sleepSymbols - A person, place, or thing that has meaning initself and also represents something larger than itself
    50. 50. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"The speaker pauses during a nighttime journey throughthe woods to watch the falling snow.He realizes, because of his horse, that he cannot stay forlong. He has commitments to keep and has miles to gobefore he can sleepSymbols - A person, place, or thing that has meaning initself and also represents something larger than itselfMany of Frosts poems might seem straightforward, butcan generally be interpreted in more than one way

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