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American Modernism

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This is my introduction to American Modernism for my junior English class.

This is my introduction to American Modernism for my junior English class.

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  • 1. Introduction to ModernismMonday, January 14, 13
  • 2. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the world was changing: E=MC² The Wright Brothers’ airplaneMonday, January 14, 13
  • 3. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 4. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 5. The late 18th and early 19th centuries saw the emergence of new philosophies and the creation of psychologyMonday, January 14, 13
  • 6. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 7. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 8. Sigmund Freud boiled human individuality down to an animalistic sex driveMonday, January 14, 13
  • 9. Sigmund Freud boiled human individuality down to an animalistic sex driveMonday, January 14, 13
  • 10. Sigmund Freud boiled human individuality down to an animalistic sex drive Karl Marx believed that social class was created, not inherentMonday, January 14, 13
  • 11. Sigmund Freud boiled human individuality down to an animalistic sex drive Karl Marx believed that social class was created, not inherentMonday, January 14, 13
  • 12. Sigmund Freud boiled human individuality down to an animalistic sex drive Karl Marx believed that social class was created, not inherent Friedrich Nietzsche argued that the most deeply held ethical principles were simply constructions (built by human minds)Monday, January 14, 13
  • 13. Artists began to believe that the old assurances from the world -- religion, politics, society -- were no longer enough.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 14. Artists began to believe that the old assurances from the world -- religion, politics, society -- were no longer enough. And this happened...Monday, January 14, 13
  • 15. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 16. World War IMonday, January 14, 13
  • 17. During “The Great War”... More than 16 million people from both sides died More than 20 million people from both sides were injured Left Americans returning home from the war disillusioned with the “American Dream”Monday, January 14, 13
  • 18. “This is the way the world ends / not with a bang but with a whimper” - T.S. Eliot’s “The Hollow Men” T.S. Eliot wrote many of his poems, including “The Wasteland” and “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” to express his disillusionment of the post-war world.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 19. This era of diverse movements became known as Modernism.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 20. Characteristics of Modernism?Monday, January 14, 13
  • 21. Characteristics of Modernism? Concerned that society was accelerating toward destruction and meaninglessnessMonday, January 14, 13
  • 22. Characteristics of Modernism? Concerned that society was accelerating toward destruction and meaninglessness There was a general pessimism about the state of the worldMonday, January 14, 13
  • 23. Characteristics of Modernism? Concerned that society was accelerating toward destruction and meaninglessness There was a general pessimism about the state of the world A belief that only the rebel artist is telling the truth about the world and could help inspire a better societyMonday, January 14, 13
  • 24. “Make it new!” - poet Ezra Pound.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 25. Art, literature and music all reflected this quoteMonday, January 14, 13
  • 26. JazzMonday, January 14, 13
  • 27. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 28. Monday, January 14, 13
  • 29. Just as there were several art movements during the Modernist period, there were many literary movements during this era.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 30. ImagismMonday, January 14, 13
  • 31. Pound wrote three rules for Imagism:Monday, January 14, 13
  • 32. Pound wrote three rules for Imagism: 1. “Simply present” an imageMonday, January 14, 13
  • 33. Pound wrote three rules for Imagism: 1. “Simply present” an image 2. The poet “does not comment”Monday, January 14, 13
  • 34. Pound wrote three rules for Imagism: 1. “Simply present” an image 2. The poet “does not comment” 3. The poet should use the words necessary to paint the image, not to fit some type of rhythmic patternMonday, January 14, 13
  • 35. “In a Station on the Metro” - Ezra Pound The apparition of the wet faces in the crowd; Petals on a wet, black boughMonday, January 14, 13
  • 36. The Lost Generation Refers to a group of expatriate, or exiled, artists living and working in Europe, primarily France. Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound are among the most famous writers of this group.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 37. Styles in Modernist literatureMonday, January 14, 13
  • 38. Styles in Modernist literature Writers used the Stream-of-Consciousness, or interior monologue, technique.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 39. Styles in Modernist literature Writers used the Stream-of-Consciousness, or interior monologue, technique. Poets practiced free verse, or poetry that follows the structure of normal speech.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 40. Styles in Modernist literature Writers used the Stream-of-Consciousness, or interior monologue, technique. Poets practiced free verse, or poetry that follows the structure of normal speech. Poets paid special attention to wordplay, typography, and punctuation.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 41. Modernism remained dominant in American literature until after World War II.Monday, January 14, 13
  • 42. The atomic bomb ushered in a new ageMonday, January 14, 13

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